whiterose

linux unikernel
Log | Files | Refs | README | LICENSE | git clone https://git.ne02ptzero.me/git/whiterose

commit 3868772b99e3146d02cf47e739d79022eba1d77c
parent 6f9d71c9c759b1e7d31189a4de228983192c7dc7
Author: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
Date:   Sat, 29 Dec 2018 11:21:49 -0800

Merge tag 'docs-5.0' of git://git.lwn.net/linux

Pull documentation update from Jonathan Corbet:
 "A fairly normal cycle for documentation stuff. We have a new document
  on perf security, more Italian translations, more improvements to the
  memory-management docs, improvements to the pathname lookup
  documentation, and the usual array of smaller fixes.

  As is often the case, there are a few reaches outside of
  Documentation/ to adjust kerneldoc comments"

* tag 'docs-5.0' of git://git.lwn.net/linux: (38 commits)
  docs: improve pathname-lookup document structure
  configfs: fix wrong name of struct in documentation
  docs/mm-api: link slab_common.c to "The Slab Cache" section
  slab: make kmem_cache_create{_usercopy} description proper kernel-doc
  doc:process: add links where missing
  docs/core-api: make mm-api.rst more structured
  x86, boot: documentation whitespace fixup
  Documentation: devres: note checking needs when converting
  doc:it: add some process/* translations
  doc:it: fixes in process/1.Intro
  Documentation: convert path-lookup from markdown to resturctured text
  Documentation/admin-guide: update admin-guide index.rst
  Documentation/admin-guide: introduce perf-security.rst file
  scripts/kernel-doc: Fix struct and struct field attribute processing
  Documentation: dev-tools: Fix typos in index.rst
  Correct gen_init_cpio tool's documentation
  Document /proc/pid PID reuse behavior
  Documentation: update path-lookup.md for parallel lookups
  Documentation: Use "while" instead of "whilst"
  dmaengine: Add mailing list address to the documentation
  ...

Diffstat:
MDocumentation/EDID/1024x768.S | 5++---
MDocumentation/EDID/1280x1024.S | 5++---
MDocumentation/EDID/1600x1200.S | 5++---
MDocumentation/EDID/1680x1050.S | 5++---
MDocumentation/EDID/1920x1080.S | 5++---
MDocumentation/EDID/800x600.S | 5++---
MDocumentation/EDID/HOWTO.txt | 13++-----------
MDocumentation/EDID/Makefile | 15+++++++++++++--
MDocumentation/EDID/edid.S | 10++++++----
MDocumentation/admin-guide/devices.rst | 1+
MDocumentation/admin-guide/dynamic-debug-howto.rst | 8++++----
MDocumentation/admin-guide/index.rst | 1+
MDocumentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/admin-guide/mm/concepts.rst | 51++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------
ADocumentation/admin-guide/perf-security.rst | 97+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
MDocumentation/admin-guide/ras.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/arm/Booting | 2+-
MDocumentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/GPIO.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/Overview.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/Suspend.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/core-api/assoc_array.rst | 6+++---
MDocumentation/core-api/memory-allocation.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/core-api/mm-api.rst | 32+++++++++++++++++++++++---------
MDocumentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/dev-tools/index.rst | 4++--
MDocumentation/dev-tools/kselftest.rst | 12++++++------
MDocumentation/device-mapper/dm-raid.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/devicetree/bindings/arm/idle-states.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/devicetree/bindings/pci/host-generic-pci.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/devicetree/bindings/serial/rs485.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/doc-guide/sphinx.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/driver-api/dmaengine/dmatest.rst | 4++++
MDocumentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/driver-model/devres.txt | 7+++++++
MDocumentation/early-userspace/README | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/caching/cachefiles.txt | 4++--
MDocumentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/caching/operations.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/configfs/configfs.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/index.rst | 21+++++++++++++++++++++
DDocumentation/filesystems/path-lookup.md | 1297-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ADocumentation/filesystems/path-lookup.rst | 1346+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
MDocumentation/filesystems/proc.txt | 13++++++++++++-
MDocumentation/filesystems/qnx6.txt | 4++--
MDocumentation/filesystems/spufs.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/vfs.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/xfs-self-describing-metadata.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/filesystems/xfs.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/gpu/drm-uapi.rst | 4++--
MDocumentation/leds/leds-class.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/media/uapi/v4l/extended-controls.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/memory-barriers.txt | 22+++++++++++-----------
MDocumentation/networking/device_drivers/dec/de4x5.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/networking/rxrpc.txt | 10+++++-----
MDocumentation/power/regulator/overview.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/process/1.Intro.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/process/4.Coding.rst | 3++-
MDocumentation/process/5.Posting.rst | 23+++++++++++++----------
MDocumentation/process/8.Conclusion.rst | 7++++---
MDocumentation/process/adding-syscalls.rst | 3+++
MDocumentation/process/changes.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/process/coding-style.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/process/howto.rst | 13++++++++-----
MDocumentation/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst | 4+++-
MDocumentation/process/magic-number.rst | 2++
MDocumentation/process/management-style.rst | 5+++--
MDocumentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst | 8+++++---
MDocumentation/s390/3270.ChangeLog | 2+-
MDocumentation/security/credentials.rst | 8++++----
MDocumentation/security/keys/request-key.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/sound/soc/dai.rst | 6+++---
MDocumentation/sound/soc/dpcm.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/static-keys.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/thermal/power_allocator.txt | 2+-
MDocumentation/trace/ftrace.rst | 14+++++++-------
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/README.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst | 12++++++++++++
MDocumentation/translations/it_IT/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst | 2+-
MDocumentation/translations/it_IT/index.rst | 1+
MDocumentation/translations/it_IT/kernel-hacking/locking.rst | 4++--
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/1.Intro.rst | 297+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/2.Process.rst | 531+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/3.Early-stage.rst | 241+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/4.Coding.rst | 447+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/5.Posting.rst | 348+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/6.Followthrough.rst | 240+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/7.AdvancedTopics.rst | 191+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/8.Conclusion.rst | 85+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/adding-syscalls.rst | 643+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/applying-patches.rst | 13+++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/changes.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/clang-format.rst | 197+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/code-of-conduct.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/coding-style.rst | 1094+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/development-process.rst | 33+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/email-clients.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/howto.rst | 655+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/index.rst | 67+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-docs.rst | 13+++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst | 211+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst | 13+++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/magic-number.rst | 170+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/maintainer-pgp-guide.rst | 13+++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/management-style.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-api-nonsense.rst | 13+++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/submit-checklist.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-drivers.rst | 12++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst | 13+++++++++++++
ADocumentation/translations/it_IT/process/volatile-considered-harmful.rst | 134+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
MDocumentation/vm/index.rst | 4+++-
MDocumentation/x86/boot.txt | 2+-
Minclude/linux/slab.h | 55+++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------------
Mmm/slab_common.c | 35+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----
Mscripts/kernel-doc | 13+++++++------
120 files changed, 7553 insertions(+), 1519 deletions(-)

diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/1024x768.S b/Documentation/EDID/1024x768.S @@ -31,14 +31,13 @@ #define YBLANK 38 #define XOFFSET 8 #define XPULSE 144 -#define YOFFSET (63+3) -#define YPULSE (63+6) +#define YOFFSET 3 +#define YPULSE 6 #define DPI 72 #define VFREQ 60 /* Hz */ #define TIMING_NAME "Linux XGA" #define ESTABLISHED_TIMING2_BITS 0x08 /* Bit 3 -> 1024x768 @60 Hz */ #define HSYNC_POL 0 #define VSYNC_POL 0 -#define CRC 0x55 #include "edid.S" diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/1280x1024.S b/Documentation/EDID/1280x1024.S @@ -31,14 +31,13 @@ #define YBLANK 42 #define XOFFSET 48 #define XPULSE 112 -#define YOFFSET (63+1) -#define YPULSE (63+3) +#define YOFFSET 1 +#define YPULSE 3 #define DPI 72 #define VFREQ 60 /* Hz */ #define TIMING_NAME "Linux SXGA" /* No ESTABLISHED_TIMINGx_BITS */ #define HSYNC_POL 1 #define VSYNC_POL 1 -#define CRC 0xa0 #include "edid.S" diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/1600x1200.S b/Documentation/EDID/1600x1200.S @@ -31,14 +31,13 @@ #define YBLANK 50 #define XOFFSET 64 #define XPULSE 192 -#define YOFFSET (63+1) -#define YPULSE (63+3) +#define YOFFSET 1 +#define YPULSE 3 #define DPI 72 #define VFREQ 60 /* Hz */ #define TIMING_NAME "Linux UXGA" /* No ESTABLISHED_TIMINGx_BITS */ #define HSYNC_POL 1 #define VSYNC_POL 1 -#define CRC 0x9d #include "edid.S" diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/1680x1050.S b/Documentation/EDID/1680x1050.S @@ -31,14 +31,13 @@ #define YBLANK 39 #define XOFFSET 104 #define XPULSE 176 -#define YOFFSET (63+3) -#define YPULSE (63+6) +#define YOFFSET 3 +#define YPULSE 6 #define DPI 96 #define VFREQ 60 /* Hz */ #define TIMING_NAME "Linux WSXGA" /* No ESTABLISHED_TIMINGx_BITS */ #define HSYNC_POL 1 #define VSYNC_POL 1 -#define CRC 0x26 #include "edid.S" diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/1920x1080.S b/Documentation/EDID/1920x1080.S @@ -31,14 +31,13 @@ #define YBLANK 45 #define XOFFSET 88 #define XPULSE 44 -#define YOFFSET (63+4) -#define YPULSE (63+5) +#define YOFFSET 4 +#define YPULSE 5 #define DPI 96 #define VFREQ 60 /* Hz */ #define TIMING_NAME "Linux FHD" /* No ESTABLISHED_TIMINGx_BITS */ #define HSYNC_POL 1 #define VSYNC_POL 1 -#define CRC 0x05 #include "edid.S" diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/800x600.S b/Documentation/EDID/800x600.S @@ -28,14 +28,13 @@ #define YBLANK 28 #define XOFFSET 40 #define XPULSE 128 -#define YOFFSET (63+1) -#define YPULSE (63+4) +#define YOFFSET 1 +#define YPULSE 4 #define DPI 72 #define VFREQ 60 /* Hz */ #define TIMING_NAME "Linux SVGA" #define ESTABLISHED_TIMING1_BITS 0x01 /* Bit 0: 800x600 @ 60Hz */ #define HSYNC_POL 1 #define VSYNC_POL 1 -#define CRC 0xc2 #include "edid.S" diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/HOWTO.txt b/Documentation/EDID/HOWTO.txt @@ -45,14 +45,5 @@ EDID: #define YPIX vdisp #define YBLANK vtotal-vdisp -#define YOFFSET (63+(vsyncstart-vdisp)) -#define YPULSE (63+(vsyncend-vsyncstart)) - -The CRC value in the last line - #define CRC 0x55 -also is a bit tricky. After a first version of the binary data set is -created, it must be checked with the "edid-decode" utility which will -most probably complain about a wrong CRC. Fortunately, the utility also -displays the correct CRC which must then be inserted into the source -file. After the make procedure is repeated, the EDID data set is ready -to be used. +#define YOFFSET vsyncstart-vdisp +#define YPULSE vsyncend-vsyncstart diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/Makefile b/Documentation/EDID/Makefile @@ -15,10 +15,21 @@ clean: %.o: %.S @cc -c $^ -%.bin: %.o +%.bin.nocrc: %.o @objcopy -Obinary $^ $@ -%.bin.ihex: %.o +%.crc: %.bin.nocrc + @list=$$(for i in `seq 1 127`; do head -c$$i $^ | tail -c1 \ + | hexdump -v -e '/1 "%02X+"'; done); \ + echo "ibase=16;100-($${list%?})%100" | bc >$@ + +%.p: %.crc %.S + @cc -c -DCRC="$$(cat $*.crc)" -o $@ $*.S + +%.bin: %.p + @objcopy -Obinary $^ $@ + +%.bin.ihex: %.p @objcopy -Oihex $^ $@ @dos2unix $@ 2>/dev/null diff --git a/Documentation/EDID/edid.S b/Documentation/EDID/edid.S @@ -47,9 +47,11 @@ #define mfgname2id(v1,v2,v3) \ ((((v1-'@')&0x1f)<<10)+(((v2-'@')&0x1f)<<5)+((v3-'@')&0x1f)) #define swap16(v1) ((v1>>8)+((v1&0xff)<<8)) +#define lsbs2(v1,v2) (((v1&0x0f)<<4)+(v2&0x0f)) #define msbs2(v1,v2) ((((v1>>8)&0x0f)<<4)+((v2>>8)&0x0f)) #define msbs4(v1,v2,v3,v4) \ - (((v1&0x03)>>2)+((v2&0x03)>>4)+((v3&0x03)>>6)+((v4&0x03)>>8)) + ((((v1>>8)&0x03)<<6)+(((v2>>8)&0x03)<<4)+\ + (((v3>>4)&0x03)<<2)+((v4>>4)&0x03)) #define pixdpi2mm(pix,dpi) ((pix*25)/dpi) #define xsize pixdpi2mm(XPIX,DPI) #define ysize pixdpi2mm(YPIX,DPI) @@ -200,9 +202,9 @@ y_msbs: .byte msbs2(YPIX,YBLANK) x_snc_off_lsb: .byte XOFFSET&0xff /* Horizontal sync pulse width pixels 8 lsbits (0-1023) */ x_snc_pls_lsb: .byte XPULSE&0xff -/* Bits 7-4 Vertical sync offset lines 4 lsbits -63) - Bits 3-0 Vertical sync pulse width lines 4 lsbits -63) */ -y_snc_lsb: .byte ((YOFFSET-63)<<4)+(YPULSE-63) +/* Bits 7-4 Vertical sync offset lines 4 lsbits (0-63) + Bits 3-0 Vertical sync pulse width lines 4 lsbits (0-63) */ +y_snc_lsb: .byte lsbs2(YOFFSET, YPULSE) /* Bits 7-6 Horizontal sync offset pixels 2 msbits Bits 5-4 Horizontal sync pulse width pixels 2 msbits Bits 3-2 Vertical sync offset lines 2 msbits diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/devices.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/devices.rst @@ -1,3 +1,4 @@ +.. _admin_devices: Linux allocated devices (4.x+ version) ====================================== diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/dynamic-debug-howto.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/dynamic-debug-howto.rst @@ -110,8 +110,8 @@ If your query set is big, you can batch them too:: ~# cat query-batch-file > <debugfs>/dynamic_debug/control -A another way is to use wildcard. The match rule support ``*`` (matches -zero or more characters) and ``?`` (matches exactly one character).For +Another way is to use wildcards. The match rule supports ``*`` (matches +zero or more characters) and ``?`` (matches exactly one character). For example, you can match all usb drivers:: ~# echo "file drivers/usb/* +p" > <debugfs>/dynamic_debug/control @@ -258,7 +258,7 @@ this boot parameter for debugging purposes. If ``foo`` module is not built-in, ``foo.dyndbg`` will still be processed at boot time, without effect, but will be reprocessed when module is -loaded later. ``dyndbg_query=`` and bare ``dyndbg=`` are only processed at +loaded later. ``ddebug_query=`` and bare ``dyndbg=`` are only processed at boot. @@ -301,7 +301,7 @@ The ``dyndbg`` option is a "fake" module parameter, which means: For ``CONFIG_DYNAMIC_DEBUG`` kernels, any settings given at boot-time (or enabled by ``-DDEBUG`` flag during compilation) can be disabled later via -the sysfs interface if the debug messages are no longer needed:: +the debugfs interface if the debug messages are no longer needed:: echo "module module_name -p" > <debugfs>/dynamic_debug/control diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/index.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/index.rst @@ -76,6 +76,7 @@ configure specific aspects of kernel behavior to your liking. thunderbolt LSM/index mm/index + perf-security .. only:: subproject and html diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt b/Documentation/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.txt @@ -331,7 +331,7 @@ APC and your system crashes randomly. apic= [APIC,X86] Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller - Change the output verbosity whilst booting + Change the output verbosity while booting Format: { quiet (default) | verbose | debug } Change the amount of debugging information output when initialising the APIC and IO-APIC components. diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/mm/concepts.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/mm/concepts.rst @@ -4,13 +4,13 @@ Concepts overview ================= -The memory management in Linux is complex system that evolved over the -years and included more and more functionality to support variety of +The memory management in Linux is a complex system that evolved over the +years and included more and more functionality to support a variety of systems from MMU-less microcontrollers to supercomputers. The memory -management for systems without MMU is called ``nommu`` and it +management for systems without an MMU is called ``nommu`` and it definitely deserves a dedicated document, which hopefully will be eventually written. Yet, although some of the concepts are the same, -here we assume that MMU is available and CPU can translate a virtual +here we assume that an MMU is available and a CPU can translate a virtual address to a physical address. .. contents:: :local: @@ -21,10 +21,10 @@ Virtual Memory Primer The physical memory in a computer system is a limited resource and even for systems that support memory hotplug there is a hard limit on the amount of memory that can be installed. The physical memory is not -necessary contiguous, it might be accessible as a set of distinct +necessarily contiguous; it might be accessible as a set of distinct address ranges. Besides, different CPU architectures, and even -different implementations of the same architecture have different view -how these address ranges defined. +different implementations of the same architecture have different views +of how these address ranges are defined. All this makes dealing directly with physical memory quite complex and to avoid this complexity a concept of virtual memory was developed. @@ -48,8 +48,8 @@ appropriate kernel configuration option. Each physical memory page can be mapped as one or more virtual pages. These mappings are described by page tables that allow -translation from virtual address used by programs to real address in -the physical memory. The page tables organized hierarchically. +translation from a virtual address used by programs to the physical +memory address. The page tables are organized hierarchically. The tables at the lowest level of the hierarchy contain physical addresses of actual pages used by the software. The tables at higher @@ -121,8 +121,8 @@ Nodes Many multi-processor machines are NUMA - Non-Uniform Memory Access - systems. In such systems the memory is arranged into banks that have different access latency depending on the "distance" from the -processor. Each bank is referred as `node` and for each node Linux -constructs an independent memory management subsystem. A node has it's +processor. Each bank is referred to as a `node` and for each node Linux +constructs an independent memory management subsystem. A node has its own set of zones, lists of free and used pages and various statistics counters. You can find more details about NUMA in :ref:`Documentation/vm/numa.rst <numa>` and in @@ -149,9 +149,9 @@ for program's stack and heap or by explicit calls to mmap(2) system call. Usually, the anonymous mappings only define virtual memory areas that the program is allowed to access. The read accesses will result in creation of a page table entry that references a special physical -page filled with zeroes. When the program performs a write, regular +page filled with zeroes. When the program performs a write, a regular physical page will be allocated to hold the written data. The page -will be marked dirty and if the kernel will decide to repurpose it, +will be marked dirty and if the kernel decides to repurpose it, the dirty page will be swapped out. Reclaim @@ -181,8 +181,8 @@ pressure. The process of freeing the reclaimable physical memory pages and repurposing them is called (surprise!) `reclaim`. Linux can reclaim pages either asynchronously or synchronously, depending on the state -of the system. When system is not loaded, most of the memory is free -and allocation request will be satisfied immediately from the free +of the system. When the system is not loaded, most of the memory is free +and allocation requests will be satisfied immediately from the free pages supply. As the load increases, the amount of the free pages goes down and when it reaches a certain threshold (high watermark), an allocation request will awaken the ``kswapd`` daemon. It will @@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ asynchronously scan memory pages and either just free them if the data they contain is available elsewhere, or evict to the backing storage device (remember those dirty pages?). As memory usage increases even more and reaches another threshold - min watermark - an allocation -will trigger the `direct reclaim`. In this case allocation is stalled +will trigger `direct reclaim`. In this case allocation is stalled until enough memory pages are reclaimed to satisfy the request. Compaction @@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ As the system runs, tasks allocate and free the memory and it becomes fragmented. Although with virtual memory it is possible to present scattered physical pages as virtually contiguous range, sometimes it is necessary to allocate large physically contiguous memory areas. Such -need may arise, for instance, when a device driver requires large +need may arise, for instance, when a device driver requires a large buffer for DMA, or when THP allocates a huge page. Memory `compaction` addresses the fragmentation issue. This mechanism moves occupied pages from the lower part of a memory zone to free pages in the upper part @@ -208,15 +208,16 @@ of the zone. When a compaction scan is finished free pages are grouped together at the beginning of the zone and allocations of large physically contiguous areas become possible. -Like reclaim, the compaction may happen asynchronously in ``kcompactd`` -daemon or synchronously as a result of memory allocation request. +Like reclaim, the compaction may happen asynchronously in the ``kcompactd`` +daemon or synchronously as a result of a memory allocation request. OOM killer ========== -It may happen, that on a loaded machine memory will be exhausted. When -the kernel detects that the system runs out of memory (OOM) it invokes -`OOM killer`. Its mission is simple: all it has to do is to select a -task to sacrifice for the sake of the overall system health. The -selected task is killed in a hope that after it exits enough memory -will be freed to continue normal operation. +It is possible that on a loaded machine memory will be exhausted and the +kernel will be unable to reclaim enough memory to continue to operate. In +order to save the rest of the system, it invokes the `OOM killer`. + +The `OOM killer` selects a task to sacrifice for the sake of the overall +system health. The selected task is killed in a hope that after it exits +enough memory will be freed to continue normal operation. diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/perf-security.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/perf-security.rst @@ -0,0 +1,97 @@ +.. _perf_security: + +Perf Events and tool security +============================= + +Overview +-------- + +Usage of Performance Counters for Linux (perf_events) [1]_ , [2]_ , [3]_ can +impose a considerable risk of leaking sensitive data accessed by monitored +processes. The data leakage is possible both in scenarios of direct usage of +perf_events system call API [2]_ and over data files generated by Perf tool user +mode utility (Perf) [3]_ , [4]_ . The risk depends on the nature of data that +perf_events performance monitoring units (PMU) [2]_ collect and expose for +performance analysis. Having that said perf_events/Perf performance monitoring +is the subject for security access control management [5]_ . + +perf_events/Perf access control +------------------------------- + +To perform security checks, the Linux implementation splits processes into two +categories [6]_ : a) privileged processes (whose effective user ID is 0, referred +to as superuser or root), and b) unprivileged processes (whose effective UID is +nonzero). Privileged processes bypass all kernel security permission checks so +perf_events performance monitoring is fully available to privileged processes +without access, scope and resource restrictions. + +Unprivileged processes are subject to a full security permission check based on +the process's credentials [5]_ (usually: effective UID, effective GID, and +supplementary group list). + +Linux divides the privileges traditionally associated with superuser into +distinct units, known as capabilities [6]_ , which can be independently enabled +and disabled on per-thread basis for processes and files of unprivileged users. + +Unprivileged processes with enabled CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability are treated as +privileged processes with respect to perf_events performance monitoring and +bypass *scope* permissions checks in the kernel. + +Unprivileged processes using perf_events system call API is also subject for +PTRACE_MODE_READ_REALCREDS ptrace access mode check [7]_ , whose outcome +determines whether monitoring is permitted. So unprivileged processes provided +with CAP_SYS_PTRACE capability are effectively permitted to pass the check. + +Other capabilities being granted to unprivileged processes can effectively +enable capturing of additional data required for later performance analysis of +monitored processes or a system. For example, CAP_SYSLOG capability permits +reading kernel space memory addresses from /proc/kallsyms file. + +perf_events/Perf unprivileged users +----------------------------------- + +perf_events/Perf *scope* and *access* control for unprivileged processes is +governed by perf_event_paranoid [2]_ setting: + +-1: + Impose no *scope* and *access* restrictions on using perf_events performance + monitoring. Per-user per-cpu perf_event_mlock_kb [2]_ locking limit is + ignored when allocating memory buffers for storing performance data. + This is the least secure mode since allowed monitored *scope* is + maximized and no perf_events specific limits are imposed on *resources* + allocated for performance monitoring. + +>=0: + *scope* includes per-process and system wide performance monitoring + but excludes raw tracepoints and ftrace function tracepoints monitoring. + CPU and system events happened when executing either in user or + in kernel space can be monitored and captured for later analysis. + Per-user per-cpu perf_event_mlock_kb locking limit is imposed but + ignored for unprivileged processes with CAP_IPC_LOCK [6]_ capability. + +>=1: + *scope* includes per-process performance monitoring only and excludes + system wide performance monitoring. CPU and system events happened when + executing either in user or in kernel space can be monitored and + captured for later analysis. Per-user per-cpu perf_event_mlock_kb + locking limit is imposed but ignored for unprivileged processes with + CAP_IPC_LOCK capability. + +>=2: + *scope* includes per-process performance monitoring only. CPU and system + events happened when executing in user space only can be monitored and + captured for later analysis. Per-user per-cpu perf_event_mlock_kb + locking limit is imposed but ignored for unprivileged processes with + CAP_IPC_LOCK capability. + +Bibliography +------------ + +.. [1] `<https://lwn.net/Articles/337493/>`_ +.. [2] `<http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/perf_event_open.2.html>`_ +.. [3] `<http://web.eece.maine.edu/~vweaver/projects/perf_events/>`_ +.. [4] `<https://perf.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page>`_ +.. [5] `<https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/security/credentials.html>`_ +.. [6] `<http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/capabilities.7.html>`_ +.. [7] `<http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/ptrace.2.html>`_ + diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/ras.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/ras.rst @@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ those errors are correctable. Types of errors --------------- -Most mechanisms used on modern systems use use technologies like Hamming +Most mechanisms used on modern systems use technologies like Hamming Codes that allow error correction when the number of errors on a bit packet is below a threshold. If the number of errors is above, those mechanisms can indicate with a high degree of confidence that an error happened, but diff --git a/Documentation/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst b/Documentation/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst @@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ only valid reason for deferring the publication of a fix is to accommodate the logistics of QA and large scale rollouts which require release coordination. -Whilst embargoed information may be shared with trusted individuals in +While embargoed information may be shared with trusted individuals in order to develop a fix, such information will not be published alongside the fix or on any other disclosure channel without the permission of the reporter. This includes but is not limited to the original bug report diff --git a/Documentation/arm/Booting b/Documentation/arm/Booting @@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ tagged list. The boot loader must pass at a minimum the size and location of the system memory, and the root filesystem location. The dtb must be placed in a region of memory where the kernel decompressor will not -overwrite it, whilst remaining within the region which will be covered +overwrite it, while remaining within the region which will be covered by the kernel's low-memory mapping. A safe location is just above the 128MiB boundary from start of RAM. diff --git a/Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/GPIO.txt b/Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/GPIO.txt @@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ out s3c2410 API, then here are some notes on the process. as they have the same arguments, and can either take the pin specific values, or the more generic special-function-number arguments. -3) s3c2410_gpio_pullup() changes have the problem that whilst the +3) s3c2410_gpio_pullup() changes have the problem that while the s3c2410_gpio_pullup(x, 1) can be easily translated to the s3c_gpio_setpull(x, S3C_GPIO_PULL_NONE), the s3c2410_gpio_pullup(x, 0) are not so easy. diff --git a/Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/Overview.txt b/Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/Overview.txt @@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ Introduction versions. The S3C2416 and S3C2450 devices are very similar and S3C2450 support is - included under the arch/arm/mach-s3c2416 directory. Note, whilst core + included under the arch/arm/mach-s3c2416 directory. Note, while core support for these SoCs is in, work on some of the extra peripherals and extra interrupts is still ongoing. diff --git a/Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/Suspend.txt b/Documentation/arm/Samsung-S3C24XX/Suspend.txt @@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ Debugging suspending, which means that use of printascii() or similar direct access to the UARTs will cause the debug to stop. - 2) Whilst the pm code itself will attempt to re-enable the UART clocks, + 2) While the pm code itself will attempt to re-enable the UART clocks, care should be taken that any external clock sources that the UARTs rely on are still enabled at that point. diff --git a/Documentation/core-api/assoc_array.rst b/Documentation/core-api/assoc_array.rst @@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ properties: 8. The array can iterated over. The objects will not necessarily come out in key order. -9. The array can be iterated over whilst it is being modified, provided the +9. The array can be iterated over while it is being modified, provided the RCU readlock is being held by the iterator. Note, however, under these circumstances, some objects may be seen more than once. If this is a problem, the iterator should lock against modification. Objects will not @@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ properties: 10. Objects in the array can be looked up by means of their index key. -11. Objects can be looked up whilst the array is being modified, provided the +11. Objects can be looked up while the array is being modified, provided the RCU readlock is being held by the thread doing the look up. The implementation uses a tree of 16-pointer nodes internally that are indexed @@ -273,7 +273,7 @@ The function will return ``0`` if successful and ``-ENOMEM`` if there wasn't enough memory. It is possible for other threads to iterate over or search the array under -the RCU read lock whilst this function is in progress. The caller should +the RCU read lock while this function is in progress. The caller should lock exclusively against other modifiers of the array. diff --git a/Documentation/core-api/memory-allocation.rst b/Documentation/core-api/memory-allocation.rst @@ -1,3 +1,5 @@ +.. _memory-allocation: + ======================= Memory Allocation Guide ======================= diff --git a/Documentation/core-api/mm-api.rst b/Documentation/core-api/mm-api.rst @@ -46,11 +46,20 @@ The Slab Cache .. kernel-doc:: mm/slab.c :export: +.. kernel-doc:: mm/slab_common.c + :export: + .. kernel-doc:: mm/util.c :functions: kfree_const kvmalloc_node kvfree -More Memory Management Functions -================================ +Virtually Contiguous Mappings +============================= + +.. kernel-doc:: mm/vmalloc.c + :export: + +File Mapping and Page Cache +=========================== .. kernel-doc:: mm/readahead.c :export: @@ -58,23 +67,28 @@ More Memory Management Functions .. kernel-doc:: mm/filemap.c :export: -.. kernel-doc:: mm/memory.c +.. kernel-doc:: mm/page-writeback.c :export: -.. kernel-doc:: mm/vmalloc.c +.. kernel-doc:: mm/truncate.c :export: -.. kernel-doc:: mm/page_alloc.c - :internal: +Memory pools +============ .. kernel-doc:: mm/mempool.c :export: +DMA pools +========= + .. kernel-doc:: mm/dmapool.c :export: -.. kernel-doc:: mm/page-writeback.c - :export: +More Memory Management Functions +================================ -.. kernel-doc:: mm/truncate.c +.. kernel-doc:: mm/memory.c :export: + +.. kernel-doc:: mm/page_alloc.c diff --git a/Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst b/Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst @@ -4,6 +4,8 @@ .. highlight:: none +.. _devtools_coccinelle: + Coccinelle ========== diff --git a/Documentation/dev-tools/index.rst b/Documentation/dev-tools/index.rst @@ -3,8 +3,8 @@ Development tools for the kernel ================================ This document is a collection of documents about development tools that can -be used to work on the kernel. For now, the documents have been pulled -together without any significant effot to integrate them into a coherent +be used to work on the kernel. For now, the documents have been pulled +together without any significant effort to integrate them into a coherent whole; patches welcome! .. class:: toc-title diff --git a/Documentation/dev-tools/kselftest.rst b/Documentation/dev-tools/kselftest.rst @@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ and booting a kernel. On some systems, hot-plug tests could hang forever waiting for cpu and memory to be ready to be offlined. A special hot-plug target is created -to run full range of hot-plug tests. In default mode, hot-plug tests run +to run the full range of hot-plug tests. In default mode, hot-plug tests run in safe mode with a limited scope. In limited mode, cpu-hotplug test is run on a single cpu as opposed to all hotplug capable cpus, and memory hotplug test is run on 2% of hotplug capable memory instead of 10%. @@ -89,9 +89,9 @@ Note that some tests will require root privileges. Install selftests ================= -You can use kselftest_install.sh tool installs selftests in default -location which is tools/testing/selftests/kselftest or a user specified -location. +You can use the kselftest_install.sh tool to install selftests in the +default location, which is tools/testing/selftests/kselftest, or in a +user specified location. To install selftests in default location:: @@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ Running installed selftests Kselftest install as well as the Kselftest tarball provide a script named "run_kselftest.sh" to run the tests. -You can simply do the following to run the installed Kselftests. Please +You can simply do the following to run the installed Kselftests. Please note some tests will require root privileges:: $ cd kselftest @@ -139,7 +139,7 @@ Contributing new tests (details) default. TEST_CUSTOM_PROGS should be used by tests that require custom build - rule and prevent common build rule use. + rules and prevent common build rule use. TEST_PROGS are for test shell scripts. Please ensure shell script has its exec bit set. Otherwise, lib.mk run_tests will generate a warning. diff --git a/Documentation/device-mapper/dm-raid.txt b/Documentation/device-mapper/dm-raid.txt @@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ The target is named "raid" and it accepts the following parameters: [data_offset <sectors>] This option value defines the offset into each data device where the data starts. This is used to provide out-of-place - reshaping space to avoid writing over data whilst + reshaping space to avoid writing over data while changing the layout of stripes, hence an interruption/crash may happen at any time without the risk of losing data. E.g. when adding devices to an existing raid set during diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/arm/idle-states.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/arm/idle-states.txt @@ -142,7 +142,7 @@ characterised by the following graph: The graph is split in two parts delimited by time 1ms on the X-axis. The graph curve with X-axis values = { x | 0 < x < 1ms } has a steep slope -and denotes the energy costs incurred whilst entering and leaving the idle +and denotes the energy costs incurred while entering and leaving the idle state. The graph curve in the area delimited by X-axis values = {x | x > 1ms } has shallower slope and essentially represents the energy consumption of the idle diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/pci/host-generic-pci.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/pci/host-generic-pci.txt @@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ For CAM, this 24-bit offset is: cfg_offset(bus, device, function, register) = bus << 16 | device << 11 | function << 8 | register -Whilst ECAM extends this by 4 bits to accommodate 4k of function space: +While ECAM extends this by 4 bits to accommodate 4k of function space: cfg_offset(bus, device, function, register) = bus << 20 | device << 15 | function << 12 | register diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/serial/rs485.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/serial/rs485.txt @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Optional properties: - linux,rs485-enabled-at-boot-time: empty property telling to enable the rs485 feature at boot time. It can be disabled later with proper ioctl. - rs485-rx-during-tx: empty property that enables the receiving of data even - whilst sending data. + while sending data. RS485 example for Atmel USART: usart0: serial@fff8c000 { diff --git a/Documentation/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst b/Documentation/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst @@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ The general format of a function and function-like macro kernel-doc comment is:: * Context: Describes whether the function can sleep, what locks it takes, * releases, or expects to be held. It can extend over multiple * lines. - * Return: Describe the return value of foobar. + * Return: Describe the return value of function_name. * * The return value description can also have multiple paragraphs, and should * be placed at the end of the comment block. diff --git a/Documentation/doc-guide/sphinx.rst b/Documentation/doc-guide/sphinx.rst @@ -1,3 +1,5 @@ +.. _sphinxdoc: + Introduction ============ diff --git a/Documentation/driver-api/dmaengine/dmatest.rst b/Documentation/driver-api/dmaengine/dmatest.rst @@ -11,6 +11,10 @@ This small document introduces how to test DMA drivers using dmatest module. capability of the following: DMA_MEMCPY (memory-to-memory), DMA_MEMSET (const-to-memory or memory-to-memory, when emulated), DMA_XOR, DMA_PQ. +.. note:: + In case of any related questions use the official mailing list + dmaengine@vger.kernel.org. + Part 1 - How to build the test module ===================================== diff --git a/Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst b/Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst @@ -6,6 +6,8 @@ .. |struct wakeup_source| replace:: :c:type:`struct wakeup_source <wakeup_source>` .. |struct device| replace:: :c:type:`struct device <device>` +.. _driverapi_pm_devices: + ============================== Device Power Management Basics ============================== diff --git a/Documentation/driver-model/devres.txt b/Documentation/driver-model/devres.txt @@ -132,6 +132,13 @@ devres. Complexity is shifted from less maintained low level drivers to better maintained higher layer. Also, as init failure path is shared with exit path, both can get more testing. +Note though that when converting current calls or assignments to +managed devm_* versions it is up to you to check if internal operations +like allocating memory, have failed. Managed resources pertains to the +freeing of these resources *only* - all other checks needed are still +on you. In some cases this may mean introducing checks that were not +necessary before moving to the managed devm_* calls. + 3. Devres group --------------- diff --git a/Documentation/early-userspace/README b/Documentation/early-userspace/README @@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ user root (0). INITRAMFS_ROOT_GID can be set to a group ID that needs to be mapped to group root (0). A source file must be directives in the format required by the -usr/gen_init_cpio utility (run 'usr/gen_init_cpio --help' to get the +usr/gen_init_cpio utility (run 'usr/gen_init_cpio -h' to get the file format). The directives in the file will be passed directly to usr/gen_init_cpio. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/backend-api.txt @@ -704,7 +704,7 @@ FS-Cache provides some utilities that a cache backend may make use of: void fscache_get_retrieval(struct fscache_retrieval *op); void fscache_put_retrieval(struct fscache_retrieval *op); - These two functions are used to retain a retrieval record whilst doing + These two functions are used to retain a retrieval record while doing asynchronous data retrieval and block allocation. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/cachefiles.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/cachefiles.txt @@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ filesystems are very specific in nature. CacheFiles creates a misc character device - "/dev/cachefiles" - that is used to communication with the daemon. Only one thing may have this open at once, -and whilst it is open, a cache is at least partially in existence. The daemon +and while it is open, a cache is at least partially in existence. The daemon opens this and sends commands down it to control the cache. CacheFiles is currently limited to a single cache. @@ -163,7 +163,7 @@ Do not mount other things within the cache as this will cause problems. The kernel module contains its own very cut-down path walking facility that ignores mountpoints, but the daemon can't avoid them. -Do not create, rename or unlink files and directories in the cache whilst the +Do not create, rename or unlink files and directories in the cache while the cache is active, as this may cause the state to become uncertain. Renaming files in the cache might make objects appear to be other objects (the diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/netfs-api.txt @@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ MISCELLANEOUS OBJECT REGISTRATION An optional step is to request an object of miscellaneous type be created in the cache. This is almost identical to index cookie acquisition. The only difference is that the type in the object definition should be something other -than index type. Whilst the parent object could be an index, it's more likely +than index type. While the parent object could be an index, it's more likely it would be some other type of object such as a data file. xattr->cache = diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/caching/operations.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/caching/operations.txt @@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ Operations are used through the following procedure: (3) If the submitting thread wants to do the work itself, and has marked the operation with FSCACHE_OP_MYTHREAD, then it should monitor FSCACHE_OP_WAITING as described above and check the state of the object if - necessary (the object might have died whilst the thread was waiting). + necessary (the object might have died while the thread was waiting). When it has finished doing its processing, it should call fscache_op_complete() and fscache_put_operation() on it. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/configfs/configfs.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/configfs/configfs.txt @@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ be called whenever userspace asks for a write(2) on the attribute. [struct configfs_bin_attribute] - struct configfs_attribute { + struct configfs_bin_attribute { struct configfs_attribute cb_attr; void *cb_private; size_t cb_max_size; diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/index.rst b/Documentation/filesystems/index.rst @@ -359,3 +359,24 @@ encryption of files and directories. :maxdepth: 2 fscrypt + +Pathname lookup +=============== + + +This write-up is based on three articles published at lwn.net: + +- <https://lwn.net/Articles/649115/> Pathname lookup in Linux +- <https://lwn.net/Articles/649729/> RCU-walk: faster pathname lookup in Linux +- <https://lwn.net/Articles/650786/> A walk among the symlinks + +Written by Neil Brown with help from Al Viro and Jon Corbet. +It has subsequently been updated to reflect changes in the kernel +including: + +- per-directory parallel name lookup. + +.. toctree:: + :maxdepth: 2 + + path-lookup.rst diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/path-lookup.md b/Documentation/filesystems/path-lookup.md @@ -1,1297 +0,0 @@ -<head> -<style> p { max-width:50em} ol, ul {max-width: 40em}</style> -</head> - -Pathname lookup in Linux. -========================= - -This write-up is based on three articles published at lwn.net: - -- <https://lwn.net/Articles/649115/> Pathname lookup in Linux -- <https://lwn.net/Articles/649729/> RCU-walk: faster pathname lookup in Linux -- <https://lwn.net/Articles/650786/> A walk among the symlinks - -Written by Neil Brown with help from Al Viro and Jon Corbet. - -Introduction ------------- - -The most obvious aspect of pathname lookup, which very little -exploration is needed to discover, is that it is complex. There are -many rules, special cases, and implementation alternatives that all -combine to confuse the unwary reader. Computer science has long been -acquainted with such complexity and has tools to help manage it. One -tool that we will make extensive use of is "divide and conquer". For -the early parts of the analysis we will divide off symlinks - leaving -them until the final part. Well before we get to symlinks we have -another major division based on the VFS's approach to locking which -will allow us to review "REF-walk" and "RCU-walk" separately. But we -are getting ahead of ourselves. There are some important low level -distinctions we need to clarify first. - -There are two sorts of ... --------------------------- - -[`openat()`]: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/openat.2.html - -Pathnames (sometimes "file names"), used to identify objects in the -filesystem, will be familiar to most readers. They contain two sorts -of elements: "slashes" that are sequences of one or more "`/`" -characters, and "components" that are sequences of one or more -non-"`/`" characters. These form two kinds of paths. Those that -start with slashes are "absolute" and start from the filesystem root. -The others are "relative" and start from the current directory, or -from some other location specified by a file descriptor given to a -"xxx`at`" system call such as "[`openat()`]". - -[`execveat()`]: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/execveat.2.html - -It is tempting to describe the second kind as starting with a -component, but that isn't always accurate: a pathname can lack both -slashes and components, it can be empty, in other words. This is -generally forbidden in POSIX, but some of those "xxx`at`" system calls -in Linux permit it when the `AT_EMPTY_PATH` flag is given. For -example, if you have an open file descriptor on an executable file you -can execute it by calling [`execveat()`] passing the file descriptor, -an empty path, and the `AT_EMPTY_PATH` flag. - -These paths can be divided into two sections: the final component and -everything else. The "everything else" is the easy bit. In all cases -it must identify a directory that already exists, otherwise an error -such as `ENOENT` or `ENOTDIR` will be reported. - -The final component is not so simple. Not only do different system -calls interpret it quite differently (e.g. some create it, some do -not), but it might not even exist: neither the empty pathname nor the -pathname that is just slashes have a final component. If it does -exist, it could be "`.`" or "`..`" which are handled quite differently -from other components. - -[POSIX]: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/V1_chap04.html#tag_04_12 - -If a pathname ends with a slash, such as "`/tmp/foo/`" it might be -tempting to consider that to have an empty final component. In many -ways that would lead to correct results, but not always. In -particular, `mkdir()` and `rmdir()` each create or remove a directory named -by the final component, and they are required to work with pathnames -ending in "`/`". According to [POSIX] - -> A pathname that contains at least one non- &lt;slash> character and -> that ends with one or more trailing &lt;slash> characters shall not -> be resolved successfully unless the last pathname component before -> the trailing <slash> characters names an existing directory or a -> directory entry that is to be created for a directory immediately -> after the pathname is resolved. - -The Linux pathname walking code (mostly in `fs/namei.c`) deals with -all of these issues: breaking the path into components, handling the -"everything else" quite separately from the final component, and -checking that the trailing slash is not used where it isn't -permitted. It also addresses the important issue of concurrent -access. - -While one process is looking up a pathname, another might be making -changes that affect that lookup. One fairly extreme case is that if -"a/b" were renamed to "a/c/b" while another process were looking up -"a/b/..", that process might successfully resolve on "a/c". -Most races are much more subtle, and a big part of the task of -pathname lookup is to prevent them from having damaging effects. Many -of the possible races are seen most clearly in the context of the -"dcache" and an understanding of that is central to understanding -pathname lookup. - -More than just a cache. ------------------------ - -The "dcache" caches information about names in each filesystem to -make them quickly available for lookup. Each entry (known as a -"dentry") contains three significant fields: a component name, a -pointer to a parent dentry, and a pointer to the "inode" which -contains further information about the object in that parent with -the given name. The inode pointer can be `NULL` indicating that the -name doesn't exist in the parent. While there can be linkage in the -dentry of a directory to the dentries of the children, that linkage is -not used for pathname lookup, and so will not be considered here. - -The dcache has a number of uses apart from accelerating lookup. One -that will be particularly relevant is that it is closely integrated -with the mount table that records which filesystem is mounted where. -What the mount table actually stores is which dentry is mounted on top -of which other dentry. - -When considering the dcache, we have another of our "two types" -distinctions: there are two types of filesystems. - -Some filesystems ensure that the information in the dcache is always -completely accurate (though not necessarily complete). This can allow -the VFS to determine if a particular file does or doesn't exist -without checking with the filesystem, and means that the VFS can -protect the filesystem against certain races and other problems. -These are typically "local" filesystems such as ext3, XFS, and Btrfs. - -Other filesystems don't provide that guarantee because they cannot. -These are typically filesystems that are shared across a network, -whether remote filesystems like NFS and 9P, or cluster filesystems -like ocfs2 or cephfs. These filesystems allow the VFS to revalidate -cached information, and must provide their own protection against -awkward races. The VFS can detect these filesystems by the -`DCACHE_OP_REVALIDATE` flag being set in the dentry. - -REF-walk: simple concurrency management with refcounts and spinlocks --------------------------------------------------------------------- - -With all of those divisions carefully classified, we can now start -looking at the actual process of walking along a path. In particular -we will start with the handling of the "everything else" part of a -pathname, and focus on the "REF-walk" approach to concurrency -management. This code is found in the `link_path_walk()` function, if -you ignore all the places that only run when "`LOOKUP_RCU`" -(indicating the use of RCU-walk) is set. - -[Meet the Lockers]: https://lwn.net/Articles/453685/ - -REF-walk is fairly heavy-handed with locks and reference counts. Not -as heavy-handed as in the old "big kernel lock" days, but certainly not -afraid of taking a lock when one is needed. It uses a variety of -different concurrency controls. A background understanding of the -various primitives is assumed, or can be gleaned from elsewhere such -as in [Meet the Lockers]. - -The locking mechanisms used by REF-walk include: - -### dentry->d_lockref ### - -This uses the lockref primitive to provide both a spinlock and a -reference count. The special-sauce of this primitive is that the -conceptual sequence "lock; inc_ref; unlock;" can often be performed -with a single atomic memory operation. - -Holding a reference on a dentry ensures that the dentry won't suddenly -be freed and used for something else, so the values in various fields -will behave as expected. It also protects the `->d_inode` reference -to the inode to some extent. - -The association between a dentry and its inode is fairly permanent. -For example, when a file is renamed, the dentry and inode move -together to the new location. When a file is created the dentry will -initially be negative (i.e. `d_inode` is `NULL`), and will be assigned -to the new inode as part of the act of creation. - -When a file is deleted, this can be reflected in the cache either by -setting `d_inode` to `NULL`, or by removing it from the hash table -(described shortly) used to look up the name in the parent directory. -If the dentry is still in use the second option is used as it is -perfectly legal to keep using an open file after it has been deleted -and having the dentry around helps. If the dentry is not otherwise in -use (i.e. if the refcount in `d_lockref` is one), only then will -`d_inode` be set to `NULL`. Doing it this way is more efficient for a -very common case. - -So as long as a counted reference is held to a dentry, a non-`NULL` `->d_inode` -value will never be changed. - -### dentry->d_lock ### - -`d_lock` is a synonym for the spinlock that is part of `d_lockref` above. -For our purposes, holding this lock protects against the dentry being -renamed or unlinked. In particular, its parent (`d_parent`), and its -name (`d_name`) cannot be changed, and it cannot be removed from the -dentry hash table. - -When looking for a name in a directory, REF-walk takes `d_lock` on -each candidate dentry that it finds in the hash table and then checks -that the parent and name are correct. So it doesn't lock the parent -while searching in the cache; it only locks children. - -When looking for the parent for a given name (to handle "`..`"), -REF-walk can take `d_lock` to get a stable reference to `d_parent`, -but it first tries a more lightweight approach. As seen in -`dget_parent()`, if a reference can be claimed on the parent, and if -subsequently `d_parent` can be seen to have not changed, then there is -no need to actually take the lock on the child. - -### rename_lock ### - -Looking up a given name in a given directory involves computing a hash -from the two values (the name and the dentry of the directory), -accessing that slot in a hash table, and searching the linked list -that is found there. - -When a dentry is renamed, the name and the parent dentry can both -change so the hash will almost certainly change too. This would move the -dentry to a different chain in the hash table. If a filename search -happened to be looking at a dentry that was moved in this way, -it might end up continuing the search down the wrong chain, -and so miss out on part of the correct chain. - -The name-lookup process (`d_lookup()`) does _not_ try to prevent this -from happening, but only to detect when it happens. -`rename_lock` is a seqlock that is updated whenever any dentry is -renamed. If `d_lookup` finds that a rename happened while it -unsuccessfully scanned a chain in the hash table, it simply tries -again. - -### inode->i_mutex ### - -`i_mutex` is a mutex that serializes all changes to a particular -directory. This ensures that, for example, an `unlink()` and a `rename()` -cannot both happen at the same time. It also keeps the directory -stable while the filesystem is asked to look up a name that is not -currently in the dcache. - -This has a complementary role to that of `d_lock`: `i_mutex` on a -directory protects all of the names in that directory, while `d_lock` -on a name protects just one name in a directory. Most changes to the -dcache hold `i_mutex` on the relevant directory inode and briefly take -`d_lock` on one or more the dentries while the change happens. One -exception is when idle dentries are removed from the dcache due to -memory pressure. This uses `d_lock`, but `i_mutex` plays no role. - -The mutex affects pathname lookup in two distinct ways. Firstly it -serializes lookup of a name in a directory. `walk_component()` uses -`lookup_fast()` first which, in turn, checks to see if the name is in the cache, -using only `d_lock` locking. If the name isn't found, then `walk_component()` -falls back to `lookup_slow()` which takes `i_mutex`, checks again that -the name isn't in the cache, and then calls in to the filesystem to get a -definitive answer. A new dentry will be added to the cache regardless of -the result. - -Secondly, when pathname lookup reaches the final component, it will -sometimes need to take `i_mutex` before performing the last lookup so -that the required exclusion can be achieved. How path lookup chooses -to take, or not take, `i_mutex` is one of the -issues addressed in a subsequent section. - -### mnt->mnt_count ### - -`mnt_count` is a per-CPU reference counter on "`mount`" structures. -Per-CPU here means that incrementing the count is cheap as it only -uses CPU-local memory, but checking if the count is zero is expensive as -it needs to check with every CPU. Taking a `mnt_count` reference -prevents the mount structure from disappearing as the result of regular -unmount operations, but does not prevent a "lazy" unmount. So holding -`mnt_count` doesn't ensure that the mount remains in the namespace and, -in particular, doesn't stabilize the link to the mounted-on dentry. It -does, however, ensure that the `mount` data structure remains coherent, -and it provides a reference to the root dentry of the mounted -filesystem. So a reference through `->mnt_count` provides a stable -reference to the mounted dentry, but not the mounted-on dentry. - -### mount_lock ### - -`mount_lock` is a global seqlock, a bit like `rename_lock`. It can be used to -check if any change has been made to any mount points. - -While walking down the tree (away from the root) this lock is used when -crossing a mount point to check that the crossing was safe. That is, -the value in the seqlock is read, then the code finds the mount that -is mounted on the current directory, if there is one, and increments -the `mnt_count`. Finally the value in `mount_lock` is checked against -the old value. If there is no change, then the crossing was safe. If there -was a change, the `mnt_count` is decremented and the whole process is -retried. - -When walking up the tree (towards the root) by following a ".." link, -a little more care is needed. In this case the seqlock (which -contains both a counter and a spinlock) is fully locked to prevent -any changes to any mount points while stepping up. This locking is -needed to stabilize the link to the mounted-on dentry, which the -refcount on the mount itself doesn't ensure. - -### RCU ### - -Finally the global (but extremely lightweight) RCU read lock is held -from time to time to ensure certain data structures don't get freed -unexpectedly. - -In particular it is held while scanning chains in the dcache hash -table, and the mount point hash table. - -Bringing it together with `struct nameidata` --------------------------------------------- - -[First edition Unix]: http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=V1/u2.s - -Throughout the process of walking a path, the current status is stored -in a `struct nameidata`, "namei" being the traditional name - dating -all the way back to [First Edition Unix] - of the function that -converts a "name" to an "inode". `struct nameidata` contains (among -other fields): - -### `struct path path` ### - -A `path` contains a `struct vfsmount` (which is -embedded in a `struct mount`) and a `struct dentry`. Together these -record the current status of the walk. They start out referring to the -starting point (the current working directory, the root directory, or some other -directory identified by a file descriptor), and are updated on each -step. A reference through `d_lockref` and `mnt_count` is always -held. - -### `struct qstr last` ### - -This is a string together with a length (i.e. _not_ `nul` terminated) -that is the "next" component in the pathname. - -### `int last_type` ### - -This is one of `LAST_NORM`, `LAST_ROOT`, `LAST_DOT`, `LAST_DOTDOT`, or -`LAST_BIND`. The `last` field is only valid if the type is -`LAST_NORM`. `LAST_BIND` is used when following a symlink and no -components of the symlink have been processed yet. Others should be -fairly self-explanatory. - -### `struct path root` ### - -This is used to hold a reference to the effective root of the -filesystem. Often that reference won't be needed, so this field is -only assigned the first time it is used, or when a non-standard root -is requested. Keeping a reference in the `nameidata` ensures that -only one root is in effect for the entire path walk, even if it races -with a `chroot()` system call. - -The root is needed when either of two conditions holds: (1) either the -pathname or a symbolic link starts with a "'/'", or (2) a "`..`" -component is being handled, since "`..`" from the root must always stay -at the root. The value used is usually the current root directory of -the calling process. An alternate root can be provided as when -`sysctl()` calls `file_open_root()`, and when NFSv4 or Btrfs call -`mount_subtree()`. In each case a pathname is being looked up in a very -specific part of the filesystem, and the lookup must not be allowed to -escape that subtree. It works a bit like a local `chroot()`. - -Ignoring the handling of symbolic links, we can now describe the -"`link_path_walk()`" function, which handles the lookup of everything -except the final component as: - -> Given a path (`name`) and a nameidata structure (`nd`), check that the -> current directory has execute permission and then advance `name` -> over one component while updating `last_type` and `last`. If that -> was the final component, then return, otherwise call -> `walk_component()` and repeat from the top. - -`walk_component()` is even easier. If the component is `LAST_DOTS`, -it calls `handle_dots()` which does the necessary locking as already -described. If it finds a `LAST_NORM` component it first calls -"`lookup_fast()`" which only looks in the dcache, but will ask the -filesystem to revalidate the result if it is that sort of filesystem. -If that doesn't get a good result, it calls "`lookup_slow()`" which -takes the `i_mutex`, rechecks the cache, and then asks the filesystem -to find a definitive answer. Each of these will call -`follow_managed()` (as described below) to handle any mount points. - -In the absence of symbolic links, `walk_component()` creates a new -`struct path` containing a counted reference to the new dentry and a -reference to the new `vfsmount` which is only counted if it is -different from the previous `vfsmount`. It then calls -`path_to_nameidata()` to install the new `struct path` in the -`struct nameidata` and drop the unneeded references. - -This "hand-over-hand" sequencing of getting a reference to the new -dentry before dropping the reference to the previous dentry may -seem obvious, but is worth pointing out so that we will recognize its -analogue in the "RCU-walk" version. - -Handling the final component. ------------------------------ - -`link_path_walk()` only walks as far as setting `nd->last` and -`nd->last_type` to refer to the final component of the path. It does -not call `walk_component()` that last time. Handling that final -component remains for the caller to sort out. Those callers are -`path_lookupat()`, `path_parentat()`, `path_mountpoint()` and -`path_openat()` each of which handles the differing requirements of -different system calls. - -`path_parentat()` is clearly the simplest - it just wraps a little bit -of housekeeping around `link_path_walk()` and returns the parent -directory and final component to the caller. The caller will be either -aiming to create a name (via `filename_create()`) or remove or rename -a name (in which case `user_path_parent()` is used). They will use -`i_mutex` to exclude other changes while they validate and then -perform their operation. - -`path_lookupat()` is nearly as simple - it is used when an existing -object is wanted such as by `stat()` or `chmod()`. It essentially just -calls `walk_component()` on the final component through a call to -`lookup_last()`. `path_lookupat()` returns just the final dentry. - -`path_mountpoint()` handles the special case of unmounting which must -not try to revalidate the mounted filesystem. It effectively -contains, through a call to `mountpoint_last()`, an alternate -implementation of `lookup_slow()` which skips that step. This is -important when unmounting a filesystem that is inaccessible, such as -one provided by a dead NFS server. - -Finally `path_openat()` is used for the `open()` system call; it -contains, in support functions starting with "`do_last()`", all the -complexity needed to handle the different subtleties of O_CREAT (with -or without O_EXCL), final "`/`" characters, and trailing symbolic -links. We will revisit this in the final part of this series, which -focuses on those symbolic links. "`do_last()`" will sometimes, but -not always, take `i_mutex`, depending on what it finds. - -Each of these, or the functions which call them, need to be alert to -the possibility that the final component is not `LAST_NORM`. If the -goal of the lookup is to create something, then any value for -`last_type` other than `LAST_NORM` will result in an error. For -example if `path_parentat()` reports `LAST_DOTDOT`, then the caller -won't try to create that name. They also check for trailing slashes -by testing `last.name[last.len]`. If there is any character beyond -the final component, it must be a trailing slash. - -Revalidation and automounts ---------------------------- - -Apart from symbolic links, there are only two parts of the "REF-walk" -process not yet covered. One is the handling of stale cache entries -and the other is automounts. - -On filesystems that require it, the lookup routines will call the -`->d_revalidate()` dentry method to ensure that the cached information -is current. This will often confirm validity or update a few details -from a server. In some cases it may find that there has been change -further up the path and that something that was thought to be valid -previously isn't really. When this happens the lookup of the whole -path is aborted and retried with the "`LOOKUP_REVAL`" flag set. This -forces revalidation to be more thorough. We will see more details of -this retry process in the next article. - -Automount points are locations in the filesystem where an attempt to -lookup a name can trigger changes to how that lookup should be -handled, in particular by mounting a filesystem there. These are -covered in greater detail in autofs.txt in the Linux documentation -tree, but a few notes specifically related to path lookup are in order -here. - -The Linux VFS has a concept of "managed" dentries which is reflected -in function names such as "`follow_managed()`". There are three -potentially interesting things about these dentries corresponding -to three different flags that might be set in `dentry->d_flags`: - -### `DCACHE_MANAGE_TRANSIT` ### - -If this flag has been set, then the filesystem has requested that the -`d_manage()` dentry operation be called before handling any possible -mount point. This can perform two particular services: - -It can block to avoid races. If an automount point is being -unmounted, the `d_manage()` function will usually wait for that -process to complete before letting the new lookup proceed and possibly -trigger a new automount. - -It can selectively allow only some processes to transit through a -mount point. When a server process is managing automounts, it may -need to access a directory without triggering normal automount -processing. That server process can identify itself to the `autofs` -filesystem, which will then give it a special pass through -`d_manage()` by returning `-EISDIR`. - -### `DCACHE_MOUNTED` ### - -This flag is set on every dentry that is mounted on. As Linux -supports multiple filesystem namespaces, it is possible that the -dentry may not be mounted on in *this* namespace, just in some -other. So this flag is seen as a hint, not a promise. - -If this flag is set, and `d_manage()` didn't return `-EISDIR`, -`lookup_mnt()` is called to examine the mount hash table (honoring the -`mount_lock` described earlier) and possibly return a new `vfsmount` -and a new `dentry` (both with counted references). - -### `DCACHE_NEED_AUTOMOUNT` ### - -If `d_manage()` allowed us to get this far, and `lookup_mnt()` didn't -find a mount point, then this flag causes the `d_automount()` dentry -operation to be called. - -The `d_automount()` operation can be arbitrarily complex and may -communicate with server processes etc. but it should ultimately either -report that there was an error, that there was nothing to mount, or -should provide an updated `struct path` with new `dentry` and `vfsmount`. - -In the latter case, `finish_automount()` will be called to safely -install the new mount point into the mount table. - -There is no new locking of import here and it is important that no -locks (only counted references) are held over this processing due to -the very real possibility of extended delays. -This will become more important next time when we examine RCU-walk -which is particularly sensitive to delays. - -RCU-walk - faster pathname lookup in Linux -========================================== - -RCU-walk is another algorithm for performing pathname lookup in Linux. -It is in many ways similar to REF-walk and the two share quite a bit -of code. The significant difference in RCU-walk is how it allows for -the possibility of concurrent access. - -We noted that REF-walk is complex because there are numerous details -and special cases. RCU-walk reduces this complexity by simply -refusing to handle a number of cases -- it instead falls back to -REF-walk. The difficulty with RCU-walk comes from a different -direction: unfamiliarity. The locking rules when depending on RCU are -quite different from traditional locking, so we will spend a little extra -time when we come to those. - -Clear demarcation of roles --------------------------- - -The easiest way to manage concurrency is to forcibly stop any other -thread from changing the data structures that a given thread is -looking at. In cases where no other thread would even think of -changing the data and lots of different threads want to read at the -same time, this can be very costly. Even when using locks that permit -multiple concurrent readers, the simple act of updating the count of -the number of current readers can impose an unwanted cost. So the -goal when reading a shared data structure that no other process is -changing is to avoid writing anything to memory at all. Take no -locks, increment no counts, leave no footprints. - -The REF-walk mechanism already described certainly doesn't follow this -principle, but then it is really designed to work when there may well -be other threads modifying the data. RCU-walk, in contrast, is -designed for the common situation where there are lots of frequent -readers and only occasional writers. This may not be common in all -parts of the filesystem tree, but in many parts it will be. For the -other parts it is important that RCU-walk can quickly fall back to -using REF-walk. - -Pathname lookup always starts in RCU-walk mode but only remains there -as long as what it is looking for is in the cache and is stable. It -dances lightly down the cached filesystem image, leaving no footprints -and carefully watching where it is, to be sure it doesn't trip. If it -notices that something has changed or is changing, or if something -isn't in the cache, then it tries to stop gracefully and switch to -REF-walk. - -This stopping requires getting a counted reference on the current -`vfsmount` and `dentry`, and ensuring that these are still valid - -that a path walk with REF-walk would have found the same entries. -This is an invariant that RCU-walk must guarantee. It can only make -decisions, such as selecting the next step, that are decisions which -REF-walk could also have made if it were walking down the tree at the -same time. If the graceful stop succeeds, the rest of the path is -processed with the reliable, if slightly sluggish, REF-walk. If -RCU-walk finds it cannot stop gracefully, it simply gives up and -restarts from the top with REF-walk. - -This pattern of "try RCU-walk, if that fails try REF-walk" can be -clearly seen in functions like `filename_lookup()`, -`filename_parentat()`, `filename_mountpoint()`, -`do_filp_open()`, and `do_file_open_root()`. These five -correspond roughly to the four `path_`* functions we met earlier, -each of which calls `link_path_walk()`. The `path_*` functions are -called using different mode flags until a mode is found which works. -They are first called with `LOOKUP_RCU` set to request "RCU-walk". If -that fails with the error `ECHILD` they are called again with no -special flag to request "REF-walk". If either of those report the -error `ESTALE` a final attempt is made with `LOOKUP_REVAL` set (and no -`LOOKUP_RCU`) to ensure that entries found in the cache are forcibly -revalidated - normally entries are only revalidated if the filesystem -determines that they are too old to trust. - -The `LOOKUP_RCU` attempt may drop that flag internally and switch to -REF-walk, but will never then try to switch back to RCU-walk. Places -that trip up RCU-walk are much more likely to be near the leaves and -so it is very unlikely that there will be much, if any, benefit from -switching back. - -RCU and seqlocks: fast and light --------------------------------- - -RCU is, unsurprisingly, critical to RCU-walk mode. The -`rcu_read_lock()` is held for the entire time that RCU-walk is walking -down a path. The particular guarantee it provides is that the key -data structures - dentries, inodes, super_blocks, and mounts - will -not be freed while the lock is held. They might be unlinked or -invalidated in one way or another, but the memory will not be -repurposed so values in various fields will still be meaningful. This -is the only guarantee that RCU provides; everything else is done using -seqlocks. - -As we saw above, REF-walk holds a counted reference to the current -dentry and the current vfsmount, and does not release those references -before taking references to the "next" dentry or vfsmount. It also -sometimes takes the `d_lock` spinlock. These references and locks are -taken to prevent certain changes from happening. RCU-walk must not -take those references or locks and so cannot prevent such changes. -Instead, it checks to see if a change has been made, and aborts or -retries if it has. - -To preserve the invariant mentioned above (that RCU-walk may only make -decisions that REF-walk could have made), it must make the checks at -or near the same places that REF-walk holds the references. So, when -REF-walk increments a reference count or takes a spinlock, RCU-walk -samples the status of a seqlock using `read_seqcount_begin()` or a -similar function. When REF-walk decrements the count or drops the -lock, RCU-walk checks if the sampled status is still valid using -`read_seqcount_retry()` or similar. - -However, there is a little bit more to seqlocks than that. If -RCU-walk accesses two different fields in a seqlock-protected -structure, or accesses the same field twice, there is no a priori -guarantee of any consistency between those accesses. When consistency -is needed - which it usually is - RCU-walk must take a copy and then -use `read_seqcount_retry()` to validate that copy. - -`read_seqcount_retry()` not only checks the sequence number, but also -imposes a memory barrier so that no memory-read instruction from -*before* the call can be delayed until *after* the call, either by the -CPU or by the compiler. A simple example of this can be seen in -`slow_dentry_cmp()` which, for filesystems which do not use simple -byte-wise name equality, calls into the filesystem to compare a name -against a dentry. The length and name pointer are copied into local -variables, then `read_seqcount_retry()` is called to confirm the two -are consistent, and only then is `->d_compare()` called. When -standard filename comparison is used, `dentry_cmp()` is called -instead. Notably it does _not_ use `read_seqcount_retry()`, but -instead has a large comment explaining why the consistency guarantee -isn't necessary. A subsequent `read_seqcount_retry()` will be -sufficient to catch any problem that could occur at this point. - -With that little refresher on seqlocks out of the way we can look at -the bigger picture of how RCU-walk uses seqlocks. - -### `mount_lock` and `nd->m_seq` ### - -We already met the `mount_lock` seqlock when REF-walk used it to -ensure that crossing a mount point is performed safely. RCU-walk uses -it for that too, but for quite a bit more. - -Instead of taking a counted reference to each `vfsmount` as it -descends the tree, RCU-walk samples the state of `mount_lock` at the -start of the walk and stores this initial sequence number in the -`struct nameidata` in the `m_seq` field. This one lock and one -sequence number are used to validate all accesses to all `vfsmounts`, -and all mount point crossings. As changes to the mount table are -relatively rare, it is reasonable to fall back on REF-walk any time -that any "mount" or "unmount" happens. - -`m_seq` is checked (using `read_seqretry()`) at the end of an RCU-walk -sequence, whether switching to REF-walk for the rest of the path or -when the end of the path is reached. It is also checked when stepping -down over a mount point (in `__follow_mount_rcu()`) or up (in -`follow_dotdot_rcu()`). If it is ever found to have changed, the -whole RCU-walk sequence is aborted and the path is processed again by -REF-walk. - -If RCU-walk finds that `mount_lock` hasn't changed then it can be sure -that, had REF-walk taken counted references on each vfsmount, the -results would have been the same. This ensures the invariant holds, -at least for vfsmount structures. - -### `dentry->d_seq` and `nd->seq`. ### - -In place of taking a count or lock on `d_reflock`, RCU-walk samples -the per-dentry `d_seq` seqlock, and stores the sequence number in the -`seq` field of the nameidata structure, so `nd->seq` should always be -the current sequence number of `nd->dentry`. This number needs to be -revalidated after copying, and before using, the name, parent, or -inode of the dentry. - -The handling of the name we have already looked at, and the parent is -only accessed in `follow_dotdot_rcu()` which fairly trivially follows -the required pattern, though it does so for three different cases. - -When not at a mount point, `d_parent` is followed and its `d_seq` is -collected. When we are at a mount point, we instead follow the -`mnt->mnt_mountpoint` link to get a new dentry and collect its -`d_seq`. Then, after finally finding a `d_parent` to follow, we must -check if we have landed on a mount point and, if so, must find that -mount point and follow the `mnt->mnt_root` link. This would imply a -somewhat unusual, but certainly possible, circumstance where the -starting point of the path lookup was in part of the filesystem that -was mounted on, and so not visible from the root. - -The inode pointer, stored in `->d_inode`, is a little more -interesting. The inode will always need to be accessed at least -twice, once to determine if it is NULL and once to verify access -permissions. Symlink handling requires a validated inode pointer too. -Rather than revalidating on each access, a copy is made on the first -access and it is stored in the `inode` field of `nameidata` from where -it can be safely accessed without further validation. - -`lookup_fast()` is the only lookup routine that is used in RCU-mode, -`lookup_slow()` being too slow and requiring locks. It is in -`lookup_fast()` that we find the important "hand over hand" tracking -of the current dentry. - -The current `dentry` and current `seq` number are passed to -`__d_lookup_rcu()` which, on success, returns a new `dentry` and a -new `seq` number. `lookup_fast()` then copies the inode pointer and -revalidates the new `seq` number. It then validates the old `dentry` -with the old `seq` number one last time and only then continues. This -process of getting the `seq` number of the new dentry and then -checking the `seq` number of the old exactly mirrors the process of -getting a counted reference to the new dentry before dropping that for -the old dentry which we saw in REF-walk. - -### No `inode->i_mutex` or even `rename_lock` ### - -A mutex is a fairly heavyweight lock that can only be taken when it is -permissible to sleep. As `rcu_read_lock()` forbids sleeping, -`inode->i_mutex` plays no role in RCU-walk. If some other thread does -take `i_mutex` and modifies the directory in a way that RCU-walk needs -to notice, the result will be either that RCU-walk fails to find the -dentry that it is looking for, or it will find a dentry which -`read_seqretry()` won't validate. In either case it will drop down to -REF-walk mode which can take whatever locks are needed. - -Though `rename_lock` could be used by RCU-walk as it doesn't require -any sleeping, RCU-walk doesn't bother. REF-walk uses `rename_lock` to -protect against the possibility of hash chains in the dcache changing -while they are being searched. This can result in failing to find -something that actually is there. When RCU-walk fails to find -something in the dentry cache, whether it is really there or not, it -already drops down to REF-walk and tries again with appropriate -locking. This neatly handles all cases, so adding extra checks on -rename_lock would bring no significant value. - -`unlazy walk()` and `complete_walk()` -------------------------------------- - -That "dropping down to REF-walk" typically involves a call to -`unlazy_walk()`, so named because "RCU-walk" is also sometimes -referred to as "lazy walk". `unlazy_walk()` is called when -following the path down to the current vfsmount/dentry pair seems to -have proceeded successfully, but the next step is problematic. This -can happen if the next name cannot be found in the dcache, if -permission checking or name revalidation couldn't be achieved while -the `rcu_read_lock()` is held (which forbids sleeping), if an -automount point is found, or in a couple of cases involving symlinks. -It is also called from `complete_walk()` when the lookup has reached -the final component, or the very end of the path, depending on which -particular flavor of lookup is used. - -Other reasons for dropping out of RCU-walk that do not trigger a call -to `unlazy_walk()` are when some inconsistency is found that cannot be -handled immediately, such as `mount_lock` or one of the `d_seq` -seqlocks reporting a change. In these cases the relevant function -will return `-ECHILD` which will percolate up until it triggers a new -attempt from the top using REF-walk. - -For those cases where `unlazy_walk()` is an option, it essentially -takes a reference on each of the pointers that it holds (vfsmount, -dentry, and possibly some symbolic links) and then verifies that the -relevant seqlocks have not been changed. If there have been changes, -it, too, aborts with `-ECHILD`, otherwise the transition to REF-walk -has been a success and the lookup process continues. - -Taking a reference on those pointers is not quite as simple as just -incrementing a counter. That works to take a second reference if you -already have one (often indirectly through another object), but it -isn't sufficient if you don't actually have a counted reference at -all. For `dentry->d_lockref`, it is safe to increment the reference -counter to get a reference unless it has been explicitly marked as -"dead" which involves setting the counter to `-128`. -`lockref_get_not_dead()` achieves this. - -For `mnt->mnt_count` it is safe to take a reference as long as -`mount_lock` is then used to validate the reference. If that -validation fails, it may *not* be safe to just drop that reference in -the standard way of calling `mnt_put()` - an unmount may have -progressed too far. So the code in `legitimize_mnt()`, when it -finds that the reference it got might not be safe, checks the -`MNT_SYNC_UMOUNT` flag to determine if a simple `mnt_put()` is -correct, or if it should just decrement the count and pretend none of -this ever happened. - -Taking care in filesystems ---------------------------- - -RCU-walk depends almost entirely on cached information and often will -not call into the filesystem at all. However there are two places, -besides the already-mentioned component-name comparison, where the -file system might be included in RCU-walk, and it must know to be -careful. - -If the filesystem has non-standard permission-checking requirements - -such as a networked filesystem which may need to check with the server -- the `i_op->permission` interface might be called during RCU-walk. -In this case an extra "`MAY_NOT_BLOCK`" flag is passed so that it -knows not to sleep, but to return `-ECHILD` if it cannot complete -promptly. `i_op->permission` is given the inode pointer, not the -dentry, so it doesn't need to worry about further consistency checks. -However if it accesses any other filesystem data structures, it must -ensure they are safe to be accessed with only the `rcu_read_lock()` -held. This typically means they must be freed using `kfree_rcu()` or -similar. - -[`READ_ONCE()`]: https://lwn.net/Articles/624126/ - -If the filesystem may need to revalidate dcache entries, then -`d_op->d_revalidate` may be called in RCU-walk too. This interface -*is* passed the dentry but does not have access to the `inode` or the -`seq` number from the `nameidata`, so it needs to be extra careful -when accessing fields in the dentry. This "extra care" typically -involves using [`READ_ONCE()`] to access fields, and verifying the -result is not NULL before using it. This pattern can be seen in -`nfs_lookup_revalidate()`. - -A pair of patterns ------------------- - -In various places in the details of REF-walk and RCU-walk, and also in -the big picture, there are a couple of related patterns that are worth -being aware of. - -The first is "try quickly and check, if that fails try slowly". We -can see that in the high-level approach of first trying RCU-walk and -then trying REF-walk, and in places where `unlazy_walk()` is used to -switch to REF-walk for the rest of the path. We also saw it earlier -in `dget_parent()` when following a "`..`" link. It tries a quick way -to get a reference, then falls back to taking locks if needed. - -The second pattern is "try quickly and check, if that fails try -again - repeatedly". This is seen with the use of `rename_lock` and -`mount_lock` in REF-walk. RCU-walk doesn't make use of this pattern - -if anything goes wrong it is much safer to just abort and try a more -sedate approach. - -The emphasis here is "try quickly and check". It should probably be -"try quickly _and carefully,_ then check". The fact that checking is -needed is a reminder that the system is dynamic and only a limited -number of things are safe at all. The most likely cause of errors in -this whole process is assuming something is safe when in reality it -isn't. Careful consideration of what exactly guarantees the safety of -each access is sometimes necessary. - -A walk among the symlinks -========================= - -There are several basic issues that we will examine to understand the -handling of symbolic links: the symlink stack, together with cache -lifetimes, will help us understand the overall recursive handling of -symlinks and lead to the special care needed for the final component. -Then a consideration of access-time updates and summary of the various -flags controlling lookup will finish the story. - -The symlink stack ------------------ - -There are only two sorts of filesystem objects that can usefully -appear in a path prior to the final component: directories and symlinks. -Handling directories is quite straightforward: the new directory -simply becomes the starting point at which to interpret the next -component on the path. Handling symbolic links requires a bit more -work. - -Conceptually, symbolic links could be handled by editing the path. If -a component name refers to a symbolic link, then that component is -replaced by the body of the link and, if that body starts with a '/', -then all preceding parts of the path are discarded. This is what the -"`readlink -f`" command does, though it also edits out "`.`" and -"`..`" components. - -Directly editing the path string is not really necessary when looking -up a path, and discarding early components is pointless as they aren't -looked at anyway. Keeping track of all remaining components is -important, but they can of course be kept separately; there is no need -to concatenate them. As one symlink may easily refer to another, -which in turn can refer to a third, we may need to keep the remaining -components of several paths, each to be processed when the preceding -ones are completed. These path remnants are kept on a stack of -limited size. - -There are two reasons for placing limits on how many symlinks can -occur in a single path lookup. The most obvious is to avoid loops. -If a symlink referred to itself either directly or through -intermediaries, then following the symlink can never complete -successfully - the error `ELOOP` must be returned. Loops can be -detected without imposing limits, but limits are the simplest solution -and, given the second reason for restriction, quite sufficient. - -[outlined recently]: http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.linux.kernel/1934390/focus=1934550 - -The second reason was [outlined recently] by Linus: - -> Because it's a latency and DoS issue too. We need to react well to -> true loops, but also to "very deep" non-loops. It's not about memory -> use, it's about users triggering unreasonable CPU resources. - -Linux imposes a limit on the length of any pathname: `PATH_MAX`, which -is 4096. There are a number of reasons for this limit; not letting the -kernel spend too much time on just one path is one of them. With -symbolic links you can effectively generate much longer paths so some -sort of limit is needed for the same reason. Linux imposes a limit of -at most 40 symlinks in any one path lookup. It previously imposed a -further limit of eight on the maximum depth of recursion, but that was -raised to 40 when a separate stack was implemented, so there is now -just the one limit. - -The `nameidata` structure that we met in an earlier article contains a -small stack that can be used to store the remaining part of up to two -symlinks. In many cases this will be sufficient. If it isn't, a -separate stack is allocated with room for 40 symlinks. Pathname -lookup will never exceed that stack as, once the 40th symlink is -detected, an error is returned. - -It might seem that the name remnants are all that needs to be stored on -this stack, but we need a bit more. To see that, we need to move on to -cache lifetimes. - -Storage and lifetime of cached symlinks ---------------------------------------- - -Like other filesystem resources, such as inodes and directory -entries, symlinks are cached by Linux to avoid repeated costly access -to external storage. It is particularly important for RCU-walk to be -able to find and temporarily hold onto these cached entries, so that -it doesn't need to drop down into REF-walk. - -[object-oriented design pattern]: https://lwn.net/Articles/446317/ - -While each filesystem is free to make its own choice, symlinks are -typically stored in one of two places. Short symlinks are often -stored directly in the inode. When a filesystem allocates a `struct -inode` it typically allocates extra space to store private data (a -common [object-oriented design pattern] in the kernel). This will -sometimes include space for a symlink. The other common location is -in the page cache, which normally stores the content of files. The -pathname in a symlink can be seen as the content of that symlink and -can easily be stored in the page cache just like file content. - -When neither of these is suitable, the next most likely scenario is -that the filesystem will allocate some temporary memory and copy or -construct the symlink content into that memory whenever it is needed. - -When the symlink is stored in the inode, it has the same lifetime as -the inode which, itself, is protected by RCU or by a counted reference -on the dentry. This means that the mechanisms that pathname lookup -uses to access the dcache and icache (inode cache) safely are quite -sufficient for accessing some cached symlinks safely. In these cases, -the `i_link` pointer in the inode is set to point to wherever the -symlink is stored and it can be accessed directly whenever needed. - -When the symlink is stored in the page cache or elsewhere, the -situation is not so straightforward. A reference on a dentry or even -on an inode does not imply any reference on cached pages of that -inode, and even an `rcu_read_lock()` is not sufficient to ensure that -a page will not disappear. So for these symlinks the pathname lookup -code needs to ask the filesystem to provide a stable reference and, -significantly, needs to release that reference when it is finished -with it. - -Taking a reference to a cache page is often possible even in RCU-walk -mode. It does require making changes to memory, which is best avoided, -but that isn't necessarily a big cost and it is better than dropping -out of RCU-walk mode completely. Even filesystems that allocate -space to copy the symlink into can use `GFP_ATOMIC` to often successfully -allocate memory without the need to drop out of RCU-walk. If a -filesystem cannot successfully get a reference in RCU-walk mode, it -must return `-ECHILD` and `unlazy_walk()` will be called to return to -REF-walk mode in which the filesystem is allowed to sleep. - -The place for all this to happen is the `i_op->follow_link()` inode -method. In the present mainline code this is never actually called in -RCU-walk mode as the rewrite is not quite complete. It is likely that -in a future release this method will be passed an `inode` pointer when -called in RCU-walk mode so it both (1) knows to be careful, and (2) has the -validated pointer. Much like the `i_op->permission()` method we -looked at previously, `->follow_link()` would need to be careful that -all the data structures it references are safe to be accessed while -holding no counted reference, only the RCU lock. Though getting a -reference with `->follow_link()` is not yet done in RCU-walk mode, the -code is ready to release the reference when that does happen. - -This need to drop the reference to a symlink adds significant -complexity. It requires a reference to the inode so that the -`i_op->put_link()` inode operation can be called. In REF-walk, that -reference is kept implicitly through a reference to the dentry, so -keeping the `struct path` of the symlink is easiest. For RCU-walk, -the pointer to the inode is kept separately. To allow switching from -RCU-walk back to REF-walk in the middle of processing nested symlinks -we also need the seq number for the dentry so we can confirm that -switching back was safe. - -Finally, when providing a reference to a symlink, the filesystem also -provides an opaque "cookie" that must be passed to `->put_link()` so that it -knows what to free. This might be the allocated memory area, or a -pointer to the `struct page` in the page cache, or something else -completely. Only the filesystem knows what it is. - -In order for the reference to each symlink to be dropped when the walk completes, -whether in RCU-walk or REF-walk, the symlink stack needs to contain, -along with the path remnants: - -- the `struct path` to provide a reference to the inode in REF-walk -- the `struct inode *` to provide a reference to the inode in RCU-walk -- the `seq` to allow the path to be safely switched from RCU-walk to REF-walk -- the `cookie` that tells `->put_path()` what to put. - -This means that each entry in the symlink stack needs to hold five -pointers and an integer instead of just one pointer (the path -remnant). On a 64-bit system, this is about 40 bytes per entry; -with 40 entries it adds up to 1600 bytes total, which is less than -half a page. So it might seem like a lot, but is by no means -excessive. - -Note that, in a given stack frame, the path remnant (`name`) is not -part of the symlink that the other fields refer to. It is the remnant -to be followed once that symlink has been fully parsed. - -Following the symlink ---------------------- - -The main loop in `link_path_walk()` iterates seamlessly over all -components in the path and all of the non-final symlinks. As symlinks -are processed, the `name` pointer is adjusted to point to a new -symlink, or is restored from the stack, so that much of the loop -doesn't need to notice. Getting this `name` variable on and off the -stack is very straightforward; pushing and popping the references is -a little more complex. - -When a symlink is found, `walk_component()` returns the value `1` -(`0` is returned for any other sort of success, and a negative number -is, as usual, an error indicator). This causes `get_link()` to be -called; it then gets the link from the filesystem. Providing that -operation is successful, the old path `name` is placed on the stack, -and the new value is used as the `name` for a while. When the end of -the path is found (i.e. `*name` is `'\0'`) the old `name` is restored -off the stack and path walking continues. - -Pushing and popping the reference pointers (inode, cookie, etc.) is more -complex in part because of the desire to handle tail recursion. When -the last component of a symlink itself points to a symlink, we -want to pop the symlink-just-completed off the stack before pushing -the symlink-just-found to avoid leaving empty path remnants that would -just get in the way. - -It is most convenient to push the new symlink references onto the -stack in `walk_component()` immediately when the symlink is found; -`walk_component()` is also the last piece of code that needs to look at the -old symlink as it walks that last component. So it is quite -convenient for `walk_component()` to release the old symlink and pop -the references just before pushing the reference information for the -new symlink. It is guided in this by two flags; `WALK_GET`, which -gives it permission to follow a symlink if it finds one, and -`WALK_PUT`, which tells it to release the current symlink after it has been -followed. `WALK_PUT` is tested first, leading to a call to -`put_link()`. `WALK_GET` is tested subsequently (by -`should_follow_link()`) leading to a call to `pick_link()` which sets -up the stack frame. - -### Symlinks with no final component ### - -A pair of special-case symlinks deserve a little further explanation. -Both result in a new `struct path` (with mount and dentry) being set -up in the `nameidata`, and result in `get_link()` returning `NULL`. - -The more obvious case is a symlink to "`/`". All symlinks starting -with "`/`" are detected in `get_link()` which resets the `nameidata` -to point to the effective filesystem root. If the symlink only -contains "`/`" then there is nothing more to do, no components at all, -so `NULL` is returned to indicate that the symlink can be released and -the stack frame discarded. - -The other case involves things in `/proc` that look like symlinks but -aren't really. - -> $ ls -l /proc/self/fd/1 -> lrwx------ 1 neilb neilb 64 Jun 13 10:19 /proc/self/fd/1 -> /dev/pts/4 - -Every open file descriptor in any process is represented in `/proc` by -something that looks like a symlink. It is really a reference to the -target file, not just the name of it. When you `readlink` these -objects you get a name that might refer to the same file - unless it -has been unlinked or mounted over. When `walk_component()` follows -one of these, the `->follow_link()` method in "procfs" doesn't return -a string name, but instead calls `nd_jump_link()` which updates the -`nameidata` in place to point to that target. `->follow_link()` then -returns `NULL`. Again there is no final component and `get_link()` -reports this by leaving the `last_type` field of `nameidata` as -`LAST_BIND`. - -Following the symlink in the final component --------------------------------------------- - -All this leads to `link_path_walk()` walking down every component, and -following all symbolic links it finds, until it reaches the final -component. This is just returned in the `last` field of `nameidata`. -For some callers, this is all they need; they want to create that -`last` name if it doesn't exist or give an error if it does. Other -callers will want to follow a symlink if one is found, and possibly -apply special handling to the last component of that symlink, rather -than just the last component of the original file name. These callers -potentially need to call `link_path_walk()` again and again on -successive symlinks until one is found that doesn't point to another -symlink. - -This case is handled by the relevant caller of `link_path_walk()`, such as -`path_lookupat()` using a loop that calls `link_path_walk()`, and then -handles the final component. If the final component is a symlink -that needs to be followed, then `trailing_symlink()` is called to set -things up properly and the loop repeats, calling `link_path_walk()` -again. This could loop as many as 40 times if the last component of -each symlink is another symlink. - -The various functions that examine the final component and possibly -report that it is a symlink are `lookup_last()`, `mountpoint_last()` -and `do_last()`, each of which use the same convention as -`walk_component()` of returning `1` if a symlink was found that needs -to be followed. - -Of these, `do_last()` is the most interesting as it is used for -opening a file. Part of `do_last()` runs with `i_mutex` held and this -part is in a separate function: `lookup_open()`. - -Explaining `do_last()` completely is beyond the scope of this article, -but a few highlights should help those interested in exploring the -code. - -1. Rather than just finding the target file, `do_last()` needs to open - it. If the file was found in the dcache, then `vfs_open()` is used for - this. If not, then `lookup_open()` will either call `atomic_open()` (if - the filesystem provides it) to combine the final lookup with the open, or - will perform the separate `lookup_real()` and `vfs_create()` steps - directly. In the later case the actual "open" of this newly found or - created file will be performed by `vfs_open()`, just as if the name - were found in the dcache. - -2. `vfs_open()` can fail with `-EOPENSTALE` if the cached information - wasn't quite current enough. Rather than restarting the lookup from - the top with `LOOKUP_REVAL` set, `lookup_open()` is called instead, - giving the filesystem a chance to resolve small inconsistencies. - If that doesn't work, only then is the lookup restarted from the top. - -3. An open with O_CREAT **does** follow a symlink in the final component, - unlike other creation system calls (like `mkdir`). So the sequence: - - > ln -s bar /tmp/foo - > echo hello > /tmp/foo - - will create a file called `/tmp/bar`. This is not permitted if - `O_EXCL` is set but otherwise is handled for an O_CREAT open much - like for a non-creating open: `should_follow_link()` returns `1`, and - so does `do_last()` so that `trailing_symlink()` gets called and the - open process continues on the symlink that was found. - -Updating the access time ------------------------- - -We previously said of RCU-walk that it would "take no locks, increment -no counts, leave no footprints." We have since seen that some -"footprints" can be needed when handling symlinks as a counted -reference (or even a memory allocation) may be needed. But these -footprints are best kept to a minimum. - -One other place where walking down a symlink can involve leaving -footprints in a way that doesn't affect directories is in updating access times. -In Unix (and Linux) every filesystem object has a "last accessed -time", or "`atime`". Passing through a directory to access a file -within is not considered to be an access for the purposes of -`atime`; only listing the contents of a directory can update its `atime`. -Symlinks are different it seems. Both reading a symlink (with `readlink()`) -and looking up a symlink on the way to some other destination can -update the atime on that symlink. - -[clearest statement]: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/V1_chap04.html#tag_04_08 - -It is not clear why this is the case; POSIX has little to say on the -subject. The [clearest statement] is that, if a particular implementation -updates a timestamp in a place not specified by POSIX, this must be -documented "except that any changes caused by pathname resolution need -not be documented". This seems to imply that POSIX doesn't really -care about access-time updates during pathname lookup. - -[Linux 1.3.87]: https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/history/history.git/diff/fs/ext2/symlink.c?id=f806c6db77b8eaa6e00dcfb6b567706feae8dbb8 - -An examination of history shows that prior to [Linux 1.3.87], the ext2 -filesystem, at least, didn't update atime when following a link. -Unfortunately we have no record of why that behavior was changed. - -In any case, access time must now be updated and that operation can be -quite complex. Trying to stay in RCU-walk while doing it is best -avoided. Fortunately it is often permitted to skip the `atime` -update. Because `atime` updates cause performance problems in various -areas, Linux supports the `relatime` mount option, which generally -limits the updates of `atime` to once per day on files that aren't -being changed (and symlinks never change once created). Even without -`relatime`, many filesystems record `atime` with a one-second -granularity, so only one update per second is required. - -It is easy to test if an `atime` update is needed while in RCU-walk -mode and, if it isn't, the update can be skipped and RCU-walk mode -continues. Only when an `atime` update is actually required does the -path walk drop down to REF-walk. All of this is handled in the -`get_link()` function. - -A few flags ------------ - -A suitable way to wrap up this tour of pathname walking is to list -the various flags that can be stored in the `nameidata` to guide the -lookup process. Many of these are only meaningful on the final -component, others reflect the current state of the pathname lookup. -And then there is `LOOKUP_EMPTY`, which doesn't fit conceptually with -the others. If this is not set, an empty pathname causes an error -very early on. If it is set, empty pathnames are not considered to be -an error. - -### Global state flags ### - -We have already met two global state flags: `LOOKUP_RCU` and -`LOOKUP_REVAL`. These select between one of three overall approaches -to lookup: RCU-walk, REF-walk, and REF-walk with forced revalidation. - -`LOOKUP_PARENT` indicates that the final component hasn't been reached -yet. This is primarily used to tell the audit subsystem the full -context of a particular access being audited. - -`LOOKUP_ROOT` indicates that the `root` field in the `nameidata` was -provided by the caller, so it shouldn't be released when it is no -longer needed. - -`LOOKUP_JUMPED` means that the current dentry was chosen not because -it had the right name but for some other reason. This happens when -following "`..`", following a symlink to `/`, crossing a mount point -or accessing a "`/proc/$PID/fd/$FD`" symlink. In this case the -filesystem has not been asked to revalidate the name (with -`d_revalidate()`). In such cases the inode may still need to be -revalidated, so `d_op->d_weak_revalidate()` is called if -`LOOKUP_JUMPED` is set when the look completes - which may be at the -final component or, when creating, unlinking, or renaming, at the penultimate component. - -### Final-component flags ### - -Some of these flags are only set when the final component is being -considered. Others are only checked for when considering that final -component. - -`LOOKUP_AUTOMOUNT` ensures that, if the final component is an automount -point, then the mount is triggered. Some operations would trigger it -anyway, but operations like `stat()` deliberately don't. `statfs()` -needs to trigger the mount but otherwise behaves a lot like `stat()`, so -it sets `LOOKUP_AUTOMOUNT`, as does "`quotactl()`" and the handling of -"`mount --bind`". - -`LOOKUP_FOLLOW` has a similar function to `LOOKUP_AUTOMOUNT` but for -symlinks. Some system calls set or clear it implicitly, while -others have API flags such as `AT_SYMLINK_FOLLOW` and -`UMOUNT_NOFOLLOW` to control it. Its effect is similar to -`WALK_GET` that we already met, but it is used in a different way. - -`LOOKUP_DIRECTORY` insists that the final component is a directory. -Various callers set this and it is also set when the final component -is found to be followed by a slash. - -Finally `LOOKUP_OPEN`, `LOOKUP_CREATE`, `LOOKUP_EXCL`, and -`LOOKUP_RENAME_TARGET` are not used directly by the VFS but are made -available to the filesystem and particularly the `->d_revalidate()` -method. A filesystem can choose not to bother revalidating too hard -if it knows that it will be asked to open or create the file soon. -These flags were previously useful for `->lookup()` too but with the -introduction of `->atomic_open()` they are less relevant there. - -End of the road ---------------- - -Despite its complexity, all this pathname lookup code appears to be -in good shape - various parts are certainly easier to understand now -than even a couple of releases ago. But that doesn't mean it is -"finished". As already mentioned, RCU-walk currently only follows -symlinks that are stored in the inode so, while it handles many ext4 -symlinks, it doesn't help with NFS, XFS, or Btrfs. That support -is not likely to be long delayed. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/path-lookup.rst b/Documentation/filesystems/path-lookup.rst @@ -0,0 +1,1346 @@ + +Introduction to pathname lookup +=============================== + +The most obvious aspect of pathname lookup, which very little +exploration is needed to discover, is that it is complex. There are +many rules, special cases, and implementation alternatives that all +combine to confuse the unwary reader. Computer science has long been +acquainted with such complexity and has tools to help manage it. One +tool that we will make extensive use of is "divide and conquer". For +the early parts of the analysis we will divide off symlinks - leaving +them until the final part. Well before we get to symlinks we have +another major division based on the VFS's approach to locking which +will allow us to review "REF-walk" and "RCU-walk" separately. But we +are getting ahead of ourselves. There are some important low level +distinctions we need to clarify first. + +There are two sorts of ... +-------------------------- + +.. _openat: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/openat.2.html + +Pathnames (sometimes "file names"), used to identify objects in the +filesystem, will be familiar to most readers. They contain two sorts +of elements: "slashes" that are sequences of one or more "``/``" +characters, and "components" that are sequences of one or more +non-"``/``" characters. These form two kinds of paths. Those that +start with slashes are "absolute" and start from the filesystem root. +The others are "relative" and start from the current directory, or +from some other location specified by a file descriptor given to a +"``XXXat``" system call such as `openat() <openat_>`_. + +.. _execveat: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/execveat.2.html + +It is tempting to describe the second kind as starting with a +component, but that isn't always accurate: a pathname can lack both +slashes and components, it can be empty, in other words. This is +generally forbidden in POSIX, but some of those "xxx``at``" system calls +in Linux permit it when the ``AT_EMPTY_PATH`` flag is given. For +example, if you have an open file descriptor on an executable file you +can execute it by calling `execveat() <execveat_>`_ passing +the file descriptor, an empty path, and the ``AT_EMPTY_PATH`` flag. + +These paths can be divided into two sections: the final component and +everything else. The "everything else" is the easy bit. In all cases +it must identify a directory that already exists, otherwise an error +such as ``ENOENT`` or ``ENOTDIR`` will be reported. + +The final component is not so simple. Not only do different system +calls interpret it quite differently (e.g. some create it, some do +not), but it might not even exist: neither the empty pathname nor the +pathname that is just slashes have a final component. If it does +exist, it could be "``.``" or "``..``" which are handled quite differently +from other components. + +.. _POSIX: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/V1_chap04.html#tag_04_12 + +If a pathname ends with a slash, such as "``/tmp/foo/``" it might be +tempting to consider that to have an empty final component. In many +ways that would lead to correct results, but not always. In +particular, ``mkdir()`` and ``rmdir()`` each create or remove a directory named +by the final component, and they are required to work with pathnames +ending in "``/``". According to POSIX_ + + A pathname that contains at least one non- &lt;slash> character and + that ends with one or more trailing &lt;slash> characters shall not + be resolved successfully unless the last pathname component before + the trailing <slash> characters names an existing directory or a + directory entry that is to be created for a directory immediately + after the pathname is resolved. + +The Linux pathname walking code (mostly in ``fs/namei.c``) deals with +all of these issues: breaking the path into components, handling the +"everything else" quite separately from the final component, and +checking that the trailing slash is not used where it isn't +permitted. It also addresses the important issue of concurrent +access. + +While one process is looking up a pathname, another might be making +changes that affect that lookup. One fairly extreme case is that if +"a/b" were renamed to "a/c/b" while another process were looking up +"a/b/..", that process might successfully resolve on "a/c". +Most races are much more subtle, and a big part of the task of +pathname lookup is to prevent them from having damaging effects. Many +of the possible races are seen most clearly in the context of the +"dcache" and an understanding of that is central to understanding +pathname lookup. + +More than just a cache +---------------------- + +The "dcache" caches information about names in each filesystem to +make them quickly available for lookup. Each entry (known as a +"dentry") contains three significant fields: a component name, a +pointer to a parent dentry, and a pointer to the "inode" which +contains further information about the object in that parent with +the given name. The inode pointer can be ``NULL`` indicating that the +name doesn't exist in the parent. While there can be linkage in the +dentry of a directory to the dentries of the children, that linkage is +not used for pathname lookup, and so will not be considered here. + +The dcache has a number of uses apart from accelerating lookup. One +that will be particularly relevant is that it is closely integrated +with the mount table that records which filesystem is mounted where. +What the mount table actually stores is which dentry is mounted on top +of which other dentry. + +When considering the dcache, we have another of our "two types" +distinctions: there are two types of filesystems. + +Some filesystems ensure that the information in the dcache is always +completely accurate (though not necessarily complete). This can allow +the VFS to determine if a particular file does or doesn't exist +without checking with the filesystem, and means that the VFS can +protect the filesystem against certain races and other problems. +These are typically "local" filesystems such as ext3, XFS, and Btrfs. + +Other filesystems don't provide that guarantee because they cannot. +These are typically filesystems that are shared across a network, +whether remote filesystems like NFS and 9P, or cluster filesystems +like ocfs2 or cephfs. These filesystems allow the VFS to revalidate +cached information, and must provide their own protection against +awkward races. The VFS can detect these filesystems by the +``DCACHE_OP_REVALIDATE`` flag being set in the dentry. + +REF-walk: simple concurrency management with refcounts and spinlocks +-------------------------------------------------------------------- + +With all of those divisions carefully classified, we can now start +looking at the actual process of walking along a path. In particular +we will start with the handling of the "everything else" part of a +pathname, and focus on the "REF-walk" approach to concurrency +management. This code is found in the ``link_path_walk()`` function, if +you ignore all the places that only run when "``LOOKUP_RCU``" +(indicating the use of RCU-walk) is set. + +.. _Meet the Lockers: https://lwn.net/Articles/453685/ + +REF-walk is fairly heavy-handed with locks and reference counts. Not +as heavy-handed as in the old "big kernel lock" days, but certainly not +afraid of taking a lock when one is needed. It uses a variety of +different concurrency controls. A background understanding of the +various primitives is assumed, or can be gleaned from elsewhere such +as in `Meet the Lockers`_. + +The locking mechanisms used by REF-walk include: + +dentry->d_lockref +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +This uses the lockref primitive to provide both a spinlock and a +reference count. The special-sauce of this primitive is that the +conceptual sequence "lock; inc_ref; unlock;" can often be performed +with a single atomic memory operation. + +Holding a reference on a dentry ensures that the dentry won't suddenly +be freed and used for something else, so the values in various fields +will behave as expected. It also protects the ``->d_inode`` reference +to the inode to some extent. + +The association between a dentry and its inode is fairly permanent. +For example, when a file is renamed, the dentry and inode move +together to the new location. When a file is created the dentry will +initially be negative (i.e. ``d_inode`` is ``NULL``), and will be assigned +to the new inode as part of the act of creation. + +When a file is deleted, this can be reflected in the cache either by +setting ``d_inode`` to ``NULL``, or by removing it from the hash table +(described shortly) used to look up the name in the parent directory. +If the dentry is still in use the second option is used as it is +perfectly legal to keep using an open file after it has been deleted +and having the dentry around helps. If the dentry is not otherwise in +use (i.e. if the refcount in ``d_lockref`` is one), only then will +``d_inode`` be set to ``NULL``. Doing it this way is more efficient for a +very common case. + +So as long as a counted reference is held to a dentry, a non-``NULL`` ``->d_inode`` +value will never be changed. + +dentry->d_lock +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +``d_lock`` is a synonym for the spinlock that is part of ``d_lockref`` above. +For our purposes, holding this lock protects against the dentry being +renamed or unlinked. In particular, its parent (``d_parent``), and its +name (``d_name``) cannot be changed, and it cannot be removed from the +dentry hash table. + +When looking for a name in a directory, REF-walk takes ``d_lock`` on +each candidate dentry that it finds in the hash table and then checks +that the parent and name are correct. So it doesn't lock the parent +while searching in the cache; it only locks children. + +When looking for the parent for a given name (to handle "``..``"), +REF-walk can take ``d_lock`` to get a stable reference to ``d_parent``, +but it first tries a more lightweight approach. As seen in +``dget_parent()``, if a reference can be claimed on the parent, and if +subsequently ``d_parent`` can be seen to have not changed, then there is +no need to actually take the lock on the child. + +rename_lock +~~~~~~~~~~~ + +Looking up a given name in a given directory involves computing a hash +from the two values (the name and the dentry of the directory), +accessing that slot in a hash table, and searching the linked list +that is found there. + +When a dentry is renamed, the name and the parent dentry can both +change so the hash will almost certainly change too. This would move the +dentry to a different chain in the hash table. If a filename search +happened to be looking at a dentry that was moved in this way, +it might end up continuing the search down the wrong chain, +and so miss out on part of the correct chain. + +The name-lookup process (``d_lookup()``) does _not_ try to prevent this +from happening, but only to detect when it happens. +``rename_lock`` is a seqlock that is updated whenever any dentry is +renamed. If ``d_lookup`` finds that a rename happened while it +unsuccessfully scanned a chain in the hash table, it simply tries +again. + +inode->i_rwsem +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +``i_rwsem`` is a read/write semaphore that serializes all changes to a particular +directory. This ensures that, for example, an ``unlink()`` and a ``rename()`` +cannot both happen at the same time. It also keeps the directory +stable while the filesystem is asked to look up a name that is not +currently in the dcache or, optionally, when the list of entries in a +directory is being retrieved with ``readdir()``. + +This has a complementary role to that of ``d_lock``: ``i_rwsem`` on a +directory protects all of the names in that directory, while ``d_lock`` +on a name protects just one name in a directory. Most changes to the +dcache hold ``i_rwsem`` on the relevant directory inode and briefly take +``d_lock`` on one or more the dentries while the change happens. One +exception is when idle dentries are removed from the dcache due to +memory pressure. This uses ``d_lock``, but ``i_rwsem`` plays no role. + +The semaphore affects pathname lookup in two distinct ways. Firstly it +prevents changes during lookup of a name in a directory. ``walk_component()`` uses +``lookup_fast()`` first which, in turn, checks to see if the name is in the cache, +using only ``d_lock`` locking. If the name isn't found, then ``walk_component()`` +falls back to ``lookup_slow()`` which takes a shared lock on ``i_rwsem``, checks again that +the name isn't in the cache, and then calls in to the filesystem to get a +definitive answer. A new dentry will be added to the cache regardless of +the result. + +Secondly, when pathname lookup reaches the final component, it will +sometimes need to take an exclusive lock on ``i_rwsem`` before performing the last lookup so +that the required exclusion can be achieved. How path lookup chooses +to take, or not take, ``i_rwsem`` is one of the +issues addressed in a subsequent section. + +If two threads attempt to look up the same name at the same time - a +name that is not yet in the dcache - the shared lock on ``i_rwsem`` will +not prevent them both adding new dentries with the same name. As this +would result in confusion an extra level of interlocking is used, +based around a secondary hash table (``in_lookup_hashtable``) and a +per-dentry flag bit (``DCACHE_PAR_LOOKUP``). + +To add a new dentry to the cache while only holding a shared lock on +``i_rwsem``, a thread must call ``d_alloc_parallel()``. This allocates a +dentry, stores the required name and parent in it, checks if there +is already a matching dentry in the primary or secondary hash +tables, and if not, stores the newly allocated dentry in the secondary +hash table, with ``DCACHE_PAR_LOOKUP`` set. + +If a matching dentry was found in the primary hash table then that is +returned and the caller can know that it lost a race with some other +thread adding the entry. If no matching dentry is found in either +cache, the newly allocated dentry is returned and the caller can +detect this from the presence of ``DCACHE_PAR_LOOKUP``. In this case it +knows that it has won any race and now is responsible for asking the +filesystem to perform the lookup and find the matching inode. When +the lookup is complete, it must call ``d_lookup_done()`` which clears +the flag and does some other house keeping, including removing the +dentry from the secondary hash table - it will normally have been +added to the primary hash table already. Note that a ``struct +waitqueue_head`` is passed to ``d_alloc_parallel()``, and +``d_lookup_done()`` must be called while this ``waitqueue_head`` is still +in scope. + +If a matching dentry is found in the secondary hash table, +``d_alloc_parallel()`` has a little more work to do. It first waits for +``DCACHE_PAR_LOOKUP`` to be cleared, using a wait_queue that was passed +to the instance of ``d_alloc_parallel()`` that won the race and that +will be woken by the call to ``d_lookup_done()``. It then checks to see +if the dentry has now been added to the primary hash table. If it +has, the dentry is returned and the caller just sees that it lost any +race. If it hasn't been added to the primary hash table, the most +likely explanation is that some other dentry was added instead using +``d_splice_alias()``. In any case, ``d_alloc_parallel()`` repeats all the +look ups from the start and will normally return something from the +primary hash table. + +mnt->mnt_count +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +``mnt_count`` is a per-CPU reference counter on "``mount``" structures. +Per-CPU here means that incrementing the count is cheap as it only +uses CPU-local memory, but checking if the count is zero is expensive as +it needs to check with every CPU. Taking a ``mnt_count`` reference +prevents the mount structure from disappearing as the result of regular +unmount operations, but does not prevent a "lazy" unmount. So holding +``mnt_count`` doesn't ensure that the mount remains in the namespace and, +in particular, doesn't stabilize the link to the mounted-on dentry. It +does, however, ensure that the ``mount`` data structure remains coherent, +and it provides a reference to the root dentry of the mounted +filesystem. So a reference through ``->mnt_count`` provides a stable +reference to the mounted dentry, but not the mounted-on dentry. + +mount_lock +~~~~~~~~~~ + +``mount_lock`` is a global seqlock, a bit like ``rename_lock``. It can be used to +check if any change has been made to any mount points. + +While walking down the tree (away from the root) this lock is used when +crossing a mount point to check that the crossing was safe. That is, +the value in the seqlock is read, then the code finds the mount that +is mounted on the current directory, if there is one, and increments +the ``mnt_count``. Finally the value in ``mount_lock`` is checked against +the old value. If there is no change, then the crossing was safe. If there +was a change, the ``mnt_count`` is decremented and the whole process is +retried. + +When walking up the tree (towards the root) by following a ".." link, +a little more care is needed. In this case the seqlock (which +contains both a counter and a spinlock) is fully locked to prevent +any changes to any mount points while stepping up. This locking is +needed to stabilize the link to the mounted-on dentry, which the +refcount on the mount itself doesn't ensure. + +RCU +~~~ + +Finally the global (but extremely lightweight) RCU read lock is held +from time to time to ensure certain data structures don't get freed +unexpectedly. + +In particular it is held while scanning chains in the dcache hash +table, and the mount point hash table. + +Bringing it together with ``struct nameidata`` +-------------------------------------------- + +.. _First edition Unix: http://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=V1/u2.s + +Throughout the process of walking a path, the current status is stored +in a ``struct nameidata``, "namei" being the traditional name - dating +all the way back to `First Edition Unix`_ - of the function that +converts a "name" to an "inode". ``struct nameidata`` contains (among +other fields): + +``struct path path`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +A ``path`` contains a ``struct vfsmount`` (which is +embedded in a ``struct mount``) and a ``struct dentry``. Together these +record the current status of the walk. They start out referring to the +starting point (the current working directory, the root directory, or some other +directory identified by a file descriptor), and are updated on each +step. A reference through ``d_lockref`` and ``mnt_count`` is always +held. + +``struct qstr last`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +This is a string together with a length (i.e. _not_ ``nul`` terminated) +that is the "next" component in the pathname. + +``int last_type`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +This is one of ``LAST_NORM``, ``LAST_ROOT``, ``LAST_DOT``, ``LAST_DOTDOT``, or +``LAST_BIND``. The ``last`` field is only valid if the type is +``LAST_NORM``. ``LAST_BIND`` is used when following a symlink and no +components of the symlink have been processed yet. Others should be +fairly self-explanatory. + +``struct path root`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +This is used to hold a reference to the effective root of the +filesystem. Often that reference won't be needed, so this field is +only assigned the first time it is used, or when a non-standard root +is requested. Keeping a reference in the ``nameidata`` ensures that +only one root is in effect for the entire path walk, even if it races +with a ``chroot()`` system call. + +The root is needed when either of two conditions holds: (1) either the +pathname or a symbolic link starts with a "'/'", or (2) a "``..``" +component is being handled, since "``..``" from the root must always stay +at the root. The value used is usually the current root directory of +the calling process. An alternate root can be provided as when +``sysctl()`` calls ``file_open_root()``, and when NFSv4 or Btrfs call +``mount_subtree()``. In each case a pathname is being looked up in a very +specific part of the filesystem, and the lookup must not be allowed to +escape that subtree. It works a bit like a local ``chroot()``. + +Ignoring the handling of symbolic links, we can now describe the +"``link_path_walk()``" function, which handles the lookup of everything +except the final component as: + + Given a path (``name``) and a nameidata structure (``nd``), check that the + current directory has execute permission and then advance ``name`` + over one component while updating ``last_type`` and ``last``. If that + was the final component, then return, otherwise call + ``walk_component()`` and repeat from the top. + +``walk_component()`` is even easier. If the component is ``LAST_DOTS``, +it calls ``handle_dots()`` which does the necessary locking as already +described. If it finds a ``LAST_NORM`` component it first calls +"``lookup_fast()``" which only looks in the dcache, but will ask the +filesystem to revalidate the result if it is that sort of filesystem. +If that doesn't get a good result, it calls "``lookup_slow()``" which +takes ``i_rwsem``, rechecks the cache, and then asks the filesystem +to find a definitive answer. Each of these will call +``follow_managed()`` (as described below) to handle any mount points. + +In the absence of symbolic links, ``walk_component()`` creates a new +``struct path`` containing a counted reference to the new dentry and a +reference to the new ``vfsmount`` which is only counted if it is +different from the previous ``vfsmount``. It then calls +``path_to_nameidata()`` to install the new ``struct path`` in the +``struct nameidata`` and drop the unneeded references. + +This "hand-over-hand" sequencing of getting a reference to the new +dentry before dropping the reference to the previous dentry may +seem obvious, but is worth pointing out so that we will recognize its +analogue in the "RCU-walk" version. + +Handling the final component +---------------------------- + +``link_path_walk()`` only walks as far as setting ``nd->last`` and +``nd->last_type`` to refer to the final component of the path. It does +not call ``walk_component()`` that last time. Handling that final +component remains for the caller to sort out. Those callers are +``path_lookupat()``, ``path_parentat()``, ``path_mountpoint()`` and +``path_openat()`` each of which handles the differing requirements of +different system calls. + +``path_parentat()`` is clearly the simplest - it just wraps a little bit +of housekeeping around ``link_path_walk()`` and returns the parent +directory and final component to the caller. The caller will be either +aiming to create a name (via ``filename_create()``) or remove or rename +a name (in which case ``user_path_parent()`` is used). They will use +``i_rwsem`` to exclude other changes while they validate and then +perform their operation. + +``path_lookupat()`` is nearly as simple - it is used when an existing +object is wanted such as by ``stat()`` or ``chmod()``. It essentially just +calls ``walk_component()`` on the final component through a call to +``lookup_last()``. ``path_lookupat()`` returns just the final dentry. + +``path_mountpoint()`` handles the special case of unmounting which must +not try to revalidate the mounted filesystem. It effectively +contains, through a call to ``mountpoint_last()``, an alternate +implementation of ``lookup_slow()`` which skips that step. This is +important when unmounting a filesystem that is inaccessible, such as +one provided by a dead NFS server. + +Finally ``path_openat()`` is used for the ``open()`` system call; it +contains, in support functions starting with "``do_last()``", all the +complexity needed to handle the different subtleties of O_CREAT (with +or without O_EXCL), final "``/``" characters, and trailing symbolic +links. We will revisit this in the final part of this series, which +focuses on those symbolic links. "``do_last()``" will sometimes, but +not always, take ``i_rwsem``, depending on what it finds. + +Each of these, or the functions which call them, need to be alert to +the possibility that the final component is not ``LAST_NORM``. If the +goal of the lookup is to create something, then any value for +``last_type`` other than ``LAST_NORM`` will result in an error. For +example if ``path_parentat()`` reports ``LAST_DOTDOT``, then the caller +won't try to create that name. They also check for trailing slashes +by testing ``last.name[last.len]``. If there is any character beyond +the final component, it must be a trailing slash. + +Revalidation and automounts +--------------------------- + +Apart from symbolic links, there are only two parts of the "REF-walk" +process not yet covered. One is the handling of stale cache entries +and the other is automounts. + +On filesystems that require it, the lookup routines will call the +``->d_revalidate()`` dentry method to ensure that the cached information +is current. This will often confirm validity or update a few details +from a server. In some cases it may find that there has been change +further up the path and that something that was thought to be valid +previously isn't really. When this happens the lookup of the whole +path is aborted and retried with the "``LOOKUP_REVAL``" flag set. This +forces revalidation to be more thorough. We will see more details of +this retry process in the next article. + +Automount points are locations in the filesystem where an attempt to +lookup a name can trigger changes to how that lookup should be +handled, in particular by mounting a filesystem there. These are +covered in greater detail in autofs.txt in the Linux documentation +tree, but a few notes specifically related to path lookup are in order +here. + +The Linux VFS has a concept of "managed" dentries which is reflected +in function names such as "``follow_managed()``". There are three +potentially interesting things about these dentries corresponding +to three different flags that might be set in ``dentry->d_flags``: + +``DCACHE_MANAGE_TRANSIT`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +If this flag has been set, then the filesystem has requested that the +``d_manage()`` dentry operation be called before handling any possible +mount point. This can perform two particular services: + +It can block to avoid races. If an automount point is being +unmounted, the ``d_manage()`` function will usually wait for that +process to complete before letting the new lookup proceed and possibly +trigger a new automount. + +It can selectively allow only some processes to transit through a +mount point. When a server process is managing automounts, it may +need to access a directory without triggering normal automount +processing. That server process can identify itself to the ``autofs`` +filesystem, which will then give it a special pass through +``d_manage()`` by returning ``-EISDIR``. + +``DCACHE_MOUNTED`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +This flag is set on every dentry that is mounted on. As Linux +supports multiple filesystem namespaces, it is possible that the +dentry may not be mounted on in *this* namespace, just in some +other. So this flag is seen as a hint, not a promise. + +If this flag is set, and ``d_manage()`` didn't return ``-EISDIR``, +``lookup_mnt()`` is called to examine the mount hash table (honoring the +``mount_lock`` described earlier) and possibly return a new ``vfsmount`` +and a new ``dentry`` (both with counted references). + +``DCACHE_NEED_AUTOMOUNT`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +If ``d_manage()`` allowed us to get this far, and ``lookup_mnt()`` didn't +find a mount point, then this flag causes the ``d_automount()`` dentry +operation to be called. + +The ``d_automount()`` operation can be arbitrarily complex and may +communicate with server processes etc. but it should ultimately either +report that there was an error, that there was nothing to mount, or +should provide an updated ``struct path`` with new ``dentry`` and ``vfsmount``. + +In the latter case, ``finish_automount()`` will be called to safely +install the new mount point into the mount table. + +There is no new locking of import here and it is important that no +locks (only counted references) are held over this processing due to +the very real possibility of extended delays. +This will become more important next time when we examine RCU-walk +which is particularly sensitive to delays. + +RCU-walk - faster pathname lookup in Linux +========================================== + +RCU-walk is another algorithm for performing pathname lookup in Linux. +It is in many ways similar to REF-walk and the two share quite a bit +of code. The significant difference in RCU-walk is how it allows for +the possibility of concurrent access. + +We noted that REF-walk is complex because there are numerous details +and special cases. RCU-walk reduces this complexity by simply +refusing to handle a number of cases -- it instead falls back to +REF-walk. The difficulty with RCU-walk comes from a different +direction: unfamiliarity. The locking rules when depending on RCU are +quite different from traditional locking, so we will spend a little extra +time when we come to those. + +Clear demarcation of roles +-------------------------- + +The easiest way to manage concurrency is to forcibly stop any other +thread from changing the data structures that a given thread is +looking at. In cases where no other thread would even think of +changing the data and lots of different threads want to read at the +same time, this can be very costly. Even when using locks that permit +multiple concurrent readers, the simple act of updating the count of +the number of current readers can impose an unwanted cost. So the +goal when reading a shared data structure that no other process is +changing is to avoid writing anything to memory at all. Take no +locks, increment no counts, leave no footprints. + +The REF-walk mechanism already described certainly doesn't follow this +principle, but then it is really designed to work when there may well +be other threads modifying the data. RCU-walk, in contrast, is +designed for the common situation where there are lots of frequent +readers and only occasional writers. This may not be common in all +parts of the filesystem tree, but in many parts it will be. For the +other parts it is important that RCU-walk can quickly fall back to +using REF-walk. + +Pathname lookup always starts in RCU-walk mode but only remains there +as long as what it is looking for is in the cache and is stable. It +dances lightly down the cached filesystem image, leaving no footprints +and carefully watching where it is, to be sure it doesn't trip. If it +notices that something has changed or is changing, or if something +isn't in the cache, then it tries to stop gracefully and switch to +REF-walk. + +This stopping requires getting a counted reference on the current +``vfsmount`` and ``dentry``, and ensuring that these are still valid - +that a path walk with REF-walk would have found the same entries. +This is an invariant that RCU-walk must guarantee. It can only make +decisions, such as selecting the next step, that are decisions which +REF-walk could also have made if it were walking down the tree at the +same time. If the graceful stop succeeds, the rest of the path is +processed with the reliable, if slightly sluggish, REF-walk. If +RCU-walk finds it cannot stop gracefully, it simply gives up and +restarts from the top with REF-walk. + +This pattern of "try RCU-walk, if that fails try REF-walk" can be +clearly seen in functions like ``filename_lookup()``, +``filename_parentat()``, ``filename_mountpoint()``, +``do_filp_open()``, and ``do_file_open_root()``. These five +correspond roughly to the four ``path_``* functions we met earlier, +each of which calls ``link_path_walk()``. The ``path_*`` functions are +called using different mode flags until a mode is found which works. +They are first called with ``LOOKUP_RCU`` set to request "RCU-walk". If +that fails with the error ``ECHILD`` they are called again with no +special flag to request "REF-walk". If either of those report the +error ``ESTALE`` a final attempt is made with ``LOOKUP_REVAL`` set (and no +``LOOKUP_RCU``) to ensure that entries found in the cache are forcibly +revalidated - normally entries are only revalidated if the filesystem +determines that they are too old to trust. + +The ``LOOKUP_RCU`` attempt may drop that flag internally and switch to +REF-walk, but will never then try to switch back to RCU-walk. Places +that trip up RCU-walk are much more likely to be near the leaves and +so it is very unlikely that there will be much, if any, benefit from +switching back. + +RCU and seqlocks: fast and light +-------------------------------- + +RCU is, unsurprisingly, critical to RCU-walk mode. The +``rcu_read_lock()`` is held for the entire time that RCU-walk is walking +down a path. The particular guarantee it provides is that the key +data structures - dentries, inodes, super_blocks, and mounts - will +not be freed while the lock is held. They might be unlinked or +invalidated in one way or another, but the memory will not be +repurposed so values in various fields will still be meaningful. This +is the only guarantee that RCU provides; everything else is done using +seqlocks. + +As we saw above, REF-walk holds a counted reference to the current +dentry and the current vfsmount, and does not release those references +before taking references to the "next" dentry or vfsmount. It also +sometimes takes the ``d_lock`` spinlock. These references and locks are +taken to prevent certain changes from happening. RCU-walk must not +take those references or locks and so cannot prevent such changes. +Instead, it checks to see if a change has been made, and aborts or +retries if it has. + +To preserve the invariant mentioned above (that RCU-walk may only make +decisions that REF-walk could have made), it must make the checks at +or near the same places that REF-walk holds the references. So, when +REF-walk increments a reference count or takes a spinlock, RCU-walk +samples the status of a seqlock using ``read_seqcount_begin()`` or a +similar function. When REF-walk decrements the count or drops the +lock, RCU-walk checks if the sampled status is still valid using +``read_seqcount_retry()`` or similar. + +However, there is a little bit more to seqlocks than that. If +RCU-walk accesses two different fields in a seqlock-protected +structure, or accesses the same field twice, there is no a priori +guarantee of any consistency between those accesses. When consistency +is needed - which it usually is - RCU-walk must take a copy and then +use ``read_seqcount_retry()`` to validate that copy. + +``read_seqcount_retry()`` not only checks the sequence number, but also +imposes a memory barrier so that no memory-read instruction from +*before* the call can be delayed until *after* the call, either by the +CPU or by the compiler. A simple example of this can be seen in +``slow_dentry_cmp()`` which, for filesystems which do not use simple +byte-wise name equality, calls into the filesystem to compare a name +against a dentry. The length and name pointer are copied into local +variables, then ``read_seqcount_retry()`` is called to confirm the two +are consistent, and only then is ``->d_compare()`` called. When +standard filename comparison is used, ``dentry_cmp()`` is called +instead. Notably it does _not_ use ``read_seqcount_retry()``, but +instead has a large comment explaining why the consistency guarantee +isn't necessary. A subsequent ``read_seqcount_retry()`` will be +sufficient to catch any problem that could occur at this point. + +With that little refresher on seqlocks out of the way we can look at +the bigger picture of how RCU-walk uses seqlocks. + +``mount_lock`` and ``nd->m_seq`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +We already met the ``mount_lock`` seqlock when REF-walk used it to +ensure that crossing a mount point is performed safely. RCU-walk uses +it for that too, but for quite a bit more. + +Instead of taking a counted reference to each ``vfsmount`` as it +descends the tree, RCU-walk samples the state of ``mount_lock`` at the +start of the walk and stores this initial sequence number in the +``struct nameidata`` in the ``m_seq`` field. This one lock and one +sequence number are used to validate all accesses to all ``vfsmounts``, +and all mount point crossings. As changes to the mount table are +relatively rare, it is reasonable to fall back on REF-walk any time +that any "mount" or "unmount" happens. + +``m_seq`` is checked (using ``read_seqretry()``) at the end of an RCU-walk +sequence, whether switching to REF-walk for the rest of the path or +when the end of the path is reached. It is also checked when stepping +down over a mount point (in ``__follow_mount_rcu()``) or up (in +``follow_dotdot_rcu()``). If it is ever found to have changed, the +whole RCU-walk sequence is aborted and the path is processed again by +REF-walk. + +If RCU-walk finds that ``mount_lock`` hasn't changed then it can be sure +that, had REF-walk taken counted references on each vfsmount, the +results would have been the same. This ensures the invariant holds, +at least for vfsmount structures. + +``dentry->d_seq`` and ``nd->seq`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +In place of taking a count or lock on ``d_reflock``, RCU-walk samples +the per-dentry ``d_seq`` seqlock, and stores the sequence number in the +``seq`` field of the nameidata structure, so ``nd->seq`` should always be +the current sequence number of ``nd->dentry``. This number needs to be +revalidated after copying, and before using, the name, parent, or +inode of the dentry. + +The handling of the name we have already looked at, and the parent is +only accessed in ``follow_dotdot_rcu()`` which fairly trivially follows +the required pattern, though it does so for three different cases. + +When not at a mount point, ``d_parent`` is followed and its ``d_seq`` is +collected. When we are at a mount point, we instead follow the +``mnt->mnt_mountpoint`` link to get a new dentry and collect its +``d_seq``. Then, after finally finding a ``d_parent`` to follow, we must +check if we have landed on a mount point and, if so, must find that +mount point and follow the ``mnt->mnt_root`` link. This would imply a +somewhat unusual, but certainly possible, circumstance where the +starting point of the path lookup was in part of the filesystem that +was mounted on, and so not visible from the root. + +The inode pointer, stored in ``->d_inode``, is a little more +interesting. The inode will always need to be accessed at least +twice, once to determine if it is NULL and once to verify access +permissions. Symlink handling requires a validated inode pointer too. +Rather than revalidating on each access, a copy is made on the first +access and it is stored in the ``inode`` field of ``nameidata`` from where +it can be safely accessed without further validation. + +``lookup_fast()`` is the only lookup routine that is used in RCU-mode, +``lookup_slow()`` being too slow and requiring locks. It is in +``lookup_fast()`` that we find the important "hand over hand" tracking +of the current dentry. + +The current ``dentry`` and current ``seq`` number are passed to +``__d_lookup_rcu()`` which, on success, returns a new ``dentry`` and a +new ``seq`` number. ``lookup_fast()`` then copies the inode pointer and +revalidates the new ``seq`` number. It then validates the old ``dentry`` +with the old ``seq`` number one last time and only then continues. This +process of getting the ``seq`` number of the new dentry and then +checking the ``seq`` number of the old exactly mirrors the process of +getting a counted reference to the new dentry before dropping that for +the old dentry which we saw in REF-walk. + +No ``inode->i_rwsem`` or even ``rename_lock`` +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +A semaphore is a fairly heavyweight lock that can only be taken when it is +permissible to sleep. As ``rcu_read_lock()`` forbids sleeping, +``inode->i_rwsem`` plays no role in RCU-walk. If some other thread does +take ``i_rwsem`` and modifies the directory in a way that RCU-walk needs +to notice, the result will be either that RCU-walk fails to find the +dentry that it is looking for, or it will find a dentry which +``read_seqretry()`` won't validate. In either case it will drop down to +REF-walk mode which can take whatever locks are needed. + +Though ``rename_lock`` could be used by RCU-walk as it doesn't require +any sleeping, RCU-walk doesn't bother. REF-walk uses ``rename_lock`` to +protect against the possibility of hash chains in the dcache changing +while they are being searched. This can result in failing to find +something that actually is there. When RCU-walk fails to find +something in the dentry cache, whether it is really there or not, it +already drops down to REF-walk and tries again with appropriate +locking. This neatly handles all cases, so adding extra checks on +rename_lock would bring no significant value. + +``unlazy walk()`` and ``complete_walk()`` +------------------------------------- + +That "dropping down to REF-walk" typically involves a call to +``unlazy_walk()``, so named because "RCU-walk" is also sometimes +referred to as "lazy walk". ``unlazy_walk()`` is called when +following the path down to the current vfsmount/dentry pair seems to +have proceeded successfully, but the next step is problematic. This +can happen if the next name cannot be found in the dcache, if +permission checking or name revalidation couldn't be achieved while +the ``rcu_read_lock()`` is held (which forbids sleeping), if an +automount point is found, or in a couple of cases involving symlinks. +It is also called from ``complete_walk()`` when the lookup has reached +the final component, or the very end of the path, depending on which +particular flavor of lookup is used. + +Other reasons for dropping out of RCU-walk that do not trigger a call +to ``unlazy_walk()`` are when some inconsistency is found that cannot be +handled immediately, such as ``mount_lock`` or one of the ``d_seq`` +seqlocks reporting a change. In these cases the relevant function +will return ``-ECHILD`` which will percolate up until it triggers a new +attempt from the top using REF-walk. + +For those cases where ``unlazy_walk()`` is an option, it essentially +takes a reference on each of the pointers that it holds (vfsmount, +dentry, and possibly some symbolic links) and then verifies that the +relevant seqlocks have not been changed. If there have been changes, +it, too, aborts with ``-ECHILD``, otherwise the transition to REF-walk +has been a success and the lookup process continues. + +Taking a reference on those pointers is not quite as simple as just +incrementing a counter. That works to take a second reference if you +already have one (often indirectly through another object), but it +isn't sufficient if you don't actually have a counted reference at +all. For ``dentry->d_lockref``, it is safe to increment the reference +counter to get a reference unless it has been explicitly marked as +"dead" which involves setting the counter to ``-128``. +``lockref_get_not_dead()`` achieves this. + +For ``mnt->mnt_count`` it is safe to take a reference as long as +``mount_lock`` is then used to validate the reference. If that +validation fails, it may *not* be safe to just drop that reference in +the standard way of calling ``mnt_put()`` - an unmount may have +progressed too far. So the code in ``legitimize_mnt()``, when it +finds that the reference it got might not be safe, checks the +``MNT_SYNC_UMOUNT`` flag to determine if a simple ``mnt_put()`` is +correct, or if it should just decrement the count and pretend none of +this ever happened. + +Taking care in filesystems +-------------------------- + +RCU-walk depends almost entirely on cached information and often will +not call into the filesystem at all. However there are two places, +besides the already-mentioned component-name comparison, where the +file system might be included in RCU-walk, and it must know to be +careful. + +If the filesystem has non-standard permission-checking requirements - +such as a networked filesystem which may need to check with the server +- the ``i_op->permission`` interface might be called during RCU-walk. +In this case an extra "``MAY_NOT_BLOCK``" flag is passed so that it +knows not to sleep, but to return ``-ECHILD`` if it cannot complete +promptly. ``i_op->permission`` is given the inode pointer, not the +dentry, so it doesn't need to worry about further consistency checks. +However if it accesses any other filesystem data structures, it must +ensure they are safe to be accessed with only the ``rcu_read_lock()`` +held. This typically means they must be freed using ``kfree_rcu()`` or +similar. + +.. _READ_ONCE: https://lwn.net/Articles/624126/ + +If the filesystem may need to revalidate dcache entries, then +``d_op->d_revalidate`` may be called in RCU-walk too. This interface +*is* passed the dentry but does not have access to the ``inode`` or the +``seq`` number from the ``nameidata``, so it needs to be extra careful +when accessing fields in the dentry. This "extra care" typically +involves using `READ_ONCE() <READ_ONCE_>`_ to access fields, and verifying the +result is not NULL before using it. This pattern can be seen in +``nfs_lookup_revalidate()``. + +A pair of patterns +------------------ + +In various places in the details of REF-walk and RCU-walk, and also in +the big picture, there are a couple of related patterns that are worth +being aware of. + +The first is "try quickly and check, if that fails try slowly". We +can see that in the high-level approach of first trying RCU-walk and +then trying REF-walk, and in places where ``unlazy_walk()`` is used to +switch to REF-walk for the rest of the path. We also saw it earlier +in ``dget_parent()`` when following a "``..``" link. It tries a quick way +to get a reference, then falls back to taking locks if needed. + +The second pattern is "try quickly and check, if that fails try +again - repeatedly". This is seen with the use of ``rename_lock`` and +``mount_lock`` in REF-walk. RCU-walk doesn't make use of this pattern - +if anything goes wrong it is much safer to just abort and try a more +sedate approach. + +The emphasis here is "try quickly and check". It should probably be +"try quickly _and carefully,_ then check". The fact that checking is +needed is a reminder that the system is dynamic and only a limited +number of things are safe at all. The most likely cause of errors in +this whole process is assuming something is safe when in reality it +isn't. Careful consideration of what exactly guarantees the safety of +each access is sometimes necessary. + +A walk among the symlinks +========================= + +There are several basic issues that we will examine to understand the +handling of symbolic links: the symlink stack, together with cache +lifetimes, will help us understand the overall recursive handling of +symlinks and lead to the special care needed for the final component. +Then a consideration of access-time updates and summary of the various +flags controlling lookup will finish the story. + +The symlink stack +----------------- + +There are only two sorts of filesystem objects that can usefully +appear in a path prior to the final component: directories and symlinks. +Handling directories is quite straightforward: the new directory +simply becomes the starting point at which to interpret the next +component on the path. Handling symbolic links requires a bit more +work. + +Conceptually, symbolic links could be handled by editing the path. If +a component name refers to a symbolic link, then that component is +replaced by the body of the link and, if that body starts with a '/', +then all preceding parts of the path are discarded. This is what the +"``readlink -f``" command does, though it also edits out "``.``" and +"``..``" components. + +Directly editing the path string is not really necessary when looking +up a path, and discarding early components is pointless as they aren't +looked at anyway. Keeping track of all remaining components is +important, but they can of course be kept separately; there is no need +to concatenate them. As one symlink may easily refer to another, +which in turn can refer to a third, we may need to keep the remaining +components of several paths, each to be processed when the preceding +ones are completed. These path remnants are kept on a stack of +limited size. + +There are two reasons for placing limits on how many symlinks can +occur in a single path lookup. The most obvious is to avoid loops. +If a symlink referred to itself either directly or through +intermediaries, then following the symlink can never complete +successfully - the error ``ELOOP`` must be returned. Loops can be +detected without imposing limits, but limits are the simplest solution +and, given the second reason for restriction, quite sufficient. + +.. _outlined recently: http://thread.gmane.org/gmane.linux.kernel/1934390/focus=1934550 + +The second reason was `outlined recently`_ by Linus: + + Because it's a latency and DoS issue too. We need to react well to + true loops, but also to "very deep" non-loops. It's not about memory + use, it's about users triggering unreasonable CPU resources. + +Linux imposes a limit on the length of any pathname: ``PATH_MAX``, which +is 4096. There are a number of reasons for this limit; not letting the +kernel spend too much time on just one path is one of them. With +symbolic links you can effectively generate much longer paths so some +sort of limit is needed for the same reason. Linux imposes a limit of +at most 40 symlinks in any one path lookup. It previously imposed a +further limit of eight on the maximum depth of recursion, but that was +raised to 40 when a separate stack was implemented, so there is now +just the one limit. + +The ``nameidata`` structure that we met in an earlier article contains a +small stack that can be used to store the remaining part of up to two +symlinks. In many cases this will be sufficient. If it isn't, a +separate stack is allocated with room for 40 symlinks. Pathname +lookup will never exceed that stack as, once the 40th symlink is +detected, an error is returned. + +It might seem that the name remnants are all that needs to be stored on +this stack, but we need a bit more. To see that, we need to move on to +cache lifetimes. + +Storage and lifetime of cached symlinks +--------------------------------------- + +Like other filesystem resources, such as inodes and directory +entries, symlinks are cached by Linux to avoid repeated costly access +to external storage. It is particularly important for RCU-walk to be +able to find and temporarily hold onto these cached entries, so that +it doesn't need to drop down into REF-walk. + +.. _object-oriented design pattern: https://lwn.net/Articles/446317/ + +While each filesystem is free to make its own choice, symlinks are +typically stored in one of two places. Short symlinks are often +stored directly in the inode. When a filesystem allocates a ``struct +inode`` it typically allocates extra space to store private data (a +common `object-oriented design pattern`_ in the kernel). This will +sometimes include space for a symlink. The other common location is +in the page cache, which normally stores the content of files. The +pathname in a symlink can be seen as the content of that symlink and +can easily be stored in the page cache just like file content. + +When neither of these is suitable, the next most likely scenario is +that the filesystem will allocate some temporary memory and copy or +construct the symlink content into that memory whenever it is needed. + +When the symlink is stored in the inode, it has the same lifetime as +the inode which, itself, is protected by RCU or by a counted reference +on the dentry. This means that the mechanisms that pathname lookup +uses to access the dcache and icache (inode cache) safely are quite +sufficient for accessing some cached symlinks safely. In these cases, +the ``i_link`` pointer in the inode is set to point to wherever the +symlink is stored and it can be accessed directly whenever needed. + +When the symlink is stored in the page cache or elsewhere, the +situation is not so straightforward. A reference on a dentry or even +on an inode does not imply any reference on cached pages of that +inode, and even an ``rcu_read_lock()`` is not sufficient to ensure that +a page will not disappear. So for these symlinks the pathname lookup +code needs to ask the filesystem to provide a stable reference and, +significantly, needs to release that reference when it is finished +with it. + +Taking a reference to a cache page is often possible even in RCU-walk +mode. It does require making changes to memory, which is best avoided, +but that isn't necessarily a big cost and it is better than dropping +out of RCU-walk mode completely. Even filesystems that allocate +space to copy the symlink into can use ``GFP_ATOMIC`` to often successfully +allocate memory without the need to drop out of RCU-walk. If a +filesystem cannot successfully get a reference in RCU-walk mode, it +must return ``-ECHILD`` and ``unlazy_walk()`` will be called to return to +REF-walk mode in which the filesystem is allowed to sleep. + +The place for all this to happen is the ``i_op->follow_link()`` inode +method. In the present mainline code this is never actually called in +RCU-walk mode as the rewrite is not quite complete. It is likely that +in a future release this method will be passed an ``inode`` pointer when +called in RCU-walk mode so it both (1) knows to be careful, and (2) has the +validated pointer. Much like the ``i_op->permission()`` method we +looked at previously, ``->follow_link()`` would need to be careful that +all the data structures it references are safe to be accessed while +holding no counted reference, only the RCU lock. Though getting a +reference with ``->follow_link()`` is not yet done in RCU-walk mode, the +code is ready to release the reference when that does happen. + +This need to drop the reference to a symlink adds significant +complexity. It requires a reference to the inode so that the +``i_op->put_link()`` inode operation can be called. In REF-walk, that +reference is kept implicitly through a reference to the dentry, so +keeping the ``struct path`` of the symlink is easiest. For RCU-walk, +the pointer to the inode is kept separately. To allow switching from +RCU-walk back to REF-walk in the middle of processing nested symlinks +we also need the seq number for the dentry so we can confirm that +switching back was safe. + +Finally, when providing a reference to a symlink, the filesystem also +provides an opaque "cookie" that must be passed to ``->put_link()`` so that it +knows what to free. This might be the allocated memory area, or a +pointer to the ``struct page`` in the page cache, or something else +completely. Only the filesystem knows what it is. + +In order for the reference to each symlink to be dropped when the walk completes, +whether in RCU-walk or REF-walk, the symlink stack needs to contain, +along with the path remnants: + +- the ``struct path`` to provide a reference to the inode in REF-walk +- the ``struct inode *`` to provide a reference to the inode in RCU-walk +- the ``seq`` to allow the path to be safely switched from RCU-walk to REF-walk +- the ``cookie`` that tells ``->put_path()`` what to put. + +This means that each entry in the symlink stack needs to hold five +pointers and an integer instead of just one pointer (the path +remnant). On a 64-bit system, this is about 40 bytes per entry; +with 40 entries it adds up to 1600 bytes total, which is less than +half a page. So it might seem like a lot, but is by no means +excessive. + +Note that, in a given stack frame, the path remnant (``name``) is not +part of the symlink that the other fields refer to. It is the remnant +to be followed once that symlink has been fully parsed. + +Following the symlink +--------------------- + +The main loop in ``link_path_walk()`` iterates seamlessly over all +components in the path and all of the non-final symlinks. As symlinks +are processed, the ``name`` pointer is adjusted to point to a new +symlink, or is restored from the stack, so that much of the loop +doesn't need to notice. Getting this ``name`` variable on and off the +stack is very straightforward; pushing and popping the references is +a little more complex. + +When a symlink is found, ``walk_component()`` returns the value ``1`` +(``0`` is returned for any other sort of success, and a negative number +is, as usual, an error indicator). This causes ``get_link()`` to be +called; it then gets the link from the filesystem. Providing that +operation is successful, the old path ``name`` is placed on the stack, +and the new value is used as the ``name`` for a while. When the end of +the path is found (i.e. ``*name`` is ``'\0'``) the old ``name`` is restored +off the stack and path walking continues. + +Pushing and popping the reference pointers (inode, cookie, etc.) is more +complex in part because of the desire to handle tail recursion. When +the last component of a symlink itself points to a symlink, we +want to pop the symlink-just-completed off the stack before pushing +the symlink-just-found to avoid leaving empty path remnants that would +just get in the way. + +It is most convenient to push the new symlink references onto the +stack in ``walk_component()`` immediately when the symlink is found; +``walk_component()`` is also the last piece of code that needs to look at the +old symlink as it walks that last component. So it is quite +convenient for ``walk_component()`` to release the old symlink and pop +the references just before pushing the reference information for the +new symlink. It is guided in this by two flags; ``WALK_GET``, which +gives it permission to follow a symlink if it finds one, and +``WALK_PUT``, which tells it to release the current symlink after it has been +followed. ``WALK_PUT`` is tested first, leading to a call to +``put_link()``. ``WALK_GET`` is tested subsequently (by +``should_follow_link()``) leading to a call to ``pick_link()`` which sets +up the stack frame. + +Symlinks with no final component +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +A pair of special-case symlinks deserve a little further explanation. +Both result in a new ``struct path`` (with mount and dentry) being set +up in the ``nameidata``, and result in ``get_link()`` returning ``NULL``. + +The more obvious case is a symlink to "``/``". All symlinks starting +with "``/``" are detected in ``get_link()`` which resets the ``nameidata`` +to point to the effective filesystem root. If the symlink only +contains "``/``" then there is nothing more to do, no components at all, +so ``NULL`` is returned to indicate that the symlink can be released and +the stack frame discarded. + +The other case involves things in ``/proc`` that look like symlinks but +aren't really:: + + $ ls -l /proc/self/fd/1 + lrwx------ 1 neilb neilb 64 Jun 13 10:19 /proc/self/fd/1 -> /dev/pts/4 + +Every open file descriptor in any process is represented in ``/proc`` by +something that looks like a symlink. It is really a reference to the +target file, not just the name of it. When you ``readlink`` these +objects you get a name that might refer to the same file - unless it +has been unlinked or mounted over. When ``walk_component()`` follows +one of these, the ``->follow_link()`` method in "procfs" doesn't return +a string name, but instead calls ``nd_jump_link()`` which updates the +``nameidata`` in place to point to that target. ``->follow_link()`` then +returns ``NULL``. Again there is no final component and ``get_link()`` +reports this by leaving the ``last_type`` field of ``nameidata`` as +``LAST_BIND``. + +Following the symlink in the final component +-------------------------------------------- + +All this leads to ``link_path_walk()`` walking down every component, and +following all symbolic links it finds, until it reaches the final +component. This is just returned in the ``last`` field of ``nameidata``. +For some callers, this is all they need; they want to create that +``last`` name if it doesn't exist or give an error if it does. Other +callers will want to follow a symlink if one is found, and possibly +apply special handling to the last component of that symlink, rather +than just the last component of the original file name. These callers +potentially need to call ``link_path_walk()`` again and again on +successive symlinks until one is found that doesn't point to another +symlink. + +This case is handled by the relevant caller of ``link_path_walk()``, such as +``path_lookupat()`` using a loop that calls ``link_path_walk()``, and then +handles the final component. If the final component is a symlink +that needs to be followed, then ``trailing_symlink()`` is called to set +things up properly and the loop repeats, calling ``link_path_walk()`` +again. This could loop as many as 40 times if the last component of +each symlink is another symlink. + +The various functions that examine the final component and possibly +report that it is a symlink are ``lookup_last()``, ``mountpoint_last()`` +and ``do_last()``, each of which use the same convention as +``walk_component()`` of returning ``1`` if a symlink was found that needs +to be followed. + +Of these, ``do_last()`` is the most interesting as it is used for +opening a file. Part of ``do_last()`` runs with ``i_rwsem`` held and this +part is in a separate function: ``lookup_open()``. + +Explaining ``do_last()`` completely is beyond the scope of this article, +but a few highlights should help those interested in exploring the +code. + +1. Rather than just finding the target file, ``do_last()`` needs to open + it. If the file was found in the dcache, then ``vfs_open()`` is used for + this. If not, then ``lookup_open()`` will either call ``atomic_open()`` (if + the filesystem provides it) to combine the final lookup with the open, or + will perform the separate ``lookup_real()`` and ``vfs_create()`` steps + directly. In the later case the actual "open" of this newly found or + created file will be performed by ``vfs_open()``, just as if the name + were found in the dcache. + +2. ``vfs_open()`` can fail with ``-EOPENSTALE`` if the cached information + wasn't quite current enough. Rather than restarting the lookup from + the top with ``LOOKUP_REVAL`` set, ``lookup_open()`` is called instead, + giving the filesystem a chance to resolve small inconsistencies. + If that doesn't work, only then is the lookup restarted from the top. + +3. An open with O_CREAT **does** follow a symlink in the final component, + unlike other creation system calls (like ``mkdir``). So the sequence:: + + ln -s bar /tmp/foo + echo hello > /tmp/foo + + will create a file called ``/tmp/bar``. This is not permitted if + ``O_EXCL`` is set but otherwise is handled for an O_CREAT open much + like for a non-creating open: ``should_follow_link()`` returns ``1``, and + so does ``do_last()`` so that ``trailing_symlink()`` gets called and the + open process continues on the symlink that was found. + +Updating the access time +------------------------ + +We previously said of RCU-walk that it would "take no locks, increment +no counts, leave no footprints." We have since seen that some +"footprints" can be needed when handling symlinks as a counted +reference (or even a memory allocation) may be needed. But these +footprints are best kept to a minimum. + +One other place where walking down a symlink can involve leaving +footprints in a way that doesn't affect directories is in updating access times. +In Unix (and Linux) every filesystem object has a "last accessed +time", or "``atime``". Passing through a directory to access a file +within is not considered to be an access for the purposes of +``atime``; only listing the contents of a directory can update its ``atime``. +Symlinks are different it seems. Both reading a symlink (with ``readlink()``) +and looking up a symlink on the way to some other destination can +update the atime on that symlink. + +.. _clearest statement: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/V1_chap04.html#tag_04_08 + +It is not clear why this is the case; POSIX has little to say on the +subject. The `clearest statement`_ is that, if a particular implementation +updates a timestamp in a place not specified by POSIX, this must be +documented "except that any changes caused by pathname resolution need +not be documented". This seems to imply that POSIX doesn't really +care about access-time updates during pathname lookup. + +.. _Linux 1.3.87: https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/history/history.git/diff/fs/ext2/symlink.c?id=f806c6db77b8eaa6e00dcfb6b567706feae8dbb8 + +An examination of history shows that prior to `Linux 1.3.87`_, the ext2 +filesystem, at least, didn't update atime when following a link. +Unfortunately we have no record of why that behavior was changed. + +In any case, access time must now be updated and that operation can be +quite complex. Trying to stay in RCU-walk while doing it is best +avoided. Fortunately it is often permitted to skip the ``atime`` +update. Because ``atime`` updates cause performance problems in various +areas, Linux supports the ``relatime`` mount option, which generally +limits the updates of ``atime`` to once per day on files that aren't +being changed (and symlinks never change once created). Even without +``relatime``, many filesystems record ``atime`` with a one-second +granularity, so only one update per second is required. + +It is easy to test if an ``atime`` update is needed while in RCU-walk +mode and, if it isn't, the update can be skipped and RCU-walk mode +continues. Only when an ``atime`` update is actually required does the +path walk drop down to REF-walk. All of this is handled in the +``get_link()`` function. + +A few flags +----------- + +A suitable way to wrap up this tour of pathname walking is to list +the various flags that can be stored in the ``nameidata`` to guide the +lookup process. Many of these are only meaningful on the final +component, others reflect the current state of the pathname lookup. +And then there is ``LOOKUP_EMPTY``, which doesn't fit conceptually with +the others. If this is not set, an empty pathname causes an error +very early on. If it is set, empty pathnames are not considered to be +an error. + +Global state flags +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +We have already met two global state flags: ``LOOKUP_RCU`` and +``LOOKUP_REVAL``. These select between one of three overall approaches +to lookup: RCU-walk, REF-walk, and REF-walk with forced revalidation. + +``LOOKUP_PARENT`` indicates that the final component hasn't been reached +yet. This is primarily used to tell the audit subsystem the full +context of a particular access being audited. + +``LOOKUP_ROOT`` indicates that the ``root`` field in the ``nameidata`` was +provided by the caller, so it shouldn't be released when it is no +longer needed. + +``LOOKUP_JUMPED`` means that the current dentry was chosen not because +it had the right name but for some other reason. This happens when +following "``..``", following a symlink to ``/``, crossing a mount point +or accessing a "``/proc/$PID/fd/$FD``" symlink. In this case the +filesystem has not been asked to revalidate the name (with +``d_revalidate()``). In such cases the inode may still need to be +revalidated, so ``d_op->d_weak_revalidate()`` is called if +``LOOKUP_JUMPED`` is set when the look completes - which may be at the +final component or, when creating, unlinking, or renaming, at the penultimate component. + +Final-component flags +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +Some of these flags are only set when the final component is being +considered. Others are only checked for when considering that final +component. + +``LOOKUP_AUTOMOUNT`` ensures that, if the final component is an automount +point, then the mount is triggered. Some operations would trigger it +anyway, but operations like ``stat()`` deliberately don't. ``statfs()`` +needs to trigger the mount but otherwise behaves a lot like ``stat()``, so +it sets ``LOOKUP_AUTOMOUNT``, as does "``quotactl()``" and the handling of +"``mount --bind``". + +``LOOKUP_FOLLOW`` has a similar function to ``LOOKUP_AUTOMOUNT`` but for +symlinks. Some system calls set or clear it implicitly, while +others have API flags such as ``AT_SYMLINK_FOLLOW`` and +``UMOUNT_NOFOLLOW`` to control it. Its effect is similar to +``WALK_GET`` that we already met, but it is used in a different way. + +``LOOKUP_DIRECTORY`` insists that the final component is a directory. +Various callers set this and it is also set when the final component +is found to be followed by a slash. + +Finally ``LOOKUP_OPEN``, ``LOOKUP_CREATE``, ``LOOKUP_EXCL``, and +``LOOKUP_RENAME_TARGET`` are not used directly by the VFS but are made +available to the filesystem and particularly the ``->d_revalidate()`` +method. A filesystem can choose not to bother revalidating too hard +if it knows that it will be asked to open or create the file soon. +These flags were previously useful for ``->lookup()`` too but with the +introduction of ``->atomic_open()`` they are less relevant there. + +End of the road +--------------- + +Despite its complexity, all this pathname lookup code appears to be +in good shape - various parts are certainly easier to understand now +than even a couple of releases ago. But that doesn't mean it is +"finished". As already mentioned, RCU-walk currently only follows +symlinks that are stored in the inode so, while it handles many ext4 +symlinks, it doesn't help with NFS, XFS, or Btrfs. That support +is not likely to be long delayed. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt @@ -125,6 +125,13 @@ process running on the system, which is named after the process ID (PID). The link self points to the process reading the file system. Each process subdirectory has the entries listed in Table 1-1. +Note that an open a file descriptor to /proc/<pid> or to any of its +contained files or subdirectories does not prevent <pid> being reused +for some other process in the event that <pid> exits. Operations on +open /proc/<pid> file descriptors corresponding to dead processes +never act on any new process that the kernel may, through chance, have +also assigned the process ID <pid>. Instead, operations on these FDs +usually fail with ESRCH. Table 1-1: Process specific entries in /proc .............................................................................. @@ -194,8 +201,10 @@ read the file /proc/PID/status: CapPrm: 0000000000000000 CapEff: 0000000000000000 CapBnd: ffffffffffffffff + CapAmb: 0000000000000000 NoNewPrivs: 0 Seccomp: 0 + Speculation_Store_Bypass: thread vulnerable voluntary_ctxt_switches: 0 nonvoluntary_ctxt_switches: 1 @@ -215,7 +224,7 @@ asynchronous manner and the value may not be very precise. To see a precise snapshot of a moment, you can see /proc/<pid>/smaps file and scan page table. It's slow but very precise. -Table 1-2: Contents of the status files (as of 4.8) +Table 1-2: Contents of the status files (as of 4.19) .............................................................................. Field Content Name filename of the executable @@ -270,8 +279,10 @@ Table 1-2: Contents of the status files (as of 4.8) CapPrm bitmap of permitted capabilities CapEff bitmap of effective capabilities CapBnd bitmap of capabilities bounding set + CapAmb bitmap of ambient capabilities NoNewPrivs no_new_privs, like prctl(PR_GET_NO_NEW_PRIV, ...) Seccomp seccomp mode, like prctl(PR_GET_SECCOMP, ...) + Speculation_Store_Bypass speculative store bypass mitigation status Cpus_allowed mask of CPUs on which this process may run Cpus_allowed_list Same as previous, but in "list format" Mems_allowed mask of memory nodes allowed to this process diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/qnx6.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/qnx6.txt @@ -87,7 +87,7 @@ addressed with 16 direct blocks. For more than 16 blocks an indirect addressing in form of another tree is used. (scheme is the same as the one used for the superblock root nodes) -The filesize is stored 64bit. Inode counting starts with 1. (whilst long +The filesize is stored 64bit. Inode counting starts with 1. (while long filename inodes start with 0) Directories @@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ Then userspace. The requirement for a static, fixed preallocated system area comes from how qnx6fs deals with writes. Each superblock got it's own half of the system area. So superblock #1 -always uses blocks from the lower half whilst superblock #2 just writes to +always uses blocks from the lower half while superblock #2 just writes to blocks represented by the upper half bitmap system area bits. Bitmap blocks, Inode blocks and indirect addressing blocks for those two diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/spufs.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/spufs.txt @@ -452,7 +452,7 @@ RETURN VALUE ERRORS - EACCESS + EACCES The current user does not have write access on the spufs mount point. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/vfs.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/vfs.txt @@ -1131,7 +1131,7 @@ struct dentry_operations { d_manage: called to allow the filesystem to manage the transition from a dentry (optional). This allows autofs, for example, to hold up clients - waiting to explore behind a 'mountpoint' whilst letting the daemon go + waiting to explore behind a 'mountpoint' while letting the daemon go past and construct the subtree there. 0 should be returned to let the calling process continue. -EISDIR can be returned to tell pathwalk to use this directory as an ordinary directory and to ignore anything diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/xfs-self-describing-metadata.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/xfs-self-describing-metadata.txt @@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ owner field in the metadata object, we can immediately do top down validation to determine the scope of the problem. Different types of metadata have different owner identifiers. For example, -directory, attribute and extent tree blocks are all owned by an inode, whilst +directory, attribute and extent tree blocks are all owned by an inode, while freespace btree blocks are owned by an allocation group. Hence the size and contents of the owner field are determined by the type of metadata object we are looking at. The owner information can also identify misplaced writes (e.g. diff --git a/Documentation/filesystems/xfs.txt b/Documentation/filesystems/xfs.txt @@ -417,7 +417,7 @@ level directory: filesystem from ever unmounting fully in the case of "retry forever" handler configurations. - Note: there is no guarantee that fail_at_unmount can be set whilst an + Note: there is no guarantee that fail_at_unmount can be set while an unmount is in progress. It is possible that the sysfs entries are removed by the unmounting filesystem before a "retry forever" error handler configuration causes unmount to hang, and hence the filesystem diff --git a/Documentation/gpu/drm-uapi.rst b/Documentation/gpu/drm-uapi.rst @@ -190,11 +190,11 @@ ENOSPC: Simply running out of kernel/system memory is signalled through ENOMEM. -EPERM/EACCESS: +EPERM/EACCES: Returned for an operation that is valid, but needs more privileges. E.g. root-only or much more common, DRM master-only operations return this when when called by unpriviledged clients. There's no clear - difference between EACCESS and EPERM. + difference between EACCES and EPERM. ENODEV: The device is not (yet) present or fully initialized. diff --git a/Documentation/leds/leds-class.txt b/Documentation/leds/leds-class.txt @@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ existing subsystems with minimal additional code. Examples are the disk-activity nand-disk and sharpsl-charge triggers. With led triggers disabled, the code optimises away. -Complex triggers whilst available to all LEDs have LED specific +Complex triggers while available to all LEDs have LED specific parameters and work on a per LED basis. The timer trigger is an example. The timer trigger will periodically change the LED brightness between LED_OFF and the current brightness setting. The "on" and "off" time can diff --git a/Documentation/media/uapi/v4l/extended-controls.rst b/Documentation/media/uapi/v4l/extended-controls.rst @@ -4003,7 +4003,7 @@ demodulator. It receives radio frequency (RF) from the antenna and converts that received signal to lower intermediate frequency (IF) or baseband frequency (BB). Tuners that could do baseband output are often called Zero-IF tuners. Older tuners were typically simple PLL tuners -inside a metal box, whilst newer ones are highly integrated chips +inside a metal box, while newer ones are highly integrated chips without a metal box "silicon tuners". These controls are mostly applicable for new feature rich silicon tuners, just because older tuners does not have much adjustable features. diff --git a/Documentation/memory-barriers.txt b/Documentation/memory-barriers.txt @@ -587,7 +587,7 @@ leading to the following situation: (Q == &B) and (D == 2) ???? -Whilst this may seem like a failure of coherency or causality maintenance, it +While this may seem like a failure of coherency or causality maintenance, it isn't, and this behaviour can be observed on certain real CPUs (such as the DEC Alpha). @@ -2008,7 +2008,7 @@ for each construct. These operations all imply certain barriers: Certain locking variants of the ACQUIRE operation may fail, either due to being unable to get the lock immediately, or due to receiving an unblocked - signal whilst asleep waiting for the lock to become available. Failed + signal while asleep waiting for the lock to become available. Failed locks do not imply any sort of barrier. [!] Note: one of the consequences of lock ACQUIREs and RELEASEs being only @@ -2508,7 +2508,7 @@ CPU, that CPU's dependency ordering logic will take care of everything else. ATOMIC OPERATIONS ----------------- -Whilst they are technically interprocessor interaction considerations, atomic +While they are technically interprocessor interaction considerations, atomic operations are noted specially as some of them imply full memory barriers and some don't, but they're very heavily relied on as a group throughout the kernel. @@ -2531,7 +2531,7 @@ the device to malfunction. Inside of the Linux kernel, I/O should be done through the appropriate accessor routines - such as inb() or writel() - which know how to make such accesses -appropriately sequential. Whilst this, for the most part, renders the explicit +appropriately sequential. While this, for the most part, renders the explicit use of memory barriers unnecessary, there are a couple of situations where they might be needed: @@ -2555,7 +2555,7 @@ access the device. This may be alleviated - at least in part - by disabling local interrupts (a form of locking), such that the critical operations are all contained within -the interrupt-disabled section in the driver. Whilst the driver's interrupt +the interrupt-disabled section in the driver. While the driver's interrupt routine is executing, the driver's core may not run on the same CPU, and its interrupt is not permitted to happen again until the current interrupt has been handled, thus the interrupt handler does not need to lock against that. @@ -2763,7 +2763,7 @@ CACHE COHERENCY Life isn't quite as simple as it may appear above, however: for while the caches are expected to be coherent, there's no guarantee that that coherency -will be ordered. This means that whilst changes made on one CPU will +will be ordered. This means that while changes made on one CPU will eventually become visible on all CPUs, there's no guarantee that they will become apparent in the same order on those other CPUs. @@ -2799,7 +2799,7 @@ Imagine the system has the following properties: (*) an even-numbered cache line may be in cache B, cache D or it may still be resident in memory; - (*) whilst the CPU core is interrogating one cache, the other cache may be + (*) while the CPU core is interrogating one cache, the other cache may be making use of the bus to access the rest of the system - perhaps to displace a dirty cacheline or to do a speculative load; @@ -2835,7 +2835,7 @@ now imagine that the second CPU wants to read those values: x = *q; The above pair of reads may then fail to happen in the expected order, as the -cacheline holding p may get updated in one of the second CPU's caches whilst +cacheline holding p may get updated in one of the second CPU's caches while the update to the cacheline holding v is delayed in the other of the second CPU's caches by some other cache event: @@ -2855,7 +2855,7 @@ CPU's caches by some other cache event: <C:unbusy> <C:commit v=2> -Basically, whilst both cachelines will be updated on CPU 2 eventually, there's +Basically, while both cachelines will be updated on CPU 2 eventually, there's no guarantee that, without intervention, the order of update will be the same as that committed on CPU 1. @@ -2885,7 +2885,7 @@ coherency queue before processing any further requests: This sort of problem can be encountered on DEC Alpha processors as they have a split cache that improves performance by making better use of the data bus. -Whilst most CPUs do imply a data dependency barrier on the read when a memory +While most CPUs do imply a data dependency barrier on the read when a memory access depends on a read, not all do, so it may not be relied on. Other CPUs may also have split caches, but must coordinate between the various @@ -2974,7 +2974,7 @@ assumption doesn't hold because: thus cutting down on transaction setup costs (memory and PCI devices may both be able to do this); and - (*) the CPU's data cache may affect the ordering, and whilst cache-coherency + (*) the CPU's data cache may affect the ordering, and while cache-coherency mechanisms may alleviate this - once the store has actually hit the cache - there's no guarantee that the coherency management will be propagated in order to other CPUs. diff --git a/Documentation/networking/device_drivers/dec/de4x5.txt b/Documentation/networking/device_drivers/dec/de4x5.txt @@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ Automedia detection is included so that in principle you can disconnect from, e.g. TP, reconnect to BNC and things will still work (after a - pause whilst the driver figures out where its media went). My tests + pause while the driver figures out where its media went). My tests using ping showed that it appears to work.... By default, the driver will now autodetect any DECchip based card. diff --git a/Documentation/networking/rxrpc.txt b/Documentation/networking/rxrpc.txt @@ -661,7 +661,7 @@ A server would be set up to accept operations in the following manner: setsockopt(server, SOL_RXRPC, RXRPC_SECURITY_KEYRING, "AFSkeys", 7); The keyring can be manipulated after it has been given to the socket. This - permits the server to add more keys, replace keys, etc. whilst it is live. + permits the server to add more keys, replace keys, etc. while it is live. (3) A local address must then be bound: @@ -1032,7 +1032,7 @@ The kernel interface functions are as follows: struct sockaddr_rxrpc *srx, struct key *key); - This attempts to partially reinitialise a call and submit it again whilst + This attempts to partially reinitialise a call and submit it again while reusing the original call's Tx queue to avoid the need to repackage and re-encrypt the data to be sent. call indicates the call to retry, srx the new address to send it to and key the encryption key to use for signing or @@ -1066,7 +1066,7 @@ The kernel interface functions are as follows: alive after waiting for a suitable interval. This allows the caller to work out if the server is still contactable and - if the call is still alive on the server whilst waiting for the server to + if the call is still alive on the server while waiting for the server to process a client operation. The second function causes a ping ACK to be transmitted to try to provoke @@ -1149,14 +1149,14 @@ adjusted through sysctls in /proc/net/rxrpc/: (*) connection_expiry The amount of time in seconds after a connection was last used before we - remove it from the connection list. Whilst a connection is in existence, + remove it from the connection list. While a connection is in existence, it serves as a placeholder for negotiated security; when it is deleted, the security must be renegotiated. (*) transport_expiry The amount of time in seconds after a transport was last used before we - remove it from the transport list. Whilst a transport is in existence, it + remove it from the transport list. While a transport is in existence, it serves to anchor the peer data and keeps the connection ID counter. (*) rxrpc_rx_window_size diff --git a/Documentation/power/regulator/overview.txt b/Documentation/power/regulator/overview.txt @@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Nomenclature Some terms used in this document:- o Regulator - Electronic device that supplies power to other devices. - Most regulators can enable and disable their output whilst + Most regulators can enable and disable their output while some can control their output voltage and or current. Input Voltage -> Regulator -> Output Voltage diff --git a/Documentation/process/1.Intro.rst b/Documentation/process/1.Intro.rst @@ -1,3 +1,5 @@ +.. _development_process_intro: + Introduction ============ diff --git a/Documentation/process/4.Coding.rst b/Documentation/process/4.Coding.rst @@ -315,7 +315,8 @@ variety of potential coding problems; it can also propose fixes for those problems. Quite a few "semantic patches" for the kernel have been packaged under the scripts/coccinelle directory; running "make coccicheck" will run through those semantic patches and report on any problems found. See -Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst for more information. +:ref:`Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst <devtools_coccinelle>` +for more information. Other kinds of portability errors are best found by compiling your code for other architectures. If you do not happen to have an S/390 system or a diff --git a/Documentation/process/5.Posting.rst b/Documentation/process/5.Posting.rst @@ -9,9 +9,10 @@ kernel. Unsurprisingly, the kernel development community has evolved a set of conventions and procedures which are used in the posting of patches; following them will make life much easier for everybody involved. This document will attempt to cover these expectations in reasonable detail; -more information can also be found in the files process/submitting-patches.rst, -process/submitting-drivers.rst, and process/submit-checklist.rst in the kernel -documentation directory. +more information can also be found in the files +:ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>`, +:ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst <submittingdrivers>` +and :ref:`Documentation/process/submit-checklist.rst <submitchecklist>`. When to post @@ -198,8 +199,10 @@ pass it to diff with the "-X" option. The tags mentioned above are used to describe how various developers have been associated with the development of this patch. They are described in -detail in the process/submitting-patches.rst document; what follows here is a -brief summary. Each of these lines has the format: +detail in +the :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>` +document; what follows here is a brief summary. Each of these lines has +the format: :: @@ -210,8 +213,8 @@ The tags in common use are: - Signed-off-by: this is a developer's certification that he or she has the right to submit the patch for inclusion into the kernel. It is an agreement to the Developer's Certificate of Origin, the full text of - which can be found in Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst. Code - without a proper signoff cannot be merged into the mainline. + which can be found in :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>` + Code without a proper signoff cannot be merged into the mainline. - Co-developed-by: states that the patch was also created by another developer along with the original author. This is useful at times when multiple @@ -226,7 +229,7 @@ The tags in common use are: it to work. - Reviewed-by: the named developer has reviewed the patch for correctness; - see the reviewer's statement in Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst + see the reviewer's statement in :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>` for more detail. - Reported-by: names a user who reported a problem which is fixed by this @@ -253,8 +256,8 @@ take care of: be examined in any detail. If there is any doubt at all, mail the patch to yourself and convince yourself that it shows up intact. - Documentation/process/email-clients.rst has some helpful hints on making - specific mail clients work for sending patches. + :ref:`Documentation/process/email-clients.rst <email_clients>` has some + helpful hints on making specific mail clients work for sending patches. - Are you sure your patch is free of silly mistakes? You should always run patches through scripts/checkpatch.pl and address the complaints it diff --git a/Documentation/process/8.Conclusion.rst b/Documentation/process/8.Conclusion.rst @@ -5,9 +5,10 @@ For more information There are numerous sources of information on Linux kernel development and related topics. First among those will always be the Documentation -directory found in the kernel source distribution. The top-level process/howto.rst -file is an important starting point; process/submitting-patches.rst and -process/submitting-drivers.rst are also something which all kernel developers should +directory found in the kernel source distribution. The top-level :ref:`process/howto.rst <process_howto>` +file is an important starting point; :ref:`process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>` +and :ref:`process/submitting-drivers.rst <submittingdrivers>` +are also something which all kernel developers should read. Many internal kernel APIs are documented using the kerneldoc mechanism; "make htmldocs" or "make pdfdocs" can be used to generate those documents in HTML or PDF format (though the version of TeX shipped by some diff --git a/Documentation/process/adding-syscalls.rst b/Documentation/process/adding-syscalls.rst @@ -1,3 +1,6 @@ + +.. _addsyscalls: + Adding a New System Call ======================== diff --git a/Documentation/process/changes.rst b/Documentation/process/changes.rst @@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ Kernel documentation Sphinx ------ -Please see :ref:`sphinx_install` in ``Documentation/doc-guide/sphinx.rst`` +Please see :ref:`sphinx_install` in :ref:`Documentation/doc-guide/sphinx.rst <sphinxdoc>` for details about Sphinx requirements. Getting updated software diff --git a/Documentation/process/coding-style.rst b/Documentation/process/coding-style.rst @@ -1075,5 +1075,5 @@ gcc internals and indent, all available from http://www.gnu.org/manual/ WG14 is the international standardization working group for the programming language C, URL: http://www.open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG14/ -Kernel process/coding-style.rst, by greg@kroah.com at OLS 2002: +Kernel :ref:`process/coding-style.rst <codingstyle>`, by greg@kroah.com at OLS 2002: http://www.kroah.com/linux/talks/ols_2002_kernel_codingstyle_talk/html/ diff --git a/Documentation/process/howto.rst b/Documentation/process/howto.rst @@ -1,3 +1,5 @@ +.. _process_howto: + HOWTO do Linux kernel development ================================= @@ -296,9 +298,9 @@ two weeks, but it can be longer if there are no pressing problems. A security-related problem, instead, can cause a release to happen almost instantly. -The file Documentation/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst in the kernel tree -documents what kinds of changes are acceptable for the -stable tree, and -how the release process works. +The file :ref:`Documentation/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst <stable_kernel_rules>` +in the kernel tree documents what kinds of changes are acceptable for +the -stable tree, and how the release process works. 4.x -git patches ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ @@ -358,7 +360,8 @@ tool. For details on how to use the kernel bugzilla, please see: https://bugzilla.kernel.org/page.cgi?id=faq.html -The file admin-guide/reporting-bugs.rst in the main kernel source directory has a good +The file :ref:`admin-guide/reporting-bugs.rst <reportingbugs>` +in the main kernel source directory has a good template for how to report a possible kernel bug, and details what kind of information is needed by the kernel developers to help track down the problem. @@ -424,7 +427,7 @@ add your statements between the individual quoted sections instead of writing at the top of the mail. If you add patches to your mail, make sure they are plain readable text -as stated in Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst. +as stated in :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>`. Kernel developers don't want to deal with attachments or compressed patches; they may want to comment on individual lines of your patch, which works only that way. Make sure you diff --git a/Documentation/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst b/Documentation/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst @@ -1,3 +1,5 @@ +.. _process_statement_driver: + Kernel Driver Statement ----------------------- diff --git a/Documentation/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst b/Documentation/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst @@ -1,4 +1,6 @@ -Linux Kernel Enforcement Statement +.. _process_statement_kernel: + +Linux Kernel Enforcement Statement ---------------------------------- As developers of the Linux kernel, we have a keen interest in how our software diff --git a/Documentation/process/magic-number.rst b/Documentation/process/magic-number.rst @@ -1,3 +1,5 @@ +.. _magicnumbers: + Linux magic numbers =================== diff --git a/Documentation/process/management-style.rst b/Documentation/process/management-style.rst @@ -5,8 +5,9 @@ Linux kernel management style This is a short document describing the preferred (or made up, depending on who you ask) management style for the linux kernel. It's meant to -mirror the process/coding-style.rst document to some degree, and mainly written to -avoid answering [#f1]_ the same (or similar) questions over and over again. +mirror the :ref:`process/coding-style.rst <codingstyle>` document to some +degree, and mainly written to avoid answering [#f1]_ the same (or similar) +questions over and over again. Management style is very personal and much harder to quantify than simple coding style rules, so this document may or may not have anything diff --git a/Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst b/Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst @@ -16,7 +16,8 @@ you should probably talk to XFree86 (http://www.xfree86.org/) and/or X.Org Oh, and we don't really recommend submitting changes to XFree86 :) -Also read the Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst document. +Also read the :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>` +document. Allocating Device Numbers @@ -27,7 +28,8 @@ by the Linux assigned name and number authority (currently this is Torben Mathiasen). The site is http://www.lanana.org/. This also deals with allocating numbers for devices that are not going to be submitted to the mainstream kernel. -See Documentation/admin-guide/devices.rst for more information on this. +See :ref:`Documentation/admin-guide/devices.rst <admin_devices>` +for more information on this. If you don't use assigned numbers then when your device is submitted it will be given an assigned number even if that is different from values you may @@ -117,7 +119,7 @@ PM support: anything. For the driver testing instructions see Documentation/power/drivers-testing.txt and for a relatively complete overview of the power management issues related to - drivers see Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst. + drivers see :ref:`Documentation/driver-api/pm/devices.rst <driverapi_pm_devices>`. Control: In general if there is active maintenance of a driver by diff --git a/Documentation/s390/3270.ChangeLog b/Documentation/s390/3270.ChangeLog @@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Sep 2002: Dynamically get 3270 input buffer Sep 2002: Fix tubfs kmalloc()s * Do read and write lengths correctly in fs3270_read() - and fs3270_write(), whilst never asking kmalloc() + and fs3270_write(), while never asking kmalloc() for more than 0x800 bytes. Affects tubfs.c and tubio.h. Sep 2002: Recognize 3270 control unit type 3174 diff --git a/Documentation/security/credentials.rst b/Documentation/security/credentials.rst @@ -291,7 +291,7 @@ for example), it must be considered immutable, barring two exceptions: 1. The reference count may be altered. - 2. Whilst the keyring subscriptions of a set of credentials may not be + 2. While the keyring subscriptions of a set of credentials may not be changed, the keyrings subscribed to may have their contents altered. To catch accidental credential alteration at compile time, struct task_struct @@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ Once a reference has been obtained, it must be released with ``put_cred()``, Accessing Another Task's Credentials ------------------------------------ -Whilst a task may access its own credentials without the need for locking, the +While a task may access its own credentials without the need for locking, the same is not true of a task wanting to access another task's credentials. It must use the RCU read lock and ``rcu_dereference()``. @@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ This should be used inside the RCU read lock, as in the following example:: } Should it be necessary to hold another task's credentials for a long period of -time, and possibly to sleep whilst doing so, then the caller should get a +time, and possibly to sleep while doing so, then the caller should get a reference on them using:: const struct cred *get_task_cred(struct task_struct *task); @@ -442,7 +442,7 @@ duplicate of the current process's credentials, returning with the mutex still held if successful. It returns NULL if not successful (out of memory). The mutex prevents ``ptrace()`` from altering the ptrace state of a process -whilst security checks on credentials construction and changing is taking place +while security checks on credentials construction and changing is taking place as the ptrace state may alter the outcome, particularly in the case of ``execve()``. diff --git a/Documentation/security/keys/request-key.rst b/Documentation/security/keys/request-key.rst @@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ Negative Instantiation And Rejection Rather than instantiating a key, it is possible for the possessor of an authorisation key to negatively instantiate a key that's under construction. This is a short duration placeholder that causes any attempt at re-requesting -the key whilst it exists to fail with error ENOKEY if negated or the specified +the key while it exists to fail with error ENOKEY if negated or the specified error if rejected. This is provided to prevent excessive repeated spawning of /sbin/request-key diff --git a/Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt b/Documentation/serial/serial-rs485.txt @@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ /* Set rts delay after send, if needed: */ rs485conf.delay_rts_after_send = ...; - /* Set this flag if you want to receive data even whilst sending data */ + /* Set this flag if you want to receive data even while sending data */ rs485conf.flags |= SER_RS485_RX_DURING_TX; if (ioctl (fd, TIOCSRS485, &rs485conf) < 0) { diff --git a/Documentation/sound/soc/dai.rst b/Documentation/sound/soc/dai.rst @@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ I2S === I2S is a common 4 wire DAI used in HiFi, STB and portable devices. The Tx and -Rx lines are used for audio transmission, whilst the bit clock (BCLK) and +Rx lines are used for audio transmission, while the bit clock (BCLK) and left/right clock (LRC) synchronise the link. I2S is flexible in that either the controller or CODEC can drive (master) the BCLK and LRC clock lines. Bit clock usually varies depending on the sample rate and the master system clock @@ -49,9 +49,9 @@ PCM PCM is another 4 wire interface, very similar to I2S, which can support a more flexible protocol. It has bit clock (BCLK) and sync (SYNC) lines that are used -to synchronise the link whilst the Tx and Rx lines are used to transmit and +to synchronise the link while the Tx and Rx lines are used to transmit and receive the audio data. Bit clock usually varies depending on sample rate -whilst sync runs at the sample rate. PCM also supports Time Division +while sync runs at the sample rate. PCM also supports Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) in that several devices can use the bus simultaneously (this is sometimes referred to as network mode). diff --git a/Documentation/sound/soc/dpcm.rst b/Documentation/sound/soc/dpcm.rst @@ -218,7 +218,7 @@ like a BT phone call :- * * <----DAI5-----> FM ************* -This allows the host CPU to sleep whilst the DSP, MODEM DAI and the BT DAI are +This allows the host CPU to sleep while the DSP, MODEM DAI and the BT DAI are still in operation. A BE DAI link can also set the codec to a dummy device if the code is a device diff --git a/Documentation/static-keys.txt b/Documentation/static-keys.txt @@ -156,7 +156,7 @@ or increment/decrement function. Note that switching branches results in some locks being taken, particularly the CPU hotplug lock (in order to avoid races against -CPUs being brought in the kernel whilst the kernel is getting +CPUs being brought in the kernel while the kernel is getting patched). Calling the static key API from within a hotplug notifier is thus a sure deadlock recipe. In order to still allow use of the functionnality, the following functions are provided: diff --git a/Documentation/thermal/power_allocator.txt b/Documentation/thermal/power_allocator.txt @@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ the permitted thermal "ramp" of the system. For instance, a lower `k_pu` value will provide a slower ramp, at the cost of capping available capacity at a low temperature. On the other hand, a high value of `k_pu` will result in the governor granting very high power -whilst temperature is low, and may lead to temperature overshooting. +while temperature is low, and may lead to temperature overshooting. The default value for `k_pu` is: diff --git a/Documentation/trace/ftrace.rst b/Documentation/trace/ftrace.rst @@ -24,13 +24,13 @@ It can be used for debugging or analyzing latencies and performance issues that take place outside of user-space. Although ftrace is typically considered the function tracer, it -is really a frame work of several assorted tracing utilities. +is really a framework of several assorted tracing utilities. There's latency tracing to examine what occurs between interrupts disabled and enabled, as well as for preemption and from a time a task is woken to the task is actually scheduled in. One of the most common uses of ftrace is the event tracing. -Through out the kernel is hundreds of static event points that +Throughout the kernel is hundreds of static event points that can be enabled via the tracefs file system to see what is going on in certain parts of the kernel. @@ -462,7 +462,7 @@ of ftrace. Here is a list of some of the key files: mono_raw: This is the raw monotonic clock (CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW) - which is montonic but is not subject to any rate adjustments + which is monotonic but is not subject to any rate adjustments and ticks at the same rate as the hardware clocksource. boot: @@ -914,8 +914,8 @@ The above is mostly meaningful for kernel developers. current trace and the next trace. - '$' - greater than 1 second - - '@' - greater than 100 milisecond - - '*' - greater than 10 milisecond + - '@' - greater than 100 millisecond + - '*' - greater than 10 millisecond - '#' - greater than 1000 microsecond - '!' - greater than 100 microsecond - '+' - greater than 10 microsecond @@ -2541,7 +2541,7 @@ At compile time every C file object is run through the recordmcount program (located in the scripts directory). This program will parse the ELF headers in the C object to find all the locations in the .text section that call mcount. Starting -with gcc verson 4.6, the -mfentry has been added for x86, which +with gcc version 4.6, the -mfentry has been added for x86, which calls "__fentry__" instead of "mcount". Which is called before the creation of the stack frame. @@ -2978,7 +2978,7 @@ The following commands are supported: When the function is hit, it will dump the contents of the ftrace ring buffer to the console. This is useful if you need to debug something, and want to dump the trace when a certain function - is hit. Perhaps its a function that is called before a tripple + is hit. Perhaps it's a function that is called before a triple fault happens and does not allow you to get a regular dump. - cpudump: diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/README.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/README.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/admin-guide/README.rst <readme>` + +.. _it_readme: + +Rilascio del kernel Linux 4.x <http://kernel.org/> +=================================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst <securitybugs>` + +.. _it_securitybugs: + +Bachi di sicurezza +================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/doc-guide/kernel-doc.rst @@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ macro simil-funzioni è il seguente:: * Context: Describes whether the function can sleep, what locks it takes, * releases, or expects to be held. It can extend over multiple * lines. - * Return: Describe the return value of foobar. + * Return: Describe the return value of function_name. * * The return value description can also have multiple paragraphs, and should * be placed at the end of the comment block. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/index.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/index.rst @@ -86,6 +86,7 @@ vostre modifiche molto più semplice .. toctree:: :maxdepth: 2 + process/index doc-guide/index kernel-hacking/index diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/kernel-hacking/locking.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/kernel-hacking/locking.rst @@ -593,8 +593,8 @@ l'opzione ``GFP_KERNEL`` che è permessa solo in contesto utente. Ho supposto che :c:func:`cache_add()` venga chiamata dal contesto utente, altrimenti questa opzione deve diventare un parametro di :c:func:`cache_add()`. -Exposing Objects Outside This File ----------------------------------- +Esporre gli oggetti al di fuori del file +---------------------------------------- Se i vostri oggetti contengono più informazioni, potrebbe non essere sufficiente copiare i dati avanti e indietro: per esempio, altre parti del diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/1.Intro.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/1.Intro.rst @@ -0,0 +1,297 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/1.Intro.rst <development_process_intro>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_intro: + +Introduzione +============ + +Riepilogo generale +------------------ + +Il resto di questa sezione riguarda il processo di sviluppo del kernel e +quella sorta di frustrazione che gli sviluppatori e i loro datori di lavoro +potrebbero dover affrontare. Ci sono molte ragioni per le quali del codice +per il kernel debba essere incorporato nel kernel ufficiale, fra le quali: +disponibilità immediata agli utilizzatori, supporto della comunità in +differenti modalità, e la capacità di influenzare la direzione dello sviluppo +del kernel. +Il codice che contribuisce al kernel Linux deve essere reso disponibile sotto +una licenza GPL-compatibile. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_process` introduce il processo di sviluppo, +il ciclo di rilascio del kernel, ed i meccanismi della finestra +d'incorporazione. Il capitolo copre le varie fasi di una modifica: sviluppo, +revisione e ciclo d'incorporazione. Ci sono alcuni dibattiti su strumenti e +liste di discussione. Gli sviluppatori che sono in attesa di poter sviluppare +qualcosa per il kernel sono invitati ad individuare e sistemare bachi come +esercizio iniziale. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_early_stage` copre i primi stadi della +pianificazione di un progetto di sviluppo, con particolare enfasi sul +coinvolgimento della comunità, il prima possibile. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_coding` riguarda il processo di scrittura +del codice. Qui, sono esposte le diverse insidie che sono state già affrontate +da altri sviluppatori. Il capitolo copre anche alcuni dei requisiti per le +modifiche, ed esiste un'introduzione ad alcuni strumenti che possono aiutarvi +nell'assicurarvi che le modifiche per il kernel siano corrette. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_posting` parla del processo di pubblicazione +delle modifiche per la revisione. Per essere prese in considerazione dalla +comunità di sviluppo, le modifiche devono essere propriamente formattate ed +esposte, e devono essere inviate nel posto giusto. Seguire i consigli presenti +in questa sezione dovrebbe essere d'aiuto nell'assicurare la migliore +accoglienza possibile del vostro lavoro. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_followthrough` copre ciò che accade dopo +la pubblicazione delle modifiche; a questo punto il lavoro è lontano +dall'essere concluso. Lavorare con i revisori è una parte cruciale del +processo di sviluppo; questa sezione offre una serie di consigli su come +evitare problemi in questa importante fase. Gli sviluppatori sono diffidenti +nell'affermare che il lavoro è concluso quando una modifica è incorporata nei +sorgenti principali. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_advancedtopics` introduce un paio di argomenti +"avanzati": gestire le modifiche con git e controllare le modifiche pubblicate +da altri. + +La sezione :ref:`it_development_conclusion` chiude il documento con dei +riferimenti ad altre fonti che forniscono ulteriori informazioni sullo sviluppo +del kernel. + +Di cosa parla questo documento +------------------------------ + +Il kernel Linux, ha oltre 8 milioni di linee di codice e ben oltre 1000 +contributori ad ogni rilascio; è uno dei più vasti e più attivi software +liberi progettati mai esistiti. Sin dal sul modesto inizio nel 1991, +questo kernel si è evoluto nel miglior componente per sistemi operativi +che fanno funzionare piccoli riproduttori musicali, PC, grandi super computer +e tutte le altre tipologie di sistemi fra questi estremi. È una soluzione +robusta, efficiente ed adattabile a praticamente qualsiasi situazione. + +Con la crescita di Linux è arrivato anche un aumento di sviluppatori +(ed aziende) desiderosi di partecipare a questo sviluppo. I produttori di +hardware vogliono assicurarsi che il loro prodotti siano supportati da Linux, +rendendo questi prodotti attrattivi agli utenti Linux. I produttori di +sistemi integrati, che usano Linux come componente di un prodotto integrato, +vogliono che Linux sia capace ed adeguato agli obiettivi ed il più possibile +alla mano. Fornitori ed altri produttori di software che basano i propri +prodotti su Linux hanno un chiaro interesse verso capacità, prestazioni ed +affidabilità del kernel Linux. E gli utenti finali, anche, spesso vorrebbero +cambiare Linux per renderlo più aderente alle proprie necessità. + +Una delle caratteristiche più coinvolgenti di Linux è quella dell'accessibilità +per gli sviluppatori; chiunque con le capacità richieste può migliorare +Linux ed influenzarne la direzione di sviluppo. Prodotti non open-source non +possono offrire questo tipo di apertura, che è una caratteristica del software +libero. Ma, anzi, il kernel è persino più aperto rispetto a molti altri +progetti di software libero. Un classico ciclo di sviluppo trimestrale può +coinvolgere 1000 sviluppatori che lavorano per più di 100 differenti aziende +(o per nessuna azienda). + +Lavorare con la comunità di sviluppo del kernel non è particolarmente +difficile. Ma, ciononostante, diversi potenziali contributori hanno trovato +delle difficoltà quando hanno cercato di lavorare sul kernel. La comunità del +kernel utilizza un proprio modo di operare che gli permette di funzionare +agevolmente (e genera un prodotto di alta qualità) in un ambiente dove migliaia +di stringhe di codice sono modificate ogni giorni. Quindi non deve sorprendere +che il processo di sviluppo del kernel differisca notevolmente dai metodi di +sviluppo privati. + +Il processo di sviluppo del Kernel può, dall'altro lato, risultare +intimidatorio e strano ai nuovi sviluppatori, ma ha dietro di se buone ragioni +e solide esperienze. Uno sviluppatore che non comprende i modi della comunità +del kernel (o, peggio, che cerchi di aggirarli o violarli) avrà un'esperienza +deludente nel proprio bagaglio. La comunità di sviluppo, sebbene sia utile +a coloro che cercano di imparare, ha poco tempo da dedicare a coloro che non +ascoltano o coloro che non sono interessati al processo di sviluppo. + +Si spera che coloro che leggono questo documento saranno in grado di evitare +queste esperienze spiacevoli. C'è molto materiale qui, ma lo sforzo della +lettura sarà ripagato in breve tempo. La comunità di sviluppo ha sempre +bisogno di sviluppatori che vogliano aiutare a rendere il kernel migliore; +il testo seguente potrebbe esservi d'aiuto - o essere d'aiuto ai vostri +collaboratori- per entrare a far parte della nostra comunità. + +Crediti +------- + +Questo documento è stato scritto da Jonathan Corbet, corbet@lwn.net. +È stato migliorato da Johannes Berg, James Berry, Alex Chiang, Roland +Dreier, Randy Dunlap, Jake Edge, Jiri Kosina, Matt Mackall, Arthur Marsh, +Amanda McPherson, Andrew Morton, Andrew Price, Tsugikazu Shibata e Jochen Voß. + +Questo lavoro è stato supportato dalla Linux Foundation; un ringraziamento +speciale ad Amanda McPherson, che ha visto il valore di questo lavoro e lo ha +reso possibile. + +L'importanza d'avere il codice nei sorgenti principali +------------------------------------------------------ + +Alcune aziende e sviluppatori ogni tanto si domandano perché dovrebbero +preoccuparsi di apprendere come lavorare con la comunità del kernel e di +inserire il loro codice nel ramo di sviluppo principale (per ramo principale +s'intende quello mantenuto da Linus Torvalds e usato come base dai +distributori Linux). Nel breve termine, contribuire al codice può sembrare +un costo inutile; può sembra più facile tenere separato il proprio codice e +supportare direttamente i suoi utilizzatori. La verità è che il tenere il +codice separato ("fuori dai sorgenti", *"out-of-tree"*) è un falso risparmio. + +Per dimostrare i costi di un codice "fuori dai sorgenti", eccovi +alcuni aspetti rilevanti del processo di sviluppo kernel; la maggior parte +di essi saranno approfonditi dettagliatamente più avanti in questo documento. +Considerate: + +- Il codice che è stato inserito nel ramo principale del kernel è disponibile + a tutti gli utilizzatori Linux. Sarà automaticamente presente in tutte le + distribuzioni che lo consentono. Non c'è bisogno di: driver per dischi, + scaricare file, o della scocciatura del dover supportare diverse versioni di + diverse distribuzioni; funziona già tutto, per gli sviluppatori e per gli + utilizzatori. L'inserimento nel ramo principale risolve un gran numero di + problemi di distribuzione e di supporto. + +- Nonostante gli sviluppatori kernel si sforzino di tenere stabile + l'interfaccia dello spazio utente, quella interna al kernel è in continuo + cambiamento. La mancanza di un'interfaccia interna è deliberatamente una + decisione di progettazione; ciò permette che i miglioramenti fondamentali + vengano fatti in un qualsiasi momento e che risultino fatti con un codice di + alta qualità. Ma una delle conseguenze di questa politica è che qualsiasi + codice "fuori dai sorgenti" richiede costante manutenzione per renderlo + funzionante coi kernel più recenti. Tenere un codice "fuori dai sorgenti" + richiede una mole di lavoro significativa solo per farlo funzionare. + + Invece, il codice che si trova nel ramo principale non necessita di questo + tipo di lavoro poiché ad ogni sviluppatore che faccia una modifica alle + interfacce viene richiesto di sistemare anche il codice che utilizza + quell'interfaccia. Quindi, il codice che è stato inserito nel ramo principale + ha dei costi di mantenimento significativamente più bassi. + +- Oltre a ciò, spesso il codice che è all'interno del kernel sarà migliorato da + altri sviluppatori. Dare pieni poteri alla vostra comunità di utenti e ai + clienti può portare a sorprendenti risultati che migliorano i vostri + prodotti. + +- Il codice kernel è soggetto a revisioni, sia prima che dopo l'inserimento + nel ramo principale. Non importa quanto forti fossero le abilità dello + sviluppatore originale, il processo di revisione troverà il modo di migliore + il codice. Spesso la revisione trova bachi importanti e problemi di + sicurezza. Questo è particolarmente vero per il codice che è stato + sviluppato in un ambiente chiuso; tale codice ottiene un forte beneficio + dalle revisioni provenienti da sviluppatori esteri. Il codice + "fuori dai sorgenti", invece, è un codice di bassa qualità. + +- La partecipazione al processo di sviluppo costituisce la vostra via per + influenzare la direzione di sviluppo del kernel. Gli utilizzatori che + "reclamano da bordo campo" sono ascoltati, ma gli sviluppatori attivi + hanno una voce più forte - e la capacità di implementare modifiche che + renderanno il kernel più funzionale alle loro necessità. + +- Quando il codice è gestito separatamente, esiste sempre la possibilità che + terze parti contribuiscano con una differente implementazione che fornisce + le stesse funzionalità. Se dovesse accadere, l'inserimento del codice + diventerà molto più difficile - fino all'impossibilità. Poi, dovrete far + fronte a delle alternative poco piacevoli, come: (1) mantenere un elemento + non standard "fuori dai sorgenti" per un tempo indefinito, o (2) abbandonare + il codice e far migrare i vostri utenti alla versione "nei sorgenti". + +- Contribuire al codice è l'azione fondamentale che fa funzionare tutto il + processo. Contribuendo attraverso il vostro codice potete aggiungere nuove + funzioni al kernel e fornire competenze ed esempi che saranno utili ad + altri sviluppatori. Se avete sviluppato del codice Linux (o state pensando + di farlo), avete chiaramente interesse nel far proseguire il successo di + questa piattaforma. Contribuire al codice è une delle migliori vie per + aiutarne il successo. + +Il ragionamento sopra citato si applica ad ogni codice "fuori dai sorgenti" +dal kernel, incluso il codice proprietario distribuito solamente in formato +binario. Ci sono, comunque, dei fattori aggiuntivi che dovrebbero essere +tenuti in conto prima di prendere in considerazione qualsiasi tipo di +distribuzione binaria di codice kernel. Questo include che: + +- Le questioni legali legate alla distribuzione di moduli kernel proprietari + sono molto nebbiose; parecchi detentori di copyright sul kernel credono che + molti moduli binari siano prodotti derivati del kernel e che, come risultato, + la loro diffusione sia una violazione della licenza generale di GNU (della + quale si parlerà più avanti). L'autore qui non è un avvocato, e + niente in questo documento può essere considerato come un consiglio legale. + Il vero stato legale dei moduli proprietari può essere determinato + esclusivamente da un giudice. Ma l'incertezza che perseguita quei moduli + è lì comunque. + +- I moduli binari aumentano di molto la difficoltà di fare debugging del + kernel, al punto che la maggior parte degli sviluppatori del kernel non + vorranno nemmeno tentare. Quindi la diffusione di moduli esclusivamente + binari renderà difficile ai vostri utilizzatori trovare un supporto dalla + comunità. + +- Il supporto è anche difficile per i distributori di moduli binari che devono + fornire una versione del modulo per ogni distribuzione e per ogni versione + del kernel che vogliono supportate. Per fornire una copertura ragionevole e + comprensiva, può essere richiesto di produrre dozzine di singoli moduli. + E inoltre i vostri utilizzatori dovranno aggiornare il vostro modulo + separatamente ogni volta che aggiornano il loro kernel. + +- Tutto ciò che è stato detto prima riguardo alla revisione del codice si + applica doppiamente al codice proprietario. Dato che questo codice non è + del tutto disponibile, non può essere revisionato dalla comunità e avrà, + senza dubbio, seri problemi. + +I produttori di sistemi integrati, in particolare, potrebbero esser tentati +dall'evitare molto di ciò che è stato detto in questa sezione, credendo che +stiano distribuendo un prodotto finito che utilizza una versione del kernel +immutabile e che non richiede un ulteriore sviluppo dopo il rilascio. Questa +idea non comprende il valore di una vasta revisione del codice e il valore +del permettere ai propri utenti di aggiungere funzionalità al vostro prodotto. +Ma anche questi prodotti, hanno una vita commerciale limitata, dopo la quale +deve essere rilasciata una nuova versione. A quel punto, i produttori il cui +codice è nel ramo principale di sviluppo avranno un codice ben mantenuto e +saranno in una posizione migliore per ottenere velocemente un nuovo prodotto +pronto per essere distribuito. + + +Licenza +------- + +IL codice Linux utilizza diverse licenze, ma il codice completo deve essere +compatibile con la seconda versione della licenza GNU General Public License +(GPLv2), che è la licenza che copre la distribuzione del kernel. +Nella pratica, ciò significa che tutti i contributi al codice sono coperti +anche'essi dalla GPLv2 (con, opzionalmente, una dicitura che permette la +possibilità di distribuirlo con licenze più recenti di GPL) o dalla licenza +three-clause BSD. Qualsiasi contributo che non è coperto da una licenza +compatibile non verrà accettata nel kernel. + +Per il codice sottomesso al kernel non è necessario (o richiesto) la +concessione del Copyright. Tutto il codice inserito nel ramo principale del +kernel conserva la sua proprietà originale; ne risulta che ora il kernel abbia +migliaia di proprietari. + +Una conseguenza di questa organizzazione della proprietà è che qualsiasi +tentativo di modifica della licenza del kernel è destinata ad un quasi sicuro +fallimento. Esistono alcuni scenari pratici nei quali il consenso di tutti +i detentori di copyright può essere ottenuto (o il loro codice verrà rimosso +dal kernel). Quindi, in sostanza, non esiste la possibilità che si giunga ad +una versione 3 della licenza GPL nel prossimo futuro. + +È imperativo che tutto il codice che contribuisce al kernel sia legittimamente +software libero. Per questa ragione, un codice proveniente da un contributore +anonimo (o sotto pseudonimo) non verrà accettato. È richiesto a tutti i +contributori di firmare il proprio codice, attestando così che quest'ultimo +può essere distribuito insieme al kernel sotto la licenza GPL. Il codice che +non è stato licenziato come software libero dal proprio creatore, o che +potrebbe creare problemi di copyright per il kernel (come il codice derivante +da processi di ingegneria inversa senza le opportune tutele), non può essere +diffuso. + +Domande relative a questioni legate al copyright sono frequenti nelle liste +di discussione dedicate allo sviluppo di Linux. Tali quesiti, normalmente, +non riceveranno alcuna risposta, ma una cosa deve essere tenuta presente: +le persone che risponderanno a quelle domande non sono avvocati e non possono +fornire supporti legali. Se avete questioni legali relative ai sorgenti +del codice Linux, non esiste alternativa che quella di parlare con un +avvocato esperto nel settore. Fare affidamento sulle risposte ottenute da +una lista di discussione tecnica è rischioso. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/2.Process.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/2.Process.rst @@ -0,0 +1,531 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/2.Process.rst <development_process>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_process: + +Come funziona il processo di sviluppo +===================================== + +Lo sviluppo del Kernel agli inizi degli anno '90 era abbastanza libero, con +un numero di utenti e sviluppatori relativamente basso. Con una base +di milioni di utenti e con 2000 sviluppatori coinvolti nel giro di un anno, +il kernel da allora ha messo in atto un certo numero di procedure per rendere +lo sviluppo più agevole. È richiesta una solida conoscenza di come tale +processo si svolge per poter esserne parte attiva. + +Il quadro d'insieme +------------------- + +Gli sviluppatori kernel utilizzano un calendario di rilascio generico, dove +ogni due o tre mesi viene effettuata un rilascio importante del kernel. +I rilasci più recenti sono stati: + + ====== ================= + 4.11 Aprile 30, 2017 + 4.12 Luglio 2, 2017 + 4.13 Settembre 3, 2017 + 4.14 Novembre 12, 2017 + 4.15 Gennaio 28, 2018 + 4.16 Aprile 1, 2018 + ====== ================= + +Ciascun rilascio 4.x è un importante rilascio del kernel con nuove +funzionalità, modifiche interne dell'API, e molto altro. Un tipico +rilascio 4.x contiene quasi 13,000 gruppi di modifiche con ulteriori +modifiche a parecchie migliaia di linee di codice. La 4.x. è pertanto la +linea di confine nello sviluppo del kernel Linux; il kernel utilizza un sistema +di sviluppo continuo che integra costantemente nuove importanti modifiche. + +Viene seguita una disciplina abbastanza lineare per l'inclusione delle +patch di ogni rilascio. All'inizio di ogni ciclo di sviluppo, la +"finestra di inclusione" viene dichiarata aperta. In quel momento il codice +ritenuto sufficientemente stabile(e che è accettato dalla comunità di sviluppo) +viene incluso nel ramo principale del kernel. La maggior parte delle +patch per un nuovo ciclo di sviluppo (e tutte le più importanti modifiche) +saranno inserite durante questo periodo, ad un ritmo che si attesta sulle +1000 modifiche ("patch" o "gruppo di modifiche") al giorno. + +(per inciso, vale la pena notare che i cambiamenti integrati durante la +"finestra di inclusione" non escono dal nulla; questi infatti, sono stati +raccolti e, verificati in anticipo. Il funzionamento di tale procedimento +verrà descritto dettagliatamente più avanti). + +La finestra di inclusione resta attiva approssimativamente per due settimane. +Al termine di questo periodo, Linus Torvald dichiarerà che la finestra è +chiusa e rilascerà il primo degli "rc" del kernel. +Per il kernel che è destinato ad essere 2.6.40, per esempio, il rilascio +che emerge al termine della finestra d'inclusione si chiamerà 2.6.40-rc1. +Questo rilascio indica che il momento di aggiungere nuovi componenti è +passato, e che è iniziato il periodo di stabilizzazione del prossimo kernel. + +Nelle successive sei/dieci settimane, potranno essere sottoposte solo modifiche +che vanno a risolvere delle problematiche. Occasionalmente potrà essere +consentita una modifica più consistente, ma tali occasioni sono rare. +Gli sviluppatori che tenteranno di aggiungere nuovi elementi al di fuori della +finestra di inclusione, tendenzialmente, riceveranno un accoglienza poco +amichevole. Come regola generale: se vi perdete la finestra di inclusione per +un dato componente, la cosa migliore da fare è aspettare il ciclo di sviluppo +successivo (un'eccezione può essere fatta per i driver per hardware non +supportati in precedenza; se toccano codice non facente parte di quello +attuale, che non causino regressioni e che potrebbero essere aggiunti in +sicurezza in un qualsiasi momento) + +Mentre le correzioni si aprono la loro strada all'interno del ramo principale, +il ritmo delle modifiche rallenta col tempo. Linus rilascia un nuovo +kernel -rc circa una volta alla settimana; e ne usciranno circa 6 o 9 prima +che il kernel venga considerato sufficientemente stabile e che il rilascio +finale 2.6.x venga fatto. A quel punto tutto il processo ricomincerà. + +Esempio: ecco com'è andato il ciclo di sviluppo della versione 4.16 +(tutte le date si collocano nel 2018) + + + ============== ======================================= + Gennaio 28 4.15 rilascio stabile + Febbraio 11 4.16-rc1, finestra di inclusione chiusa + Febbraio 18 4.16-rc2 + Febbraio 25 4.16-rc3 + Marzo 4 4.16-rc4 + Marzo 11 4.16-rc5 + Marzo 18 4.16-rc6 + Marzo 25 4.16-rc7 + Aprile 1 4.17 rilascio stabile + ============== ======================================= + +In che modo gli sviluppatori decidono quando chiudere il ciclo di sviluppo e +creare quindi una rilascio stabile? Un metro valido è il numero di regressioni +rilevate nel precedente rilascio. Nessun baco è il benvenuto, ma quelli che +procurano problemi su sistemi che hanno funzionato in passato sono considerati +particolarmente seri. Per questa ragione, le modifiche che portano ad una +regressione sono viste sfavorevolmente e verranno quasi sicuramente annullate +durante il periodo di stabilizzazione. + +L'obiettivo degli sviluppatori è quello di aggiustare tutte le regressioni +conosciute prima che avvenga il rilascio stabile. Nel mondo reale, questo +tipo di perfezione difficilmente viene raggiunta; esistono troppe variabili +in un progetto di questa portata. Arriva un punto dove ritardare il rilascio +finale peggiora la situazione; la quantità di modifiche in attesa della +prossima finestra di inclusione crescerà enormemente, creando ancor più +regressioni al giro successivo. Quindi molti kernel 4.x escono con una +manciata di regressioni delle quali, si spera, nessuna è grave. + +Una volta che un rilascio stabile è fatto, il suo costante mantenimento è +affidato al "squadra stabilità", attualmente composta da Greg Kroah-Hartman. +Questa squadra rilascia occasionalmente degli aggiornamenti relativi al +rilascio stabile usando la numerazione 4.x.y. Per essere presa in +considerazione per un rilascio d'aggiornamento, una modifica deve: +(1) correggere un baco importante (2) essere già inserita nel ramo principale +per il prossimo sviluppo del kernel. Solitamente, passato il loro rilascio +iniziale, i kernel ricevono aggiornamenti per più di un ciclo di sviluppo. +Quindi, per esempio, la storia del kernel 4.13 appare così: + + ============== =============================== + Settembre 3 4.13 rilascio stabile + Settembre 13 4.13.1 + Settembre 20 4.13.2 + Settembre 27 4.13.3 + Ottobre 5 4.13.4 + Ottobre 12 4.13.5 + ... ... + Novembre 24 4.13.16 + ============== =============================== + +La 4.13.16 fu l'aggiornamento finale per la versione 4.13. + +Alcuni kernel sono destinati ad essere kernel a "lungo termine"; questi +riceveranno assistenza per un lungo periodo di tempo. Al momento in cui +scriviamo, i manutentori dei kernel stabili a lungo termine sono: + + ====== ====================== ========================================== + 3.16 Ben Hutchings (kernel stabile molto più a lungo termine) + 4.1 Sasha Levin + 4.4 Greg Kroah-Hartman (kernel stabile molto più a lungo termine) + 4.9 Greg Kroah-Hartman + 4.14 Greg Kroah-Hartman + ====== ====================== ========================================== + + +Questa selezione di kernel di lungo periodo sono puramente dovuti ai loro +manutentori, alla loro necessità e al tempo per tenere aggiornate proprio +quelle versioni. Non ci sono altri kernel a lungo termine in programma per +alcun rilascio in arrivo. + +Il ciclo di vita di una patch +----------------------------- + +Le patch non passano direttamente dalla tastiera dello sviluppatori +al ramo principale del kernel. Esiste, invece, una procedura disegnata +per assicurare che ogni patch sia di buona qualità e desiderata nel +ramo principale. Questo processo avviene velocemente per le correzioni +meno importanti, o, nel caso di patch ampie e controverse, va avanti per anni. +Per uno sviluppatore la maggior frustrazione viene dalla mancanza di +comprensione di questo processo o dai tentativi di aggirarlo. + +Nella speranza di ridurre questa frustrazione, questo documento spiegherà +come una patch viene inserita nel kernel. Ciò che segue è un'introduzione +che descrive il processo ideale. Approfondimenti verranno invece trattati +più avanti. + +Una patch attraversa, generalmente, le seguenti fasi: + + - Progetto. In questa fase sono stabilite quelli che sono i requisiti + della modifica - e come verranno soddisfatti. Il lavoro di progettazione + viene spesso svolto senza coinvolgere la comunità, ma è meglio renderlo + il più aperto possibile; questo può far risparmiare molto tempo evitando + eventuali riprogettazioni successive. + + - Prima revisione. Le patch vengono pubblicate sulle liste di discussione + interessate, e gli sviluppatori in quella lista risponderanno coi loro + commenti. Se si svolge correttamente, questo procedimento potrebbe far + emergere problemi rilevanti in una patch. + + - Revisione più ampia. Quando la patch è quasi pronta per essere inserita + nel ramo principale, un manutentore importante del sottosistema dovrebbe + accettarla - anche se, questa accettazione non è una garanzia che la + patch arriverà nel ramo principale. La patch sarà visibile nei sorgenti + del sottosistema in questione e nei sorgenti -next (descritti sotto). + Quando il processo va a buon fine, questo passo porta ad una revisione + più estesa della patch e alla scoperta di problemi d'integrazione + con il lavoro altrui. + +- Per favore, tenete da conto che la maggior parte dei manutentori ha + anche un lavoro quotidiano, quindi integrare le vostre patch potrebbe + non essere la loro priorità più alta. Se una vostra patch riceve + dei suggerimenti su dei cambiamenti necessari, dovreste applicare + quei cambiamenti o giustificare perché non sono necessari. Se la vostra + patch non riceve alcuna critica ma non è stata integrata dal + manutentore del driver o sottosistema, allora dovreste continuare con + i necessari aggiornamenti per mantenere la patch aggiornata al kernel + più recente cosicché questa possa integrarsi senza problemi; continuate + ad inviare gli aggiornamenti per essere revisionati e integrati. + + - Inclusione nel ramo principale. Eventualmente, una buona patch verrà + inserita all'interno nel repositorio principale, gestito da + Linus Torvalds. In questa fase potrebbero emergere nuovi problemi e/o + commenti; è importante che lo sviluppatore sia collaborativo e che sistemi + ogni questione che possa emergere. + + - Rilascio stabile. Ora, il numero di utilizzatori che sono potenzialmente + toccati dalla patch è aumentato, quindi, ancora una volta, potrebbero + emergere nuovi problemi. + + - Manutenzione di lungo periodo. Nonostante sia possibile che uno sviluppatore + si dimentichi del codice dopo la sua integrazione, questo comportamento + lascia una brutta impressione nella comunità di sviluppo. Integrare il + codice elimina alcuni degli oneri facenti parte della manutenzione, in + particolare, sistemerà le problematiche causate dalle modifiche all'API. + Ma lo sviluppatore originario dovrebbe continuare ad assumersi la + responsabilità per il codice se quest'ultimo continua ad essere utile + nel lungo periodo. + +Uno dei più grandi errori fatti dagli sviluppatori kernel (o dai loro datori +di lavoro) è quello di cercare di ridurre tutta la procedura ad una singola +"integrazione nel remo principale". Questo approccio inevitabilmente conduce +a una condizione di frustrazione per tutti coloro che sono coinvolti. + +Come le modifiche finiscono nel Kernel +-------------------------------------- + +Esiste una sola persona che può inserire le patch nel repositorio principale +del kernel: Linus Torvalds. Ma, di tutte le 9500 patch che entrarono nella +versione 2.6.38 del kernel, solo 112 (circa l'1,3%) furono scelte direttamente +da Linus in persona. Il progetto del kernel è cresciuto fino a raggiungere +una dimensione tale per cui un singolo sviluppatore non può controllare e +selezionare indipendentemente ogni modifica senza essere supportato. +La via scelta dagli sviluppatori per indirizzare tale crescita è stata quella +di utilizzare un sistema di "sottotenenti" basato sulla fiducia. + +Il codice base del kernel è spezzato in una serie si sottosistemi: rete, +supporto per specifiche architetture, gestione della memoria, video e +strumenti, etc. Molti sottosistemi hanno un manutentore designato: ovvero uno +sviluppatore che ha piena responsabilità di tutto il codice presente in quel +sottosistema. Tali manutentori di sottosistema sono i guardiani +(in un certo senso) della parte di kernel che gestiscono; sono coloro che +(solitamente) accetteranno una patch per l'inclusione nel ramo principale +del kernel. + +I manutentori di sottosistema gestiscono ciascuno la propria parte dei sorgenti +del kernel, utilizzando abitualmente (ma certamente non sempre) git. +Strumenti come git (e affini come quilt o mercurial) permettono ai manutentori +di stilare una lista delle patch, includendo informazioni sull'autore ed +altri metadati. In ogni momento, il manutentore può individuare quale patch +nel sua repositorio non si trova nel ramo principale. + +Quando la "finestra di integrazione" si apre, i manutentori di alto livello +chiederanno a Linus di "prendere" dai loro repositori le modifiche che hanno +selezionato per l'inclusione. Se Linus acconsente, il flusso di patch si +convoglierà nel repositorio di quest ultimo, divenendo così parte del ramo +principale del kernel. La quantità d'attenzione che Linus presta alle +singole patch ricevute durante l'operazione di integrazione varia. +È chiaro che, qualche volta, guardi più attentamente. Ma, come regola +generale, Linus confida nel fatto che i manutentori di sottosistema non +selezionino pessime patch. + +I manutentori di sottosistemi, a turno, possono "prendere" patch +provenienti da altri manutentori. Per esempio, i sorgenti per la rete rete +sono costruiti da modifiche che si sono accumulate inizialmente nei sorgenti +dedicati ai driver per dispositivi di rete, rete senza fili, ecc. Tale +catena di repositori può essere più o meno lunga, benché raramente ecceda +i due o tre collegamenti. Questo processo è conosciuto come +"la catena della fiducia", perché ogni manutentore all'interno della +catena si fida di coloro che gestiscono i livelli più bassi. + +Chiaramente, in un sistema come questo, l'inserimento delle patch all'interno +del kernel si basa sul trovare il manutentore giusto. Di norma, inviare +patch direttamente a Linus non è la via giusta. + + +Sorgenti -next +-------------- + +La catena di sottosistemi guida il flusso di patch all'interno del kernel, +ma solleva anche un interessante quesito: se qualcuno volesse vedere tutte le +patch pronte per la prossima finestra di integrazione? +Gli sviluppatori si interesseranno alle patch in sospeso per verificare +che non ci siano altri conflitti di cui preoccuparsi; una modifica che, per +esempio, cambia il prototipo di una funzione fondamentale del kernel andrà in +conflitto con qualsiasi altra modifica che utilizzi la vecchia versione di +quella funzione. Revisori e tester vogliono invece avere accesso alle +modifiche nella loro totalità prima che approdino nel ramo principale del +kernel. Uno potrebbe prendere le patch provenienti da tutti i sottosistemi +d'interesse, ma questo sarebbe un lavoro enorme e fallace. + +La risposta ci viene sotto forma di sorgenti -next, dove i sottosistemi sono +raccolti per essere testati e controllati. Il più vecchio di questi sorgenti, +gestito da Andrew Morton, è chiamato "-mm" (memory management, che è l'inizio +di tutto). L'-mm integra patch proveniente da una lunga lista di sottosistemi; +e ha, inoltre, alcune patch destinate al supporto del debugging. + +Oltre a questo, -mm contiene una raccolta significativa di patch che sono +state selezionate da Andrew direttamente. Queste patch potrebbero essere +state inviate in una lista di discussione, o possono essere applicate ad una +parte del kernel per la quale non esiste un sottosistema dedicato. +Di conseguenza, -mm opera come una specie di sottosistema "ultima spiaggia"; +se per una patch non esiste una via chiara per entrare nel ramo principale, +allora è probabile che finirà in -mm. Le patch passate per -mm +eventualmente finiranno nel sottosistema più appropriato o saranno inviate +direttamente a Linus. In un tipico ciclo di sviluppo, circa il 5-10% delle +patch andrà nel ramo principale attraverso -mm. + +La patch -mm correnti sono disponibili nella cartella "mmotm" (-mm of +the moment) all'indirizzo: + + http://www.ozlabs.org/~akpm/mmotm/ + +È molto probabile che l'uso dei sorgenti MMOTM diventi un'esperienza +frustrante; ci sono buone probabilità che non compili nemmeno. + +I sorgenti principali per il prossimo ciclo d'integrazione delle patch +è linux-next, gestito da Stephen Rothwell. I sorgenti linux-next sono, per +definizione, un'istantanea di come dovrà apparire il ramo principale dopo che +la prossima finestra di inclusione si chiuderà. I linux-next sono annunciati +sulla lista di discussione linux-kernel e linux-next nel momento in cui +vengono assemblati; e possono essere scaricate da: + + http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/next/ + +Linux-next è divenuto parte integrante del processo di sviluppo del kernel; +tutte le patch incorporate durante una finestra di integrazione dovrebbero +aver trovato la propria strada in linux-next, a volte anche prima dell'apertura +della finestra di integrazione. + + +Sorgenti in preparazione +------------------------ + +Nei sorgenti del kernel esiste la cartella drivers/staging/, dove risiedono +molte sotto-cartelle per i driver o i filesystem che stanno per essere aggiunti +al kernel. Questi restano nella cartella drivers/staging fintanto che avranno +bisogno di maggior lavoro; una volta completato, possono essere spostate +all'interno del kernel nel posto più appropriato. Questo è il modo di tener +traccia dei driver che non sono ancora in linea con gli standard di codifica +o qualità, ma che le persone potrebbero voler usare ugualmente e tracciarne +lo sviluppo. + +Greg Kroah-Hartman attualmente gestisce i sorgenti in preparazione. I driver +che non sono completamente pronti vengono inviati a lui, e ciascun driver avrà +la propria sotto-cartella in drivers/staging/. Assieme ai file sorgenti +dei driver, dovrebbe essere presente nella stessa cartella anche un file TODO. +Il file TODO elenca il lavoro ancora da fare su questi driver per poter essere +accettati nel kernel, e indica anche la lista di persone da inserire in copia +conoscenza per ogni modifica fatta. Le regole attuali richiedono che i +driver debbano, come minimo, compilare adeguatamente. + +La *preparazione* può essere una via relativamente facile per inserire nuovi +driver all'interno del ramo principale, dove, con un po' di fortuna, saranno +notati da altri sviluppatori e migliorati velocemente. Entrare nella fase +di preparazione non è però la fine della storia, infatti, il codice che si +trova nella cartella staging che non mostra regolari progressi potrebbe +essere rimosso. Le distribuzioni, inoltre, tendono a dimostrarsi relativamente +riluttanti nell'attivare driver in preparazione. Quindi lo preparazione è, +nel migliore dei casi, una tappa sulla strada verso il divenire un driver +del ramo principale. + + +Strumenti +--------- + +Come è possibile notare dal testo sopra, il processo di sviluppo del kernel +dipende pesantemente dalla capacità di guidare la raccolta di patch in +diverse direzioni. L'intera cosa non funzionerebbe se non venisse svolta +con l'uso di strumenti appropriati e potenti. Spiegare l'uso di tali +strumenti non è lo scopo di questo documento, ma c'è spazio per alcuni +consigli. + +In assoluto, nella comunità del kernel, predomina l'uso di git come sistema +di gestione dei sorgenti. Git è una delle diverse tipologie di sistemi +distribuiti di controllo versione che sono stati sviluppati nella comunità +del software libero. Esso è calibrato per lo sviluppo del kernel, e si +comporta abbastanza bene quando ha a che fare con repositori grandi e con un +vasto numero di patch. Git ha inoltre la reputazione di essere difficile +da imparare e utilizzare, benché stia migliorando. Agli sviluppatori +del kernel viene richiesta un po' di familiarità con git; anche se non lo +utilizzano per il proprio lavoro, hanno bisogno di git per tenersi al passo +con il lavoro degli altri sviluppatori (e con il ramo principale). + +Git è ora compreso in quasi tutte le distribuzioni Linux. Esiste una sito che +potete consultare: + + http://git-scm.com/ + +Qui troverete i riferimenti alla documentazione e alle guide passo-passo. + +Tra gli sviluppatori Kernel che non usano git, la scelta alternativa più +popolare è quasi sicuramente Mercurial: + + http://www.selenic.com/mercurial/ + +Mercurial condivide diverse caratteristiche con git, ma fornisce +un'interfaccia che potrebbe risultare più semplice da utilizzare. + +L'altro strumento che vale la pena conoscere è Quilt: + + http://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/quilt/ + + +Quilt è un sistema di gestione delle patch, piuttosto che un sistema +di gestione dei sorgenti. Non mantiene uno storico degli eventi; ma piuttosto +è orientato verso il tracciamento di uno specifico insieme di modifiche +rispetto ad un codice in evoluzione. Molti dei più grandi manutentori di +sottosistema utilizzano quilt per gestire le patch che dovrebbero essere +integrate. Per la gestione di certe tipologie di sorgenti (-mm, per esempio), +quilt è il miglior strumento per svolgere il lavoro. + + +Liste di discussione +-------------------- + +Una grossa parte del lavoro di sviluppo del Kernel Linux viene svolto tramite +le liste di discussione. È difficile essere un membro della comunità +pienamente coinvolto se non si partecipa almeno ad una lista da qualche +parte. Ma, le liste di discussione di Linux rappresentano un potenziale +problema per gli sviluppatori, che rischiano di venir sepolti da un mare di +email, restare incagliati nelle convenzioni in vigore nelle liste Linux, +o entrambi. + +Molte delle liste di discussione del Kernel girano su vger.kernel.org; +l'elenco principale lo si trova sul sito: + + http://vger.kernel.org/vger-lists.html + +Esistono liste gestite altrove; un certo numero di queste sono in +lists.redhat.com. + +La lista di discussione principale per lo sviluppo del kernel è, ovviamente, +linux-kernel. Questa lista è un luogo ostile dove trovarsi; i volumi possono +raggiungere i 500 messaggi al giorno, la quantità di "rumore" è elevata, +la conversazione può essere strettamente tecnica e i partecipanti non sono +sempre preoccupati di mostrare un alto livello di educazione. Ma non esiste +altro luogo dove la comunità di sviluppo del kernel si unisce per intero; +gli sviluppatori che evitano tale lista si perderanno informazioni importanti. + +Ci sono alcuni consigli che possono essere utili per sopravvivere a +linux-kernel: + +- Tenete la lista in una cartella separata, piuttosto che inserirla nella + casella di posta principale. Così da essere in grado di ignorare il flusso + di mail per un certo periodo di tempo. + +- Non cercate di seguire ogni conversazione - nessuno lo fa. È importante + filtrare solo gli argomenti d'interesse (sebbene va notato che le + conversazioni di lungo periodo possono deviare dall'argomento originario + senza cambiare il titolo della mail) e le persone che stanno partecipando. + +- Non alimentate i troll. Se qualcuno cerca di creare nervosismo, ignoratelo. + +- Quando rispondete ad una mail linux-kernel (o ad altre liste) mantenete + tutti i Cc:. In assenza di importanti motivazioni (come una richiesta + esplicita), non dovreste mai togliere destinatari. Assicuratevi sempre che + la persona alla quale state rispondendo sia presente nella lista Cc. Questa + usanza fa si che divenga inutile chiedere esplicitamente di essere inseriti + in copia nel rispondere al vostro messaggio. + +- Cercate nell'archivio della lista (e nella rete nella sua totalità) prima + di far domande. Molti sviluppatori possono divenire impazienti con le + persone che chiaramente non hanno svolto i propri compiti a casa. + +- Evitate il *top-posting* (cioè la pratica di mettere la vostra risposta sopra + alla frase alla quale state rispondendo). Ciò renderebbe la vostra risposta + difficile da leggere e genera scarsa impressione. + +- Chiedete nella lista di discussione corretta. Linux-kernel può essere un + punto di incontro generale, ma non è il miglior posto dove trovare + sviluppatori da tutti i sottosistemi. + +Infine, la ricerca della corretta lista di discussione è uno degli errori più +comuni per gli sviluppatori principianti. Qualcuno che pone una domanda +relativa alla rete su linux-kernel riceverà quasi certamente il suggerimento +di chiedere sulla lista netdev, che è la lista frequentata dagli sviluppatori +di rete. Ci sono poi altre liste per i sottosistemi SCSI, video4linux, IDE, +filesystem, etc. Il miglior posto dove cercare una lista di discussione è il +file MAINTAINERS che si trova nei sorgenti del kernel. + +Iniziare con lo sviluppo del Kernel +----------------------------------- + +Sono comuni le domande sul come iniziare con lo sviluppo del kernel - sia da +singole persone che da aziende. Altrettanto comuni sono i passi falsi che +rendono l'inizio di tale relazione più difficile di quello che dovrebbe essere. + +Le aziende spesso cercano di assumere sviluppatori noti per creare un gruppo +di sviluppo iniziale. Questo, in effetti, può essere una tecnica efficace. +Ma risulta anche essere dispendiosa e non va ad accrescere il bacino di +sviluppatori kernel con esperienza. È possibile anche "portare a casa" +sviluppatori per accelerare lo sviluppo del kernel, dando comunque +all'investimento un po' di tempo. Prendersi questo tempo può fornire +al datore di lavoro un gruppo di sviluppatori che comprendono sia il kernel +che l'azienda stessa, e che possono supportare la formazione di altre persone. +Nel medio periodo, questa è spesso uno delle soluzioni più proficue. + +I singoli sviluppatori sono spesso, comprensibilmente, una perdita come punto +di partenza. Iniziare con un grande progetto può rivelarsi intimidatorio; +spesso all'inizio si vuole solo verificare il terreno con qualcosa di piccolo. +Questa è una delle motivazioni per le quali molti sviluppatori saltano alla +creazione di patch che vanno a sistemare errori di battitura o +problematiche minori legate allo stile del codice. Sfortunatamente, tali +patch creano un certo livello di rumore che distrae l'intera comunità di +sviluppo, quindi, sempre di più, esse vengono degradate. I nuovi sviluppatori +che desiderano presentarsi alla comunità non riceveranno l'accoglienza +che vorrebbero con questi mezzi. + +Andrew Morton da questo consiglio agli aspiranti sviluppatori kernel + +:: + + Il primo progetto per un neofita del kernel dovrebbe essere + sicuramente quello di "assicurarsi che il kernel funzioni alla + perfezione sempre e su tutte le macchine sulle quali potete stendere + la vostra mano". Solitamente il modo per fare ciò è quello di + collaborare con gli altri nel sistemare le cose (questo richiede + persistenza!) ma va bene - è parte dello sviluppo kernel. + +(http://lwn.net/Articles/283982/). + +In assenza di problemi ovvi da risolvere, si consiglia agli sviluppatori +di consultare, in generale, la lista di regressioni e di bachi aperti. +Non c'è mai carenza di problematiche bisognose di essere sistemate; +accollandosi tali questioni gli sviluppatori accumuleranno esperienza con +la procedura, ed allo stesso tempo, aumenteranno la loro rispettabilità +all'interno della comunità di sviluppo. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/3.Early-stage.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/3.Early-stage.rst @@ -0,0 +1,241 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/3.Early-stage.rst <development_early_stage>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_early_stage: + +I primi passi della pianificazione +================================== + +Osservando un progetto di sviluppo per il kernel Linux, si potrebbe essere +tentati dal saltare tutto e iniziare a codificare. Tuttavia, come ogni +progetto significativo, molta della preparazione per giungere al successo +viene fatta prima che una sola linea di codice venga scritta. Il tempo speso +nella pianificazione e la comunicazione può far risparmiare molto +tempo in futuro. + +Specificare il problema +----------------------- + +Come qualsiasi progetto ingegneristico, un miglioramento del kernel di +successo parte con una chiara descrizione del problema da risolvere. +In alcuni casi, questo passaggio è facile: ad esempio quando un driver è +richiesto per un particolare dispositivo. In altri casi invece, si +tende a confondere il problema reale con le soluzioni proposte e questo +può portare all'emergere di problemi. + +Facciamo un esempio: qualche anno fa, gli sviluppatori che lavoravano con +linux audio cercarono un modo per far girare le applicazioni senza dropouts +o altri artefatti dovuti all'eccessivo ritardo nel sistema. La soluzione +alla quale giunsero fu un modulo del kernel destinato ad agganciarsi al +framework Linux Security Module (LSM); questo modulo poteva essere +configurato per dare ad una specifica applicazione accesso allo +schedulatore *realtime*. Tale modulo fu implementato e inviato nella +lista di discussione linux-kernel, dove incontrò subito dei problemi. + +Per gli sviluppatori audio, questo modulo di sicurezza era sufficiente a +risolvere il loro problema nell'immediato. Per l'intera comunità kernel, +invece, era un uso improprio del framework LSM (che non è progettato per +conferire privilegi a processi che altrimenti non avrebbero potuto ottenerli) +e un rischio per la stabilità del sistema. Le loro soluzioni di punta nel +breve periodo, comportavano un accesso alla schedulazione realtime attraverso +il meccanismo rlimit, e nel lungo periodo un costante lavoro nella riduzione +dei ritardi. + +La comunità audio, comunque, non poteva vedere al di là della singola +soluzione che avevano implementato; erano riluttanti ad accettare alternative. +Il conseguente dissenso lasciò in quegli sviluppatori un senso di +disillusione nei confronti dell'intero processo di sviluppo; uno di loro +scrisse questo messaggio: + + Ci sono numerosi sviluppatori del kernel Linux davvero bravi, ma + rischiano di restare sovrastati da una vasta massa di stolti arroganti. + Cercare di comunicare le richieste degli utenti a queste persone è + una perdita di tempo. Loro sono troppo "intelligenti" per stare ad + ascoltare dei poveri mortali. + + (http://lwn.net/Articles/131776/). + +La realtà delle cose fu differente; gli sviluppatori del kernel erano molto +più preoccupati per la stabilità del sistema, per la manutenzione di lungo +periodo e cercavano la giusta soluzione alla problematica esistente con uno +specifico modulo. La morale della storia è quella di concentrarsi sul +problema - non su di una specifica soluzione- e di discuterne con la comunità +di sviluppo prima di investire tempo nella scrittura del codice. + +Quindi, osservando un progetto di sviluppo del kernel, si dovrebbe +rispondere a questa lista di domande: + +- Qual'è, precisamente, il problema che dev'essere risolto? + +- Chi sono gli utenti coinvolti da tal problema? A quale caso dovrebbe + essere indirizzata la soluzione? + +- In che modo il kernel risulta manchevole nell'indirizzare il problema + in questione? + +Solo dopo ha senso iniziare a considerare le possibili soluzioni. + +Prime discussioni +----------------- + +Quando si pianifica un progetto di sviluppo per il kernel, sarebbe quanto meno +opportuno discuterne inizialmente con la comunità prima di lanciarsi +nell'implementazione. Una discussione preliminare può far risparmiare sia +tempo che problemi in svariati modi: + + - Potrebbe essere che il problema sia già stato risolto nel kernel in + una maniera che non avete ancora compreso. Il kernel Linux è grande e ha + una serie di funzionalità e capacità che non sono scontate nell'immediato. + Non tutte le capacità del kernel sono documentate così bene come ci + piacerebbe, ed è facile perdersi qualcosa. Il vostro autore ha assistito + alla pubblicazione di un driver intero che duplica un altro driver + esistente di cui il nuovo autore era ignaro. Il codice che rinnova + ingranaggi già esistenti non è soltanto dispendioso; non verrà nemmeno + accettato nel ramo principale del kernel. + + - Potrebbero esserci proposte che non sono considerate accettabili per + l'integrazione all'interno del ramo principale. È meglio affrontarle + prima di scrivere il codice. + + - È possibile che altri sviluppatori abbiano pensato al problema; potrebbero + avere delle idee per soluzioni migliori, e potrebbero voler contribuire + alla loro creazione. + +Anni di esperienza con la comunità di sviluppo del kernel hanno impartito una +chiara lezione: il codice per il kernel che è pensato e sviluppato a porte +chiuse, inevitabilmente, ha problematiche che si rivelano solo quando il +codice viene rilasciato pubblicamente. Qualche volta tali problemi sono +importanti e richiedono mesi o anni di sforzi prima che il codice possa +raggiungere gli standard richiesti della comunità. +Alcuni esempi possono essere: + + - La rete Devicescape è stata creata e implementata per sistemi + mono-processore. Non avrebbe potuto essere inserita nel ramo principale + fino a che non avesse supportato anche i sistemi multi-processore. + Riadattare i meccanismi di sincronizzazione e simili è un compito difficile; + come risultato, l'inserimento di questo codice (ora chiamato mac80211) + fu rimandato per più di un anno. + + - Il filesystem Reiser4 include una seria di funzionalità che, secondo + l'opinione degli sviluppatori principali del kernel, avrebbero dovuto + essere implementate a livello di filesystem virtuale. Comprende + anche funzionalità che non sono facilmente implementabili senza esporre + il sistema al rischio di uno stallo. La scoperta tardiva di questi + problemi - e il diniego a risolverne alcuni - ha avuto come conseguenza + il fatto che Raiser4 resta fuori dal ramo principale del kernel. + + - Il modulo di sicurezza AppArmor utilizzava strutture dati del + filesystem virtuale interno in modi che sono stati considerati rischiosi e + inattendibili. Questi problemi (tra le altre cose) hanno tenuto AppArmor + fuori dal ramo principale per anni. + +Ciascuno di questi casi è stato un travaglio e ha richiesto del lavoro +straordinario, cose che avrebbero potuto essere evitate con alcune +"chiacchierate" preliminari con gli sviluppatori kernel. + +Con chi parlare? +---------------- + +Quando gli sviluppatori hanno deciso di rendere pubblici i propri progetti, la +domanda successiva sarà: da dove partiamo? La risposta è quella di trovare +la giusta lista di discussione e il giusto manutentore. Per le liste di +discussione, il miglior approccio è quello di cercare la lista più adatta +nel file MAINTAINERS. Se esiste una lista di discussione di sottosistema, +è preferibile pubblicare lì piuttosto che sulla lista di discussione generale +del kernel Linux; avrete maggiori probabilità di trovare sviluppatori con +esperienza sul tema, e l'ambiente che troverete potrebbe essere più +incoraggiante. + +Trovare manutentori può rivelarsi un po' difficoltoso. Ancora, il file +MAINTAINERS è il posto giusto da dove iniziare. Il file potrebbe non essere +sempre aggiornato, inoltre, non tutti i sottosistemi sono rappresentati qui. +Coloro che sono elencati nel file MAINTAINERS potrebbero, in effetti, non +essere le persone che attualmente svolgono quel determinato ruolo. Quindi, +quando c'è un dubbio su chi contattare, un trucco utile è quello di usare +git (git log in particolare) per vedere chi attualmente è attivo all'interno +del sottosistema interessato. Controllate chi sta scrivendo le patch, +e chi, se non ci fosse nessuno, sta aggiungendo la propria firma +(Signed-off-by) a quelle patch. Quelle sono le persone maggiormente +qualificate per aiutarvi con lo sviluppo di nuovo progetto. + +Il compito di trovare il giusto manutentore, a volte, è una tale sfida che +ha spinto gli sviluppatori del kernel a scrivere uno script che li aiutasse +in questa ricerca: + +:: + + .../scripts/get_maintainer.pl + +Se questo script viene eseguito con l'opzione "-f" ritornerà il +manutentore(i) attuale per un dato file o cartella. Se viene passata una +patch sulla linea di comando, lo script elencherà i manutentori che +dovrebbero riceverne una copia. Ci sono svariate opzioni che regolano +quanto a fondo get_maintainer.pl debba cercare i manutentori; +siate quindi prudenti nell'utilizzare le opzioni più aggressive poiché +potreste finire per includere sviluppatori che non hanno un vero interesse +per il codice che state modificando. + +Se tutto ciò dovesse fallire, parlare con Andrew Morton potrebbe essere +un modo efficace per capire chi è il manutentore di un dato pezzo di codice. + +Quando pubblicare +----------------- + +Se potete, pubblicate i vostri intenti durante le fasi preliminari, sarà +molto utile. Descrivete il problema da risolvere e ogni piano che è stato +elaborato per l'implementazione. Ogni informazione fornita può aiutare +la comunità di sviluppo a fornire spunti utili per il progetto. + +Un evento che potrebbe risultare scoraggiate e che potrebbe accadere in +questa fase non è il ricevere una risposta ostile, ma, invece, ottenere +una misera o inesistente reazione. La triste verità è che: (1) gli +sviluppatori del kernel tendono ad essere occupati, (2) ci sono tante persone +con grandi progetti e poco codice (o anche solo la prospettiva di +avere un codice) a cui riferirsi e (3) nessuno è obbligato a revisionare +o a fare osservazioni in merito ad idee pubblicate da altri. Oltre a +questo, progetti di alto livello spesso nascondono problematiche che si +rivelano solo quando qualcuno cerca di implementarle; per questa ragione +gli sviluppatori kernel preferirebbero vedere il codice. + +Quindi, se una richiesta pubblica di commenti riscuote poco successo, non +pensate che ciò significhi che non ci sia interesse nel progetto. +Sfortunatamente, non potete nemmeno assumere che non ci siano problemi con +la vostra idea. La cosa migliore da fare in questa situazione è quella di +andare avanti e tenere la comunità informata mentre procedete. + +Ottenere riscontri ufficiali +---------------------------- + +Se il vostro lavoro è stato svolto in un ambiente aziendale - come molto +del lavoro fatto su Linux - dovete, ovviamente, avere il permesso dei +dirigenti prima che possiate pubblicare i progetti, o il codice aziendale, +su una lista di discussione pubblica. La pubblicazione di codice che non +è stato rilascio espressamente con licenza GPL-compatibile può rivelarsi +problematico; prima la dirigenza, e il personale legale, troverà una decisione +sulla pubblicazione di un progetto, meglio sarà per tutte le persone coinvolte. + +A questo punto, alcuni lettori potrebbero pensare che il loro lavoro sul +kernel è preposto a supportare un prodotto che non è ancora ufficialmente +riconosciuto. Rivelare le intenzioni dei propri datori di lavori in una +lista di discussione pubblica potrebbe non essere una soluzione valida. +In questi casi, vale la pena considerare se la segretezza sia necessaria +o meno; spesso non c'è una reale necessità di mantenere chiusi i progetti di +sviluppo. + +Detto ciò, ci sono anche casi dove l'azienda legittimamente non può rivelare +le proprie intenzioni in anticipo durante il processo di sviluppo. Le aziende +che hanno sviluppatori kernel esperti possono scegliere di procedere a +carte coperte partendo dall'assunto che saranno in grado di evitare, o gestire, +in futuro, eventuali problemi d'integrazione. Per le aziende senza questo tipo +di esperti, la migliore opzione è spesso quella di assumere uno sviluppatore +esterno che revisioni i progetti con un accordo di segretezza. +La Linux Foundation applica un programma di NDA creato appositamente per +aiutare le aziende in questa particolare situazione; potrete trovare più +informazioni sul sito: + + http://www.linuxfoundation.org/en/NDA_program + +Questa tipologia di revisione è spesso sufficiente per evitare gravi problemi +senza che sia richiesta l'esposizione pubblica del progetto. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/4.Coding.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/4.Coding.rst @@ -0,0 +1,447 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/4.Coding.rst <development_coding>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_coding: + +Scrivere codice corretto +======================== + +Nonostante ci sia molto da dire sul processo di creazione, sulla sua solidità +e sul suo orientamento alla comunità, la prova di ogni progetto di sviluppo +del kernel si trova nel codice stesso. È il codice che sarà esaminato dagli +altri sviluppatori ed inserito (o no) nel ramo principale. Quindi è la +qualità di questo codice che determinerà il successo finale del progetto. + +Questa sezione esaminerà il processo di codifica. Inizieremo con uno sguardo +sulle diverse casistiche nelle quali gli sviluppatori kernel possono +sbagliare. Poi, l'attenzione si sposterà verso "il fare le cose +correttamente" e sugli strumenti che possono essere utili in questa missione. + +Trappole +-------- + +Lo stile del codice +******************* + +Il kernel ha da tempo delle norme sullo stile di codifica che sono descritte in +:ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/coding-style.rst <codingstyle>`. +Per la maggior parte del tempo, la politica descritta in quel file è stata +praticamente informativa. Ne risulta che ci sia una quantità sostanziale di +codice nel kernel che non rispetta le linee guida relative allo stile. +La presenza di quel codice conduce a due distinti pericoli per gli +sviluppatori kernel. + +Il primo di questi è credere che gli standard di codifica del kernel +non sono importanti e possono non essere applicati. La verità è che +aggiungere nuovo codice al kernel è davvero difficile se questo non +rispetta le norme; molti sviluppatori richiederanno che il codice sia +riformulato prima che anche solo lo revisionino. Una base di codice larga +quanto il kernel richiede una certa uniformità, in modo da rendere possibile +per gli sviluppatori una comprensione veloce di ogni sua parte. Non ci sono, +quindi, più spazi per un codice formattato alla carlona. + +Occasionalmente, lo stile di codifica del kernel andrà in conflitto con lo +stile richiesto da un datore di lavoro. In alcuni casi, lo stile del kernel +dovrà prevalere prima che il codice venga inserito. Mettere il codice +all'interno del kernel significa rinunciare a un certo grado di controllo +in differenti modi - incluso il controllo sul come formattare il codice. + +L’altra trappola è quella di pensare che il codice già presente nel kernel +abbia urgentemente bisogno di essere sistemato. Gli sviluppatori potrebbero +iniziare a generare patch che correggono lo stile come modo per prendere +famigliarità con il processo, o come modo per inserire i propri nomi nei +changelog del kernel – o entrambe. La comunità di sviluppo vede un attività +di codifica puramente correttiva come "rumore"; queste attività riceveranno +una fredda accoglienza. Di conseguenza è meglio evitare questo tipo di patch. +Mentre si lavora su un pezzo di codice è normale correggerne anche lo stile, +ma le modifiche di stile non dovrebbero essere fatte fini a se stesse. + +Il documento sullo stile del codice non dovrebbe essere letto come una legge +assoluta che non può mai essere trasgredita. Se c’è un a buona ragione +(per esempio, una linea che diviene poco leggibile se divisa per rientrare +nel limite di 80 colonne), fatelo e basta. + +Notate che potete utilizzare lo strumento “clang-format” per aiutarvi con +le regole, per una riformattazione automatica e veloce del vostro codice +e per revisionare interi file per individuare errori nello stile di codifica, +refusi e possibili miglioramenti. Inoltre è utile anche per classificare gli +``#includes``, per allineare variabili/macro, per testi derivati ed altri +compiti del genere. Consultate il file +:ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/clang-format.rst <clangformat>` +per maggiori dettagli + + +Livelli di astrazione +********************* + + +I professori di Informatica insegnano ai propri studenti a fare ampio uso dei +livelli di astrazione nel nome della flessibilità e del nascondere informazioni. +Certo il kernel fa un grande uso dell'astrazione; nessun progetto con milioni +di righe di codice potrebbe fare altrimenti e sopravvivere. Ma l'esperienza +ha dimostrato che un'eccessiva o prematura astrazione può rivelarsi dannosa +al pari di una prematura ottimizzazione. L'astrazione dovrebbe essere usata +fino al livello necessario e non oltre. + +Ad un livello base, considerate una funzione che ha un argomento che viene +sempre impostato a zero da tutti i chiamanti. Uno potrebbe mantenere +quell'argomento nell'eventualità qualcuno volesse sfruttare la flessibilità +offerta. In ogni caso, tuttavia, ci sono buone possibilità che il codice +che va ad implementare questo argomento aggiuntivo, sia stato rotto in maniera +sottile, in un modo che non è mai stato notato - perché non è mai stato usato. +Oppure, quando sorge la necessità di avere più flessibilità, questo argomento +non la fornisce in maniera soddisfacente. Gli sviluppatori di Kernel, +sottopongono costantemente patch che vanno a rimuovere gli argomenti +inutilizzate; anche se, in generale, non avrebbero dovuto essere aggiunti. + +I livelli di astrazione che nascondono l'accesso all'hardware - +spesso per poter usare dei driver su diversi sistemi operativi - vengono +particolarmente disapprovati. Tali livelli oscurano il codice e possono +peggiorare le prestazioni; essi non appartengono al kernel Linux. + +D'altro canto, se vi ritrovate a dover copiare una quantità significativa di +codice proveniente da un altro sottosistema del kernel, è tempo di chiedersi +se, in effetti, non avrebbe più senso togliere parte di quel codice e metterlo +in una libreria separata o di implementare quella funzionalità ad un livello +più elevato. Non c'è utilità nel replicare lo stesso codice per tutto +il kernel. + + +#ifdef e l'uso del preprocessore in generale +******************************************** + +Il preprocessore C sembra essere una fonte di attrazione per qualche +programmatore C, che ci vede una via per ottenere una grande flessibilità +all'interno di un file sorgente. Ma il preprocessore non è scritto in C, +e un suo massiccio impiego conduce a un codice che è molto più difficile +da leggere per gli altri e che rende più difficile il lavoro di verifica del +compilatore. L'uso eccessivo del preprocessore è praticamente sempre il segno +di un codice che necessita di un certo lavoro di pulizia. + +La compilazione condizionata con #ifdef è, in effetti, un potente strumento, +ed esso viene usato all'interno del kernel. Ma esiste un piccolo desiderio: +quello di vedere il codice coperto solo da una leggera spolverata di +blocchi #ifdef. Come regola generale, quando possibile, l'uso di #ifdef +dovrebbe essere confinato nei file d'intestazione. Il codice compilato +condizionatamente può essere confinato a funzioni tali che, nel caso in cui +il codice non deve essere presente, diventano vuote. Il compilatore poi +ottimizzerà la chiamata alla funzione vuota rimuovendola. Il risultato è +un codice molto più pulito, più facile da seguire. + +Le macro del preprocessore C presentano una serie di pericoli, inclusi +valutazioni multiple di espressioni che hanno effetti collaterali e non +garantiscono una sicurezza rispetto ai tipi. Se siete tentati dal definire +una macro, considerate l'idea di creare invece una funzione inline. Il codice +che ne risulterà sarà lo stesso, ma le funzioni inline sono più leggibili, +non considerano i propri argomenti più volte, e permettono al compilatore di +effettuare controlli sul tipo degli argomenti e del valore di ritorno. + + +Funzioni inline +*************** + +Comunque, anche le funzioni inline hanno i loro pericoli. I programmatori +potrebbero innamorarsi dell'efficienza percepita derivata dalla rimozione +di una chiamata a funzione. Queste funzioni, tuttavia, possono ridurre le +prestazioni. Dato che il loro codice viene replicato ovunque vi sia una +chiamata ad esse, si finisce per gonfiare le dimensioni del kernel compilato. +Questi, a turno, creano pressione sulla memoria cache del processore, e questo +può causare rallentamenti importanti. Le funzioni inline, di norma, dovrebbero +essere piccole e usate raramente. Il costo di una chiamata a funzione, dopo +tutto, non è così alto; la creazione di molte funzioni inline è il classico +esempio di un'ottimizzazione prematura. + +In generale, i programmatori del kernel ignorano gli effetti della cache a +loro rischio e pericolo. Il classico compromesso tempo/spazio teorizzato +all'inizio delle lezioni sulle strutture dati spesso non si applica +all'hardware moderno. Lo spazio *è* tempo, in questo senso un programma +più grande sarà più lento rispetto ad uno più compatto. + +I compilatori più recenti hanno preso un ruolo attivo nel decidere se +una data funzione deve essere resa inline oppure no. Quindi l'uso +indiscriminato della parola chiave "inline" potrebbe non essere non solo +eccessivo, ma anche irrilevante. + +Sincronizzazione +**************** + +Nel maggio 2006, il sistema di rete "Devicescape" fu rilasciato in pompa magna +sotto la licenza GPL e reso disponibile per la sua inclusione nella ramo +principale del kernel. Questa donazione fu una notizia bene accolta; +il supporto per le reti senza fili era considerata, nel migliore dei casi, +al di sotto degli standard; il sistema Deviscape offrì la promessa di una +risoluzione a tale situazione. Tuttavia, questo codice non fu inserito nel +ramo principale fino al giugno del 2007 (2.6.22). Cosa accadde? + +Quel codice mostrava numerosi segnali di uno sviluppo in azienda avvenuto +a porte chiuse. Ma in particolare, un grosso problema fu che non fu +progettato per girare in un sistema multiprocessore. Prima che questo +sistema di rete (ora chiamato mac80211) potesse essere inserito, fu necessario +un lavoro sugli schemi di sincronizzazione. + +Una volta, il codice del kernel Linux poteva essere sviluppato senza pensare +ai problemi di concorrenza presenti nei sistemi multiprocessore. Ora, +comunque, questo documento è stato scritto su di un portatile dual-core. +Persino su sistemi a singolo processore, il lavoro svolto per incrementare +la capacità di risposta aumenterà il livello di concorrenza interno al kernel. +I giorni nei quali il codice poteva essere scritto senza pensare alla +sincronizzazione sono da passati tempo. + +Ogni risorsa (strutture dati, registri hardware, etc.) ai quali si potrebbe +avere accesso simultaneo da più di un thread deve essere sincronizzato. Il +nuovo codice dovrebbe essere scritto avendo tale accortezza in testa; +riadattare la sincronizzazione a posteriori è un compito molto più difficile. +Gli sviluppatori del kernel dovrebbero prendersi il tempo di comprendere bene +le primitive di sincronizzazione, in modo da sceglier lo strumento corretto +per eseguire un compito. Il codice che presenta una mancanza di attenzione +alla concorrenza avrà un percorso difficile all'interno del ramo principale. + +Regressioni +*********** + +Vale la pena menzionare un ultimo pericolo: potrebbe rivelarsi accattivante +l'idea di eseguire un cambiamento (che potrebbe portare a grandi +miglioramenti) che porterà ad alcune rotture per gli utenti esistenti. +Questa tipologia di cambiamento è chiamata "regressione", e le regressioni son +diventate mal viste nel ramo principale del kernel. Con alcune eccezioni, +i cambiamenti che causano regressioni saranno fermati se quest'ultime non +potranno essere corrette in tempo utile. È molto meglio quindi evitare +la regressione fin dall'inizio. + +Spesso si è argomentato che una regressione può essere giustificata se essa +porta risolve più problemi di quanti non ne crei. Perché, dunque, non fare +un cambiamento se questo porta a nuove funzionalità a dieci sistemi per +ognuno dei quali esso determina una rottura? La migliore risposta a questa +domanda ci è stata fornita da Linus nel luglio 2007: + +:: + Dunque, noi non sistemiamo bachi introducendo nuovi problemi. Quella + via nasconde insidie, e nessuno può sapere del tutto se state facendo + dei progressi reali. Sono due passi avanti e uno indietro, oppure + un passo avanti e due indietro? + +(http://lwn.net/Articles/243460/). + +Una particolare tipologia di regressione mal vista consiste in una qualsiasi +sorta di modifica all'ABI dello spazio utente. Una volta che un'interfaccia +viene esportata verso lo spazio utente, dev'essere supportata all'infinito. +Questo fatto rende la creazione di interfacce per lo spazio utente +particolarmente complicato: dato che non possono venir cambiate introducendo +incompatibilità, esse devono essere fatte bene al primo colpo. Per questa +ragione sono sempre richieste: ampie riflessioni, documentazione chiara e +ampie revisioni dell'interfaccia verso lo spazio utente. + + +Strumenti di verifica del codice +-------------------------------- +Almeno per ora la scrittura di codice priva di errori resta un ideale +irraggiungibile ai più. Quello che speriamo di poter fare, tuttavia, è +trovare e correggere molti di questi errori prima che il codice entri nel +ramo principale del kernel. A tal scopo gli sviluppatori del kernel devono +mettere insieme una schiera impressionante di strumenti che possano +localizzare automaticamente un'ampia varietà di problemi. Qualsiasi problema +trovato dal computer è un problema che non affliggerà l'utente in seguito, +ne consegue che gli strumenti automatici dovrebbero essere impiegati ovunque +possibile. + +Il primo passo consiste semplicemente nel fare attenzione agli avvertimenti +proveniente dal compilatore. Versioni moderne di gcc possono individuare +(e segnalare) un gran numero di potenziali errori. Molto spesso, questi +avvertimenti indicano problemi reali. Di regola, il codice inviato per la +revisione non dovrebbe produrre nessun avvertimento da parte del compilatore. +Per mettere a tacere gli avvertimenti, cercate di comprenderne le cause reali +e cercate di evitare le "riparazioni" che fan sparire l'avvertimento senza +però averne trovato la causa. + +Tenete a mente che non tutti gli avvertimenti sono disabilitati di default. +Costruite il kernel con "make EXTRA_CFLAGS=-W" per ottenerli tutti. + +Il kernel fornisce differenti opzioni che abilitano funzionalità di debugging; +molti di queste sono trovano all'interno del sotto menu "kernel hacking". +La maggior parte di queste opzioni possono essere attivate per qualsiasi +kernel utilizzato per lo sviluppo o a scopo di test. In particolare dovreste +attivare: + + - ENABLE_WARN_DEPRECATED, ENABLE_MUST_CHECK, e FRAME_WARN per ottenere degli + avvertimenti dedicati a problemi come l'uso di interfacce deprecate o + l'ignorare un importante valore di ritorno di una funzione. Il risultato + generato da questi avvertimenti può risultare verboso, ma non bisogna + preoccuparsi per gli avvertimenti provenienti da altre parti del kernel. + + - DEBUG_OBJECTS aggiungerà un codice per tracciare il ciclo di vita di + diversi oggetti creati dal kernel e avvisa quando qualcosa viene eseguito + fuori controllo. Se state aggiungendo un sottosistema che crea (ed + esporta) oggetti complessi propri, considerate l'aggiunta di un supporto + al debugging dell'oggetto. + + - DEBUG_SLAB può trovare svariati errori di uso e di allocazione di memoria; + esso dovrebbe esser usato dalla maggior parte dei kernel di sviluppo. + + - DEBUG_SPINLOCK, DEBUG_ATOMIC_SLEEP, e DEBUG_MUTEXES troveranno un certo + numero di errori comuni di sincronizzazione. + +Esistono ancora delle altre opzioni di debugging, di alcune di esse +discuteremo qui sotto. Alcune di esse hanno un forte impatto e non dovrebbero +essere usate tutte le volte. Ma qualche volta il tempo speso nell'capire +le opzioni disponibili porterà ad un risparmio di tempo nel breve termine. + +Uno degli strumenti di debugging più tosti è il *locking checker*, o +"lockdep". Questo strumento traccerà qualsiasi acquisizione e rilascio di +ogni *lock* (spinlock o mutex) nel sistema, l'ordine con il quale i *lock* +sono acquisiti in relazione l'uno con l'altro, l'ambiente corrente di +interruzione, eccetera. Inoltre esso può assicurare che i *lock* vengano +acquisiti sempre nello stesso ordine, che le stesse assunzioni sulle +interruzioni si applichino in tutte le occasioni, e così via. In altre parole, +lockdep può scovare diversi scenari nei quali il sistema potrebbe, in rari +casi, trovarsi in stallo. Questa tipologia di problema può essere grave +(sia per gli sviluppatori che per gli utenti) in un sistema in uso; lockdep +permette di trovare tali problemi automaticamente e in anticipo. + +In qualità di programmatore kernel diligente, senza dubbio, dovrete controllare +il valore di ritorno di ogni operazione (come l'allocazione della memoria) +poiché esso potrebbe fallire. Il nocciolo della questione è che i percorsi +di gestione degli errori, con grande probabilità, non sono mai stati +collaudati del tutto. Il codice collaudato tende ad essere codice bacato; +potrete quindi essere più a vostro agio con il vostro codice se tutti questi +percorsi fossero stati verificati un po' di volte. + +Il kernel fornisce un framework per l'inserimento di fallimenti che fa +esattamente al caso, specialmente dove sono coinvolte allocazioni di memoria. +Con l'opzione per l'inserimento dei fallimenti abilitata, una certa percentuale +di allocazione di memoria sarà destinata al fallimento; questi fallimenti +possono essere ridotti ad uno specifico pezzo di codice. Procedere con +l'inserimento dei fallimenti attivo permette al programmatore di verificare +come il codice risponde quando le cose vanno male. Consultate: +Documentation/fault-injection/fault-injection.txt per avere maggiori +informazioni su come utilizzare questo strumento. + +Altre tipologie di errori possono essere riscontrati con lo strumento di +analisi statica "sparse". Con Sparse, il programmatore può essere avvisato +circa la confusione tra gli indirizzi dello spazio utente e dello spazio +kernel, un miscuglio fra quantità big-endian e little-endian, il passaggio +di un valore intero dove ci sia aspetta un gruppo di flag, e così via. +Sparse deve essere installato separatamente (se il vostra distribuzione non +lo prevede, potete trovarlo su https://sparse.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page); +può essere attivato sul codice aggiungendo "C=1" al comando make. + +Lo strumento "Coccinelle" (http://coccinelle.lip6.fr/) è in grado di trovare +una vasta varietà di potenziali problemi di codifica; e può inoltre proporre +soluzioni per risolverli. Un buon numero di "patch semantiche" per il kernel +sono state preparate nella cartella scripts/coccinelle; utilizzando +"make coccicheck" esso percorrerà tali patch semantiche e farà rapporto su +qualsiasi problema trovato. Per maggiori informazioni, consultate +:ref:`Documentation/dev-tools/coccinelle.rst <devtools_coccinelle>`. + +Altri errori di portabilità sono meglio scovati compilando il vostro codice +per altre architetture. Se non vi accade di avere un sistema S/390 o una +scheda di sviluppo Blackfin sotto mano, potete comunque continuare la fase +di compilazione. Un vasto numero di cross-compilatori per x86 possono +essere trovati al sito: + + http://www.kernel.org/pub/tools/crosstool/ + +Il tempo impiegato nell'installare e usare questi compilatori sarà d'aiuto +nell'evitare situazioni imbarazzanti nel futuro. + + +Documentazione +-------------- + +La documentazione è spesso stata più un'eccezione che una regola nello +sviluppo del kernel. Nonostante questo, un'adeguata documentazione aiuterà +a facilitare l'inserimento di nuovo codice nel kernel, rende la vita più +facile per gli altri sviluppatori e sarà utile per i vostri utenti. In molti +casi, la documentazione è divenuta sostanzialmente obbligatoria. + +La prima parte di documentazione per qualsiasi patch è il suo changelog. +Questi dovrebbero descrivere le problematiche risolte, la tipologia di +soluzione, le persone che lavorano alla patch, ogni effetto rilevante +sulle prestazioni e tutto ciò che può servire per la comprensione della +patch. Assicuratevi che il changelog dica *perché*, vale la pena aggiungere +la patch; un numero sorprendente di sviluppatori sbaglia nel fornire tale +informazione. + +Qualsiasi codice che aggiunge una nuova interfaccia in spazio utente - inclusi +nuovi file in sysfs o /proc - dovrebbe includere la documentazione di tale +interfaccia così da permette agli sviluppatori dello spazio utente di sapere +con cosa stanno lavorando. Consultate: Documentation/ABI/README per avere una +descrizione di come questi documenti devono essere impostati e quali +informazioni devono essere fornite. + +Il file :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/kernel-parameters.rst <kernelparameters>` +descrive tutti i parametri di avvio del kernel. Ogni patch che aggiunga +nuovi parametri dovrebbe aggiungere nuove voci a questo file. + +Ogni nuova configurazione deve essere accompagnata da un testo di supporto +che spieghi chiaramente le opzioni e spieghi quando l'utente potrebbe volerle +selezionare. + +Per molti sottosistemi le informazioni sull'API interna sono documentate sotto +forma di commenti formattati in maniera particolare; questi commenti possono +essere estratti e formattati in differenti modi attraverso lo script +"kernel-doc". Se state lavorando all'interno di un sottosistema che ha +commenti kerneldoc dovreste mantenerli e aggiungerli, in maniera appropriata, +per le funzioni disponibili esternamente. Anche in aree che non sono molto +documentate, non c'è motivo per non aggiungere commenti kerneldoc per il +futuro; infatti, questa può essere un'attività utile per sviluppatori novizi +del kernel. Il formato di questi commenti, assieme alle informazione su come +creare modelli per kerneldoc, possono essere trovati in +:ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/doc-guide/ <doc_guide>`. + +Chiunque legga un ammontare significativo di codice kernel noterà che, spesso, +i commenti si fanno maggiormente notare per la loro assenza. Ancora una volta, +le aspettative verso il nuovo codice sono più alte rispetto al passato; +inserire codice privo di commenti sarà più difficile. Detto ciò, va aggiunto +che non si desiderano commenti prolissi per il codice. Il codice dovrebbe +essere, di per sé, leggibile, con dei commenti che spieghino gli aspetti più +sottili. + +Determinate cose dovrebbero essere sempre commentate. L'uso di barriere +di memoria dovrebbero essere accompagnate da una riga che spieghi perché sia +necessaria. Le regole di sincronizzazione per le strutture dati, generalmente, +necessitano di una spiegazioni da qualche parte. Le strutture dati più +importanti, in generale, hanno bisogno di una documentazione onnicomprensiva. +Le dipendenze che non sono ovvie tra bit separati di codice dovrebbero essere +indicate. Tutto ciò che potrebbe indurre un inserviente del codice a fare +una "pulizia" incorretta, ha bisogno di un commento che dica perché è stato +fatto in quel modo. E così via. + +Cambiamenti interni dell'API +---------------------------- + +L'interfaccia binaria fornita dal kernel allo spazio utente non può essere +rotta tranne che in circostanze eccezionali. L'interfaccia di programmazione +interna al kernel, invece, è estremamente fluida e può essere modificata al +bisogno. Se vi trovate a dover lavorare attorno ad un'API del kernel o +semplicemente non state utilizzando una funzionalità offerta perché questa +non rispecchia i vostri bisogni, allora questo potrebbe essere un segno che +l'API ha bisogno di essere cambiata. In qualità di sviluppatore del kernel, +hai il potere di fare questo tipo di modifica. + +Ci sono ovviamente alcuni punti da cogliere. I cambiamenti API possono essere +fatti, ma devono essere giustificati. Quindi ogni patch che porta ad una +modifica dell'API interna dovrebbe essere accompagnata da una descrizione +della modifica in sé e del perché essa è necessaria. Questo tipo di +cambiamenti dovrebbero, inoltre, essere fatti in una patch separata, invece di +essere sepolti all'interno di una patch più grande. + +L'altro punto da cogliere consiste nel fatto che uno sviluppatore che +modifica l'API deve, in generale, essere responsabile della correzione +di tutto il codice del kernel che viene rotto per via della sua modifica. +Per una funzione ampiamente usata, questo compito può condurre letteralmente +a centinaia o migliaia di modifiche, molte delle quali sono in conflitto con +il lavoro svolto da altri sviluppatori. Non c'è bisogno di dire che questo +può essere un lavoro molto grosso, quindi è meglio essere sicuri che la +motivazione sia ben solida. Notate che lo strumento Coccinelle può fornire +un aiuto con modifiche estese dell'API. + +Quando viene fatta una modifica API incompatibile, una persona dovrebbe, +quando possibile, assicurarsi che quel codice non aggiornato sia trovato +dal compilatore. Questo vi aiuterà ad essere sicuri d'avere trovato, +tutti gli usi di quell'interfaccia. Inoltre questo avviserà gli sviluppatori +di codice fuori dal kernel che c'è un cambiamento per il quale è necessario del +lavoro. Il supporto al codice fuori dal kernel non è qualcosa di cui gli +sviluppatori del kernel devono preoccuparsi, ma non dobbiamo nemmeno rendere +più difficile del necessario la vita agli sviluppatori di questo codice. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/5.Posting.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/5.Posting.rst @@ -0,0 +1,348 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/5.Posting.rst <development_posting>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_posting: + +Pubblicare modifiche +==================== + +Prima o poi arriva il momento in cui il vostro lavoro è pronto per essere +presentato alla comunità per una revisione ed eventualmente per la sua +inclusione nel ramo principale del kernel. Com'era prevedibile, +la comunità di sviluppo del kernel ha elaborato un insieme di convenzioni +e di procedure per la pubblicazione delle patch; seguirle renderà la vita +più facile a tutti quanti. Questo documento cercherà di coprire questi +argomenti con un ragionevole livello di dettaglio; più informazioni possono +essere trovare nella cartella 'Documentation', nei file +:ref:`translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>`, +:ref:`translations/it_IT/process/submitting-drivers.rst <it_submittingdrivers>`, e +:ref:`translations/it_IT/process/submit-checklist.rst <it_submitchecklist>`. + + +Quando pubblicarle +------------------ + +C'è sempre una certa resistenza nel pubblicare patch finché non sono +veramente "pronte". Per semplici patch questo non è un problema. +Ma quando il lavoro è di una certa complessità, c'è molto da guadagnare +dai riscontri che la comunità può darvi prima che completiate il lavoro. +Dovreste considerare l'idea di pubblicare un lavoro incompleto, o anche +preparare un ramo git disponibile agli sviluppatori interessati, cosicché +possano stare al passo col vostro lavoro in qualunque momento. + +Quando pubblicate del codice che non è considerato pronto per l'inclusione, +è bene che lo diciate al momento della pubblicazione. Inoltre, aggiungete +informazioni sulle cose ancora da sviluppare e sui problemi conosciuti. +Poche persone guarderanno delle patch che si sa essere fatte a metà, +ma quelli che lo faranno penseranno di potervi aiutare a condurre il vostro +sviluppo nella giusta direzione. + + +Prima di creare patch +--------------------- + +Ci sono un certo numero di cose che dovreste fare prima di considerare +l'invio delle patch alla comunità di sviluppo. Queste cose includono: + + - Verificare il codice fino al massimo che vi è consentito. Usate gli + strumenti di debug del kernel, assicuratevi che il kernel compili con + tutte le più ragionevoli combinazioni d'opzioni, usate cross-compilatori + per compilare il codice per differenti architetture, eccetera. + + - Assicuratevi che il vostro codice sia conforme alla linee guida del + kernel sullo stile del codice. + + - La vostra patch ha delle conseguenze in termini di prestazioni? + Se è così, dovreste eseguire dei *benchmark* che mostrino il loro + impatto (anche positivo); un riassunto dei risultati dovrebbe essere + incluso nella patch. + + - Siate certi d'avere i diritti per pubblicare il codice. Se questo + lavoro è stato fatto per un datore di lavoro, egli avrà dei diritti su + questo lavoro e dovrà quindi essere d'accordo alla sua pubblicazione + con una licenza GPL + +Come regola generale, pensarci un po' di più prima di inviare il codice +ripaga quasi sempre lo sforzo. + + +Preparazione di una patch +------------------------- + +La preparazione delle patch per la pubblicazione può richiedere una quantità +di lavoro significativa, ma, ripetiamolo ancora, generalmente sconsigliamo +di risparmiare tempo in questa fase, anche sul breve periodo. + +Le patch devono essere preparate per una specifica versione del kernel. +Come regola generale, una patch dovrebbe basarsi sul ramo principale attuale +così come lo si trova nei sorgenti git di Linus. Quando vi basate sul ramo +principale, cominciate da un punto di rilascio ben noto - uno stabile o +un -rc - piuttosto che creare il vostro ramo da quello principale in un punto +a caso. + +Per facilitare una revisione e una verifica più estesa, potrebbe diventare +necessaria la produzione di versioni per -mm, linux-next o i sorgenti di un +sottosistema. Basare questa patch sui suddetti sorgenti potrebbe richiedere +un lavoro significativo nella risoluzione dei conflitti e nella correzione dei +cambiamenti di API; questo potrebbe variare a seconda dell'area d'interesse +della vostra patch e da quello che succede altrove nel kernel. + +Solo le modifiche più semplici dovrebbero essere preparate come una singola +patch; tutto il resto dovrebbe essere preparato come una serie logica di +modifiche. Spezzettare le patch è un po' un'arte; alcuni sviluppatori +passano molto tempo nel capire come farlo in modo che piaccia alla comunità. +Ci sono alcune regole spannometriche, che comunque possono aiutare +considerevolmente: + + - La serie di patch che pubblicherete, quasi sicuramente, non sarà + come quella che trovate nel vostro sistema di controllo di versione. + Invece, le vostre modifiche dovranno essere considerate nella loro forma + finale, e quindi separate in parti che abbiano un senso. Gli sviluppatori + sono interessati in modifiche che siano discrete e indipendenti, non + alla strada che avete percorso per ottenerle. + + - Ogni modifica logicamente indipendente dovrebbe essere preparata come una + patch separata. Queste modifiche possono essere piccole ("aggiunto un + campo in questa struttura") o grandi (l'aggiunta di un driver nuovo, + per esempio), ma dovrebbero essere concettualmente piccole da permettere + una descrizione in una sola riga. Ogni patch dovrebbe fare modifiche + specifiche che si possano revisionare indipendentemente e di cui si possa + verificare la veridicità. + + - Giusto per riaffermare quando detto sopra: non mischiate diversi tipi di + modifiche nella stessa patch. Se una modifica corregge un baco critico + per la sicurezza, riorganizza alcune strutture, e riformatta il codice, + ci sono buone probabilità che venga ignorata e che la correzione importante + venga persa. + + - Ogni modifica dovrebbe portare ad un kernel che compila e funziona + correttamente; se la vostra serie di patch si interrompe a metà il + risultato dovrebbe essere comunque un kernel funzionante. L'applicazione + parziale di una serie di patch è uno scenario comune nel quale il + comando "git bisect" viene usato per trovare delle regressioni; se il + risultato è un kernel guasto, renderete la vita degli sviluppatori più + difficile così come quella di chi s'impegna nel nobile lavoro di + scovare i problemi. + + - Però, non strafate. Una volta uno sviluppatore pubblicò una serie di 500 + patch che modificavano un unico file - un atto che non lo rese la persona + più popolare sulla lista di discussione del kernel. Una singola patch + può essere ragionevolmente grande fintanto che contenga un singolo + cambiamento *logico*. + + - Potrebbe essere allettante l'idea di aggiungere una nuova infrastruttura + come una serie di patch, ma di lasciare questa infrastruttura inutilizzata + finché l'ultima patch della serie non abilita tutto quanto. Quando è + possibile, questo dovrebbe essere evitato; se questa serie aggiunge delle + regressioni, "bisect" indicherà quest'ultima patch come causa del + problema anche se il baco si trova altrove. Possibilmente, quando una + patch aggiunge del nuovo codice dovrebbe renderlo attivo immediatamente. + +Lavorare per creare la serie di patch perfetta potrebbe essere frustrante +perché richiede un certo tempo e soprattutto dopo che il "vero lavoro" è +già stato fatto. Quando ben fatto, comunque, è tempo ben speso. + + +Formattazione delle patch e i changelog +--------------------------------------- + +Quindi adesso avete una serie perfetta di patch pronte per la pubblicazione, +ma il lavoro non è davvero finito. Ogni patch deve essere preparata con +un messaggio che spieghi al resto del mondo, in modo chiaro e veloce, +il suo scopo. Per ottenerlo, ogni patch sarà composta dai seguenti elementi: + + - Un campo opzionale "From" col nome dell'autore della patch. Questa riga + è necessaria solo se state passando la patch di qualcun altro via email, + ma nel dubbio non fa di certo male aggiungerlo. + + - Una descrizione di una riga che spieghi cosa fa la patch. Questo + messaggio dovrebbe essere sufficiente per far comprendere al lettore lo + scopo della patch senza altre informazioni. Questo messaggio, + solitamente, presenta in testa il nome del sottosistema a cui si riferisce, + seguito dallo scopo della patch. Per esempio: + + :: + + gpio: fix build on CONFIG_GPIO_SYSFS=n + + - Una riga bianca seguita da una descrizione dettagliata della patch. + Questa descrizione può essere lunga tanto quanto serve; dovrebbe spiegare + cosa fa e perché dovrebbe essere aggiunta al kernel. + + - Una o più righe etichette, con, minimo, una riga *Signed-off-by:* + col nome dall'autore della patch. Queste etichette verranno descritte + meglio più avanti. + +Gli elementi qui sopra, assieme, formano il changelog di una patch. +Scrivere un buon changelog è cruciale ma è spesso un'arte trascurata; +vale la pena spendere qualche parola in più al riguardo. Quando scrivete +un changelog dovreste tenere ben presente che molte persone leggeranno +le vostre parole. Queste includono i manutentori di un sotto-sistema, e i +revisori che devono decidere se la patch debba essere inclusa o no, +le distribuzioni e altri manutentori che cercano di valutare se la patch +debba essere applicata su kernel più vecchi, i cacciatori di bachi che si +chiederanno se la patch è la causa di un problema che stanno cercando, +gli utenti che vogliono sapere com'è cambiato il kernel, e molti altri. +Un buon changelog fornisce le informazioni necessarie a tutte queste +persone nel modo più diretto e conciso possibile. + +A questo scopo, la riga riassuntiva dovrebbe descrivere gli effetti della +modifica e la motivazione della patch nel modo migliore possibile nonostante +il limite di una sola riga. La descrizione dettagliata può spiegare meglio +i temi e fornire maggiori informazioni. Se una patch corregge un baco, +citate, se possibile, il commit che lo introdusse (e per favore, quando +citate un commit aggiungete sia il suo identificativo che il titolo), +Se il problema è associabile ad un file di log o all' output del compilatore, +includeteli al fine d'aiutare gli altri a trovare soluzioni per lo stesso +problema. Se la modifica ha lo scopo di essere di supporto a sviluppi +successivi, ditelo. Se le API interne vengono cambiate, dettagliate queste +modifiche e come gli altri dovrebbero agire per applicarle. In generale, +più riuscirete ad entrare nei panni di tutti quelli che leggeranno il +vostro changelog, meglio sarà il changelog (e il kernel nel suo insieme). + +Non serve dirlo, un changelog dovrebbe essere il testo usato nel messaggio +di commit in un sistema di controllo di versione. Sarà seguito da: + + - La patch stessa, nel formato unificato per patch ("-u"). Usare + l'opzione "-p" assocerà alla modifica il nome della funzione alla quale + si riferisce, rendendo il risultato più facile da leggere per gli altri. + +Dovreste evitare di includere nelle patch delle modifiche per file +irrilevanti (quelli generati dal processo di generazione, per esempio, o i file +di backup del vostro editor). Il file "dontdiff" nella cartella Documentation +potrà esservi d'aiuto su questo punto; passatelo a diff con l'opzione "-X". + +Le etichette sopra menzionante sono usate per descrivere come i vari +sviluppatori sono stati associati allo sviluppo di una patch. Sono descritte +in dettaglio nel documento :ref:`translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>`; +quello che segue è un breve riassunto. Ognuna di queste righe ha il seguente +formato: + +:: + + tag: Full Name <email address> optional-other-stuff + +Le etichette in uso più comuni sono: + + - Signed-off-by: questa è la certificazione che lo sviluppatore ha il diritto + di sottomettere la patch per l'integrazione nel kernel. Questo rappresenta + il consenso verso il certificato d'origine degli sviluppatori, il testo + completo potrà essere trovato in + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>`. + Codice che non presenta una firma appropriata non potrà essere integrato. + + - Co-developed-by: indica che la patch è stata sviluppata anche da un altro + sviluppatore assieme all'autore originale. Questo è utile quando più + persone lavorano sulla stessa patch. Da notare che questa persona deve + avere anche una riga "Signed-off-by:" nella patch. + + - Acked-by: indica il consenso di un altro sviluppatore (spesso il manutentore + del codice in oggetto) all'integrazione della patch nel kernel. + + - Tested-by: menziona la persona che ha verificato la patch e l'ha trovata + funzionante. + + - Reviwed-by: menziona lo sviluppatore che ha revisionato la patch; per + maggiori dettagli leggete la dichiarazione dei revisori in + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>` + + - Reported-by: menziona l'utente che ha riportato il problema corretto da + questa patch; quest'etichetta viene usata per dare credito alle persone + che hanno verificato il codice e ci hanno fatto sapere quando le cose non + funzionavano correttamente. + + - Cc: la persona menzionata ha ricevuto una copia della patch ed ha avuto + l'opportunità di commentarla. + +State attenti ad aggiungere queste etichette alla vostra patch: solo +"Cc:" può essere aggiunta senza il permesso esplicito della persona menzionata. + +Inviare la modifica +------------------- + +Prima di inviare la vostra patch, ci sarebbero ancora un paio di cose di cui +dovreste aver cura: + + - Siete sicuri che il vostro programma di posta non corromperà le patch? + Le patch che hanno spazi bianchi in libertà o andate a capo aggiunti + dai programmi di posta non funzioneranno per chi le riceve, e spesso + non verranno nemmeno esaminate in dettaglio. Se avete un qualsiasi dubbio, + inviate la patch a voi stessi e verificate che sia integra. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/email-clients.rst <it_email_clients>` + contiene alcuni suggerimenti utili sulla configurazione dei programmi + di posta al fine di inviare patch. + + - Siete sicuri che la vostra patch non contenga sciocchi errori? Dovreste + sempre processare le patch con scripts/checkpatch.pl e correggere eventuali + problemi riportati. Per favore tenete ben presente che checkpatch.pl non è + più intelligente di voi, nonostante sia il risultato di un certa quantità di + ragionamenti su come debba essere una patch per il kernel. Se seguire + i suggerimenti di checkpatch.pl rende il codice peggiore, allora non fatelo. + +Le patch dovrebbero essere sempre inviate come testo puro. Per favore non +inviatele come allegati; questo rende molto più difficile, per i revisori, +citare parti della patch che si vogliono commentare. Invece, mettete la vostra +patch direttamente nel messaggio. + +Quando inviate le patch, è importante inviarne una copia a tutte le persone che +potrebbero esserne interessate. Al contrario di altri progetti, il kernel +incoraggia le persone a peccare nell'invio di tante copie; non presumente che +le persone interessate vedano i vostri messaggi sulla lista di discussione. +In particolare le copie dovrebbero essere inviate a: + + - I manutentori dei sottosistemi affetti della modifica. Come descritto + in precedenza, il file MAINTAINERS è il primo luogo dove cercare i nomi + di queste persone. + + - Altri sviluppatori che hanno lavorato nello stesso ambiente - specialmente + quelli che potrebbero lavorarci proprio ora. Usate git potrebbe essere + utile per vedere chi altri ha modificato i file su cui state lavorando. + + - Se state rispondendo a un rapporto su un baco, o a una richiesta di + funzionalità, includete anche gli autori di quei rapporti/richieste. + + - Inviate una copia alle liste di discussione interessate, o, se nient'altro + è adatto, alla lista linux-kernel + + - Se state correggendo un baco, pensate se la patch dovrebbe essere inclusa + nel prossimo rilascio stabile. Se è così, la lista di discussione + stable@vger.kernel.org dovrebbe riceverne una copia. Aggiungete anche + l'etichetta "Cc: stable@vger.kernel.org" nella patch stessa; questo + permetterà alla squadra *stable* di ricevere una notifica quando questa + correzione viene integrata nel ramo principale. + +Quando scegliete i destinatari della patch, è bene avere un'idea di chi +pensiate che sia colui che, eventualmente, accetterà la vostra patch e +la integrerà. Nonostante sia possibile inviare patch direttamente a +Linus Torvalds, e lasciare che sia lui ad integrarle,solitamente non è la +strada migliore da seguire. Linus è occupato, e ci sono dei manutentori di +sotto-sistema che controllano una parte specifica del kernel. Solitamente, +vorreste che siano questi manutentori ad integrare le vostre patch. Se non +c'è un chiaro manutentore, l'ultima spiaggia è spesso Andrew Morton. + +Le patch devono avere anche un buon oggetto. Il tipico formato per l'oggetto +di una patch assomiglia a questo: + +:: + + [PATCH nn/mm] subsys: one-line description of the patch + +dove "nn" è il numero ordinale della patch, "mm" è il numero totale delle patch +nella serie, e "subsys" è il nome del sottosistema interessato. Chiaramente, +nn/mm può essere omesso per una serie composta da una singola patch. + +Se avete una significative serie di patch, è prassi inviare una descrizione +introduttiva come parte zero. Tuttavia questa convenzione non è universalmente +seguita; se la usate, ricordate che le informazioni nell'introduzione non +faranno parte del changelog del kernel. Quindi per favore, assicuratevi che +ogni patch abbia un changelog completo. + +In generale, la seconda parte e quelle successive di una patch "composta" +dovrebbero essere inviate come risposta alla prima, cosicché vengano viste +come un unico *thread*. Strumenti come git e quilt hanno comandi per inviare +gruppi di patch con la struttura appropriata. Se avete una serie lunga +e state usando git, per favore state alla larga dall'opzione --chain-reply-to +per evitare di creare un annidamento eccessivo. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/6.Followthrough.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/6.Followthrough.rst @@ -0,0 +1,240 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/6.Followthrough.rst <development_followthrough>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_followthrough: + +============= +Completamento +============= + +A questo punto, avete seguito le linee guida fino a questo punto e, con +l'aggiunta delle vostre capacità ingegneristiche, avete pubblicato una serie +perfetta di patch. Uno dei più grandi errori che possono essere commessi +persino da sviluppatori kernel esperti è quello di concludere che il +lavoro sia ormai finito. In verità, la pubblicazione delle patch +simboleggia una transizione alla fase successiva del processo, con, +probabilmente, ancora un po' di lavoro da fare. + +È raro che una modifica sia così bella alla sua prima pubblicazione che non +ci sia alcuno spazio di miglioramento. Il programma di sviluppo del kernel +riconosce questo fatto e quindi, è fortemente orientato al miglioramento +del codice pubblicato. Voi, in qualità di autori del codice, dovrete +lavorare con la comunità del kernel per assicurare che il vostro codice +mantenga gli standard qualitativi richiesti. Un fallimento in questo +processo è quasi come impedire l'inclusione delle vostre patch nel +ramo principale. + +Lavorare con i revisori +======================= + +Una patch che abbia una certa rilevanza avrà ricevuto numerosi commenti +da parte di altri sviluppatori dato che avranno revisionato il codice. +Lavorare con i revisori può rivelarsi, per molti sviluppatori, la parte +più intimidatoria del processo di sviluppo del kernel. La vita può esservi +resa molto più facile se tenete presente alcuni dettagli: + + - Se avete descritto la vostra modifica correttamente, i revisori ne + comprenderanno il valore e il perché vi siete presi il disturbo di + scriverla. Ma tale valore non li tratterrà dal porvi una domanda + fondamentale: come verrà mantenuto questo codice nel kernel nei prossimi + cinque o dieci anni? Molti dei cambiamenti che potrebbero esservi + richiesti - da piccoli problemi di stile a sostanziali ristesure - + vengono dalla consapevolezza che Linux resterà in circolazione e in + continuo sviluppo ancora per diverse decadi. + + - La revisione del codice è un duro lavoro, ed è un mestiere poco + riconosciuto; le persone ricordano chi ha scritto il codice, ma meno + fama è attribuita a chi lo ha revisionato. Quindi i revisori potrebbero + divenire burberi, specialmente quando vendono i medesimi errori venire + fatti ancora e ancora. Se ricevete una revisione che vi sembra abbia + un tono arrabbiato, insultante o addirittura offensivo, resistente alla + tentazione di rispondere a tono. La revisione riguarda il codice e non + la persona, e i revisori non vi stanno attaccando personalmente. + + - Similarmente, i revisori del codice non stanno cercando di promuovere + i loro interessi a vostre spese. Gli sviluppatori del kernel spesso si + aspettano di lavorare sul kernel per anni, ma sanno che il loro datore + di lavoro può cambiare. Davvero, senza praticamente eccezioni, loro + stanno lavorando per la creazione del miglior kernel possibile; non + stanno cercando di creare un disagio ad aziende concorrenti. + +Quello che si sta cercando di dire è che, quando i revisori vi inviano degli +appunti dovete fare attenzione alle osservazioni tecniche che vi stanno +facendo. Non lasciate che il loro modo di esprimersi o il vostro orgoglio +impediscano che ciò accada. Quando avete dei suggerimenti sulla revisione, +prendetevi il tempo per comprendere cosa il revisore stia cercando di +comunicarvi. Se possibile, sistemate le cose che il revisore vi chiede di +modificare. E rispondete al revisore ringraziandolo e spiegando come +intendete fare. + +Notate che non dovete per forza essere d'accordo con ogni singola modifica +suggerita dai revisori. Se credete che il revisore non abbia compreso +il vostro codice, spiegateglielo. Se avete un'obiezione tecnica da fargli +su di una modifica suggerita, spiegatela inserendo anche la vostra soluzione +al problema. Se la vostra spiegazione ha senso, il revisore la accetterà. +Tuttavia, la vostra motivazione potrebbe non essere del tutto persuasiva, +specialmente se altri iniziano ad essere d'accordo con il revisore. +Prendetevi quindi un po' di tempo per pensare ancora alla cosa. Può risultare +facile essere accecati dalla propria soluzione al punto che non realizzate che +c'è qualcosa di fondamentalmente sbagliato o, magari, non state nemmeno +risolvendo il problema giusto. + +Andrew Morton suggerisce che ogni suggerimento di revisione che non è +presente nella modifica del codice dovrebbe essere inserito in un commento +aggiuntivo; ciò può essere d'aiuto ai futuri revisori nell'evitare domande +che sorgono al primo sguardo. + +Un errore fatale è quello di ignorare i commenti di revisione nella speranza +che se ne andranno. Non andranno via. Se pubblicherete nuovamente il +codice senza aver risposto ai commenti ricevuti, probabilmente le vostre +modifiche non andranno da nessuna parte. + +Parlando di ripubblicazione del codice: per favore tenete a mente che i +revisori non ricorderanno tutti i dettagli del codice che avete pubblicato +l'ultima volta. Quindi è sempre una buona idea quella di ricordare ai +revisori le questioni sollevate precedetemene e come le avete risolte. +I revisori non dovrebbero star lì a cercare all'interno degli archivi per +famigliarizzare con ciò che è stato detto l'ultima volta; se li aiutate +in questo senso, saranno di umore migliore quando riguarderanno il vostro +codice. + +Se invece avete cercato di far tutto correttamente ma le cose continuano +a non andar bene? Molti disaccordi di natura tecnica possono essere risolti +attraverso la discussione, ma ci sono volte dove qualcuno deve prendere +una decisione. Se credete veramente che tale decisione andrà contro di voi +ingiustamente, potete sempre tentare di rivolgervi a qualcuno più +in alto di voi. Per cose di questo genere la persona con più potere è +Andrew Morton. Andrew è una figura molto rispettata all'interno della +comunità di sviluppo del kernel; lui può spesso sbrogliare situazioni che +sembrano irrimediabilmente bloccate. Rivolgersi ad Andrew non deve essere +fatto alla leggera, e non deve essere fatto prima di aver esplorato tutte +le altre alternative. E tenete a mente, ovviamente, che nemmeno lui +potrebbe non essere d'accordo con voi. + +Cosa accade poi +=============== + +Se la modifica è ritenuta un elemento valido da essere aggiunta al kernel, +e una volta che la maggior parte degli appunti dei revisori sono stati +sistemati, il passo successivo solitamente è quello di entrare in un +sottosistema gestito da un manutentore. Come ciò avviene dipende dal +sottosistema medesimo; ogni manutentore ha il proprio modo di fare le cose. +In particolare, ci potrebbero essere diversi sorgenti - uno, magari, dedicato +alle modifiche pianificate per la finestra di fusione successiva, e un altro +per il lavoro di lungo periodo. + +Per le modifiche proposte in aree per le quali non esiste un sottosistema +preciso (modifiche di gestione della memoria, per esempio), i sorgenti di +ripiego finiscono per essere -mm. Ed anche le modifiche che riguardano +più sottosistemi possono finire in quest'ultimo. + +L'inclusione nei sorgenti di un sottosistema può comportare per una patch, +un alto livello di visibilità. Ora altri sviluppatori che stanno lavorando +in quei medesimi sorgenti avranno le vostre modifiche. I sottosistemi +solitamente riforniscono anche Linux-next, rendendo i propri contenuti +visibili all'intera comunità di sviluppo. A questo punto, ci sono buone +possibilità per voi di ricevere ulteriori commenti da un nuovo gruppo di +revisori; anche a questi commenti dovrete rispondere come avete già fatto per +gli altri. + +Ciò che potrebbe accadere a questo punto, in base alla natura della vostra +modifica, riguarda eventuali conflitti con il lavoro svolto da altri. +Nella peggiore delle situazioni, i conflitti più pesanti tra modifiche possono +concludersi con la messa a lato di alcuni dei lavori svolti cosicché le +modifiche restanti possano funzionare ed essere integrate. Altre volte, la +risoluzione dei conflitti richiederà del lavoro con altri sviluppatori e, +possibilmente, lo spostamento di alcune patch da dei sorgenti a degli altri +in modo da assicurare che tutto sia applicato in modo pulito. Questo lavoro +può rivelarsi una spina nel fianco, ma consideratevi fortunati: prima +dell'avvento dei sorgenti linux-next, questi conflitti spesso emergevano solo +durante l'apertura della finestra di integrazione e dovevano essere smaltiti +in fretta. Ora essi possono essere risolti comodamente, prima dell'apertura +della finestra. + +Un giorno, se tutto va bene, vi collegherete e vedrete che la vostra patch +è stata inserita nel ramo principale de kernel. Congratulazioni! Terminati +i festeggiamenti (nel frattempo avrete inserito il vostro nome nel file +MAINTAINERS) vale la pena ricordare una piccola cosa, ma importante: il +lavoro non è ancora finito. L'inserimento nel ramo principale porta con se +nuove sfide. + +Cominciamo con il dire che ora la visibilità della vostra modifica è +ulteriormente cresciuta. Ci potrebbe portare ad una nuova fase di +commenti dagli sviluppatori che non erano ancora a conoscenza della vostra +patch. Ignorarli potrebbe essere allettante dato che non ci sono più +dubbi sull'integrazione della modifica. Resistete a tale tentazione, dovete +mantenervi disponibili agli sviluppatori che hanno domande o suggerimenti +per voi. + +Ancora più importante: l'inclusione nel ramo principale mette il vostro +codice nelle mani di un gruppo di *tester* molto più esteso. Anche se avete +contribuito ad un driver per un hardware che non è ancora disponibile, sarete +sorpresi da quante persone inseriranno il vostro codice nei loro kernel. +E, ovviamente, dove ci sono *tester*, ci saranno anche dei rapporti su +eventuali bachi. + +La peggior specie di rapporti sono quelli che indicano delle regressioni. +Se la vostra modifica causa una regressione, avrete un gran numero di +occhi puntati su di voi; la regressione deve essere sistemata il prima +possibile. Se non vorrete o non sarete capaci di sistemarla (e nessuno +lo farà per voi), la vostra modifica sarà quasi certamente rimossa durante +la fase di stabilizzazione. Oltre alla perdita di tutto il lavoro svolto +per far si che la vostra modifica fosse inserita nel ramo principale, +l'avere una modifica rimossa a causa del fallimento nel sistemare una +regressione, potrebbe rendere più difficile per voi far accettare +il vostro lavoro in futuro. + +Dopo che ogni regressione è stata affrontata, ci potrebbero essere altri +bachi ordinari da "sconfiggere". Il periodo di stabilizzazione è la +vostra migliore opportunità per sistemare questi bachi e assicurarvi che +il debutto del vostro codice nel ramo principale del kernel sia il più solido +possibile. Quindi, per favore, rispondete ai rapporti sui bachi e ponete +rimedio, se possibile, a tutti i problemi. È a questo che serve il periodo +di stabilizzazione; potete iniziare creando nuove fantastiche modifiche +una volta che ogni problema con le vecchie sia stato risolto. + +Non dimenticate che esistono altre pietre miliari che possono generare +rapporti sui bachi: il successivo rilascio stabile, quando una distribuzione +importante usa una versione del kernel nel quale è presente la vostra +modifica, eccetera. Il continuare a rispondere a questi rapporti è fonte di +orgoglio per il vostro lavoro. Se questa non è una sufficiente motivazione, +allora, è anche consigliabile considera che la comunità di sviluppo ricorda +gli sviluppatori che hanno perso interesse per il loro codice una volta +integrato. La prossima volta che pubblicherete una patch, la comunità +la valuterà anche sulla base del fatto che non sarete disponibili a +prendervene cura anche nel futuro. + + +Altre cose che posso accadere +============================= + +Un giorno, potreste aprire la vostra email e vedere che qualcuno vi ha +inviato una patch per il vostro codice. Questo, dopo tutto, è uno dei +vantaggi di avere il vostro codice "là fuori". Se siete d'accordo con +la modifica, potrete anche inoltrarla ad un manutentore di sottosistema +(assicuratevi di includere la riga "From:" cosicché l'attribuzione sia +corretta, e aggiungete una vostra firma "Signed-off-by"), oppure inviate +un "Acked-by:" e lasciate che l'autore originale la invii. + +Se non siete d'accordo con la patch, inviate una risposta educata +spiegando il perché. Se possibile, dite all'autore quali cambiamenti +servirebbero per rendere la patch accettabile da voi. C'è una certa +riluttanza nell'inserire modifiche con un conflitto fra autore +e manutentore del codice, ma solo fino ad un certo punto. Se siete visti +come qualcuno che blocca un buon lavoro senza motivo, quelle patch vi +passeranno oltre e andranno nel ramo principale in ogni caso. Nel kernel +Linux, nessuno ha potere di veto assoluto su alcun codice. Eccezione +fatta per Linus, forse. + +In rarissime occasioni, potreste vedere qualcosa di completamente diverso: +un altro sviluppatore che pubblica una soluzione differente al vostro +problema. A questo punto, c'è una buona probabilità che una delle due +modifiche non verrà integrata, e il "c'ero prima io" non è considerato +un argomento tecnico rilevante. Se la modifica di qualcun'altro rimpiazza +la vostra ed entra nel ramo principale, esiste un unico modo di reagire: +siate contenti che il vostro problema sia stato risolto e andate avanti con +il vostro lavoro. L'avere un vostro lavoro spintonato da parte in questo +modo può essere avvilente e scoraggiante, ma la comunità ricorderà come +avrete reagito anche dopo che avrà dimenticato quale fu la modifica accettata. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/7.AdvancedTopics.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/7.AdvancedTopics.rst @@ -0,0 +1,191 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/7.AdvancedTopics.rst <development_advancedtopics>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_advancedtopics: + +Argomenti avanzati +================== + +A questo punto, si spera, dovreste avere un'idea su come funziona il processo +di sviluppo. Ma rimane comunque molto da imparare! Questo capitolo copre +alcuni argomenti che potrebbero essere utili per gli sviluppatori che stanno +per diventare parte integrante del processo di sviluppo del kernel. + +Gestire le modifiche con git +----------------------------- + +L'uso di un sistema distribuito per il controllo delle versioni del kernel +ebbe iniziò nel 2002 quando Linux iniziò a provare il programma proprietario +BitKeeper. Nonostante l'uso di BitKeeper fosse opinabile, di certo il suo +approccio alla gestione dei sorgenti non lo era. Un sistema distribuito per +il controllo delle versioni accelerò immediatamente lo sviluppo del kernel. +Oggigiorno, ci sono diverse alternative libere a BitKeeper. Per il meglio o il +peggio, il progetto del kernel ha deciso di usare git per gestire i sorgenti. + +Gestire le modifiche con git può rendere la vita dello sviluppatore molto +più facile, specialmente quando il volume delle modifiche cresce. +Git ha anche i suoi lati taglienti che possono essere pericolosi; è uno +strumento giovane e potente che è ancora in fase di civilizzazione da parte +dei suoi sviluppatori. Questo documento non ha lo scopo di insegnare l'uso +di git ai suoi lettori; ci sarebbe materiale a sufficienza per un lungo +documento al riguardo. Invece, qui ci concentriamo in particolare su come +git è parte del processo di sviluppo del kernel. Gli sviluppatori che +desiderassero diventare agili con git troveranno più informazioni ai +seguenti indirizzi: + + http://git-scm.com/ + + http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/user-manual.html + +e su varie guide che potrete trovare su internet. + +La prima cosa da fare prima di usarlo per produrre patch che saranno +disponibili ad altri, è quella di leggere i siti qui sopra e di acquisire una +base solida su come funziona git. Uno sviluppatore che sappia usare git +dovrebbe essere capace di ottenere una copia del repositorio principale, +esplorare la storia della revisione, registrare le modifiche, usare i rami, +eccetera. Una certa comprensione degli strumenti git per riscrivere la storia +(come ``rebase``) è altrettanto utile. Git ha i propri concetti e la propria +terminologia; un nuovo utente dovrebbe conoscere *refs*, *remote branch*, +*index*, *fast-forward merge*, *push* e *pull*, *detached head*, eccetera. +Il tutto potrebbe essere un po' intimidatorio visto da fuori, ma con un po' +di studio i concetti non saranno così difficili da capire. + +Utilizzare git per produrre patch da sottomettere via email può essere +un buon esercizio da fare mentre si sta prendendo confidenza con lo strumento. + +Quando sarete in grado di creare rami git che siano guardabili da altri, +vi servirà, ovviamente, un server dal quale sia possibile attingere le vostre +modifiche. Se avete un server accessibile da Internet, configurarlo per +eseguire git-daemon è relativamente semplice . Altrimenti, iniziano a +svilupparsi piattaforme che offrono spazi pubblici, e gratuiti (Github, +per esempio). Gli sviluppatori permanenti possono ottenere un account +su kernel.org, ma non è proprio facile da ottenere; per maggiori informazioni +consultate la pagina web http://kernel.org/faq/. + +In git è normale avere a che fare con tanti rami. Ogni linea di sviluppo +può essere separata in "rami per argomenti" e gestiti indipendentemente. +In git i rami sono facilissimi, per cui non c'è motivo per non usarli +in libertà. In ogni caso, non dovreste sviluppare su alcun ramo dal +quale altri potrebbero attingere. I rami disponibili pubblicamente dovrebbero +essere creati con attenzione; integrate patch dai rami di sviluppo +solo quando sono complete e pronte ad essere consegnate - non prima. + +Git offre alcuni strumenti che vi permettono di riscrivere la storia del +vostro sviluppo. Una modifica errata (diciamo, una che rompe la bisezione, +oppure che ha un qualche tipo di baco evidente) può essere corretta sul posto +o fatta sparire completamente dalla storia. Una serie di patch può essere +riscritta come se fosse stata scritta in cima al ramo principale di oggi, +anche se ci avete lavorato per mesi. Le modifiche possono essere spostate +in modo trasparente da un ramo ad un altro. E così via. Un uso giudizioso +di git per revisionare la storia può aiutare nella creazione di una serie +di patch pulite e con meno problemi. + +Un uso eccessivo può portare ad altri tipi di problemi, tuttavia, oltre +alla semplice ossessione per la creazione di una storia del progetto che sia +perfetta. Riscrivere la storia riscriverà le patch contenute in quella +storia, trasformando un kernel verificato (si spera) in uno da verificare. +Ma, oltre a questo, gli sviluppatori non possono collaborare se non condividono +la stessa vista sulla storia del progetto; se riscrivete la storia dalla quale +altri sviluppatori hanno attinto per i loro repositori, renderete la loro vita +molto più difficile. Quindi tenete conto di questa semplice regola generale: +la storia che avete esposto ad altri, generalmente, dovrebbe essere vista come +immutabile. + +Dunque, una volta che il vostro insieme di patch è stato reso disponibile +pubblicamente non dovrebbe essere più sovrascritto. Git tenterà di imporre +questa regola, e si rifiuterà di pubblicare nuove patch che non risultino +essere dirette discendenti di quelle pubblicate in precedenza (in altre parole, +patch che non condividono la stessa storia). È possibile ignorare questo +controllo, e ci saranno momenti in cui sarà davvero necessario riscrivere +un ramo già pubblicato. Un esempio è linux-next dove le patch vengono +spostate da un ramo all'altro al fine di evitare conflitti. Ma questo tipo +d'azione dovrebbe essere un'eccezione. Questo è uno dei motivi per cui lo +sviluppo dovrebbe avvenire in rami privati (che possono essere sovrascritti +quando lo si ritiene necessario) e reso pubblico solo quando è in uno stato +avanzato. + +Man mano che il ramo principale (o altri rami su cui avete basato le +modifiche) avanza, diventa allettante l'idea di integrare tutte le patch +per rimanere sempre aggiornati. Per un ramo privato, il *rebase* può essere +un modo semplice per rimanere aggiornati, ma questa non è un'opzione nel +momento in cui il vostro ramo è stato esposto al mondo intero. +*Merge* occasionali possono essere considerati di buon senso, ma quando +diventano troppo frequenti confondono inutilmente la storia. La tecnica +suggerita in questi casi è quella di fare *merge* raramente, e più in generale +solo nei momenti di rilascio (per esempio gli -rc del ramo principale). +Se siete nervosi circa alcune patch in particolare, potete sempre fare +dei *merge* di test in un ramo privato. In queste situazioni git "rerere" +può essere utile; questo strumento si ricorda come i conflitti di *merge* +furono risolti in passato cosicché non dovrete fare lo stesso lavoro due volte. + +Una delle lamentele più grosse e ricorrenti sull'uso di strumenti come git +è il grande movimento di patch da un repositorio all'altro che rende +facile l'integrazione nel ramo principale di modifiche mediocri, il tutto +sotto il naso dei revisori. Gli sviluppatori del kernel tendono ad essere +scontenti quando vedono succedere queste cose; preparare un ramo git con +patch che non hanno ricevuto alcuna revisione o completamente avulse, potrebbe +influire sulla vostra capacita di proporre, in futuro, l'integrazione dei +vostri rami. Citando Linus + +:: + + Potete inviarmi le vostre patch, ma per far si che io integri una + vostra modifica da git, devo sapere che voi sappiate cosa state + facendo, e ho bisogno di fidarmi *senza* dover passare tutte + le modifiche manualmente una per una. + +(http://lwn.net/Articles/224135/). + +Per evitare queste situazioni, assicuratevi che tutte le patch in un ramo +siano strettamente correlate al tema delle modifiche; un ramo "driver fixes" +non dovrebbe fare modifiche al codice principale per la gestione della memoria. +E, più importante ancora, non usate un repositorio git per tentare di +evitare il processo di revisione. Pubblicate un sommario di quello che il +vostro ramo contiene sulle liste di discussione più opportune, e , quando +sarà il momento, richiedete che il vostro ramo venga integrato in linux-next. + +Se e quando altri inizieranno ad inviarvi patch per essere incluse nel +vostro repositorio, non dovete dimenticare di revisionarle. Inoltre +assicuratevi di mantenerne le informazioni di paternità; al riguardo git "am" +fa del suo meglio, ma potreste dover aggiungere una riga "From:" alla patch +nel caso in cui sia arrivata per vie traverse. + +Quando richiedete l'integrazione, siate certi di fornire tutte le informazioni: +dov'è il vostro repositorio, quale ramo integrare, e quali cambiamenti si +otterranno dall'integrazione. Il comando git request-pull può essere d'aiuto; +preparerà una richiesta nel modo in cui gli altri sviluppatori se l'aspettano, +e verificherà che vi siate ricordati di pubblicare quelle patch su un +server pubblico. + +Revisionare le patch +-------------------- + +Alcuni lettori potrebbero avere obiezioni sulla presenza di questa sezione +negli "argomenti avanzati" sulla base che anche gli sviluppatori principianti +dovrebbero revisionare le patch. É certamente vero che non c'è modo +migliore di imparare come programmare per il kernel che guardare il codice +pubblicato dagli altri. In aggiunta, i revisori sono sempre troppo pochi; +guardando il codice potete apportare un significativo contributo all'intero +processo. + +Revisionare il codice potrebbe risultare intimidatorio, specialmente per i +nuovi arrivati che potrebbero sentirsi un po' nervosi nel questionare +il codice - in pubblico - pubblicato da sviluppatori più esperti. Perfino +il codice scritto dagli sviluppatori più esperti può essere migliorato. +Forse il suggerimento migliore per i revisori (tutti) è questo: formulate +i commenti come domande e non come critiche. Chiedere "Come viene rilasciato +il *lock* in questo percorso?" funziona sempre molto meglio che +"qui la sincronizzazione è sbagliata". + +Diversi sviluppatori revisioneranno il codice con diversi punti di vista. +Alcuni potrebbero concentrarsi principalmente sullo stile del codice e se +alcune linee hanno degli spazio bianchi di troppo. Altri si chiederanno +se accettare una modifica interamente è una cosa positiva per il kernel +o no. E altri ancora si focalizzeranno sui problemi di sincronizzazione, +l'uso eccessivo di *stack*, problemi di sicurezza, duplicazione del codice +in altri contesti, documentazione, effetti negativi sulle prestazioni, cambi +all'ABI dello spazio utente, eccetera. Qualunque tipo di revisione è ben +accetta e di valore, se porta ad avere un codice migliore nel kernel. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/8.Conclusion.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/8.Conclusion.rst @@ -0,0 +1,85 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/8.Conclusion.rst <development_conclusion>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_conclusion: + +Per maggiori informazioni +========================= + +Esistono numerose fonti di informazioni sullo sviluppo del kernel Linux +e argomenti correlati. Primo tra questi sarà sempre la cartella Documentation +che si trova nei sorgenti kernel. + +Il file :ref:`process/howto.rst <it_process_howto>` è un punto di partenza +importante; :ref:`process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>` e +:ref:`process/submitting-drivers.rst <it_submittingdrivers>` sono +anch'essi qualcosa che tutti gli sviluppatori del kernel dovrebbero leggere. +Molte API interne al kernel sono documentate utilizzando il meccanismo +kerneldoc; "make htmldocs" o "make pdfdocs" possono essere usati per generare +quei documenti in HTML o PDF (sebbene le versioni di TeX di alcune +distribuzioni hanno dei limiti interni e fallisce nel processare +appropriatamente i documenti). + +Diversi siti web approfondiscono lo sviluppo del kernel ad ogni livello +di dettaglio. Il vostro autore vorrebbe umilmente suggerirvi +http://lwn.net/ come fonte; usando l'indice 'kernel' su LWN troverete +molti argomenti specifici sul kernel: + + http://lwn.net/Kernel/Index/ + +Oltre a ciò, una risorsa valida per gli sviluppatori kernel è: + + http://kernelnewbies.org/ + +E, ovviamente, una fonte da non dimenticare è http://kernel.org/, il luogo +definitivo per le informazioni sui rilasci del kernel. + +Ci sono numerosi libri sullo sviluppo del kernel: + + Linux Device Drivers, 3rd Edition (Jonathan Corbet, Alessandro + Rubini, and Greg Kroah-Hartman). In linea all'indirizzo + http://lwn.net/Kernel/LDD3/. + + Linux Kernel Development (Robert Love). + + Understanding the Linux Kernel (Daniel Bovet and Marco Cesati). + +Tutti questi libri soffrono di un errore comune: tendono a risultare in un +certo senso obsoleti dal momento che si trovano in libreria da diverso +tempo. Comunque contengono informazioni abbastanza buone. + +La documentazione per git la troverete su: + + http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/ + + http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/user-manual.html + + + +Conclusioni +=========== + +Congratulazioni a chiunque ce l'abbia fatta a terminare questo documento di +lungo-respiro. Si spera che abbia fornito un'utile comprensione d'insieme +di come il kernel Linux viene sviluppato e di come potete partecipare a +tale processo. + +Infine, quello che conta è partecipare. Qualsiasi progetto software +open-source non è altro che la somma di quello che i suoi contributori +mettono al suo interno. Il kernel Linux è cresciuto velocemente e bene +perché ha ricevuto il supporto di un impressionante gruppo di sviluppatori, +ognuno dei quali sta lavorando per renderlo migliore. Il kernel è un esempio +importante di cosa può essere fatto quando migliaia di persone lavorano +insieme verso un obiettivo comune. + +Il kernel può sempre beneficiare di una larga base di sviluppatori, tuttavia, +c'è sempre molto lavoro da fare. Ma, cosa non meno importante, molti degli +altri partecipanti all'ecosistema Linux possono trarre beneficio attraverso +il contributo al kernel. Inserire codice nel ramo principale è la chiave +per arrivare ad una qualità del codice più alta, bassa manutenzione e +bassi prezzi di distribuzione, alti livelli d'influenza sulla direzione +dello sviluppo del kernel, e molto altro. È una situazione nella quale +tutti coloro che sono coinvolti vincono. Mollate il vostro editor e +raggiungeteci; sarete più che benvenuti. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/adding-syscalls.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/adding-syscalls.rst @@ -0,0 +1,643 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/adding-syscalls.rst <addsyscalls>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_addsyscalls: + +Aggiungere una nuova chiamata di sistema +======================================== + +Questo documento descrive quello che è necessario sapere per aggiungere +nuove chiamate di sistema al kernel Linux; questo è da considerarsi come +un'aggiunta ai soliti consigli su come proporre nuove modifiche +:ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>`. + + +Alternative alle chiamate di sistema +------------------------------------ + +La prima considerazione da fare quando si aggiunge una nuova chiamata di +sistema è quella di valutare le alternative. Nonostante le chiamate di sistema +siano il punto di interazione fra spazio utente e kernel più tradizionale ed +ovvio, esistono altre possibilità - scegliete quella che meglio si adatta alle +vostra interfaccia. + + - Se le operazioni coinvolte possono rassomigliare a quelle di un filesystem, + allora potrebbe avere molto più senso la creazione di un nuovo filesystem o + dispositivo. Inoltre, questo rende più facile incapsulare la nuova + funzionalità in un modulo kernel piuttosto che essere sviluppata nel cuore + del kernel. + + - Se la nuova funzionalità prevede operazioni dove il kernel notifica + lo spazio utente su un avvenimento, allora restituire un descrittore + di file all'oggetto corrispondente permette allo spazio utente di + utilizzare ``poll``/``select``/``epoll`` per ricevere quelle notifiche. + - Tuttavia, le operazioni che non si sposano bene con operazioni tipo + :manpage:`read(2)`/:manpage:`write(2)` dovrebbero essere implementate + come chiamate :manpage:`ioctl(2)`, il che potrebbe portare ad un'API in + un qualche modo opaca. + + - Se dovete esporre solo delle informazioni sul sistema, un nuovo nodo in + sysfs (vedere ``Documentation/translations/it_IT/filesystems/sysfs.txt``) o + in procfs potrebbe essere sufficiente. Tuttavia, l'accesso a questi + meccanismi richiede che il filesystem sia montato, il che potrebbe non + essere sempre vero (per esempio, in ambienti come namespace/sandbox/chroot). + Evitate d'aggiungere nuove API in debugfs perché questo non viene + considerata un'interfaccia di 'produzione' verso lo spazio utente. + - Se l'operazione è specifica ad un particolare file o descrittore, allora + potrebbe essere appropriata l'aggiunta di un comando :manpage:`fcntl(2)`. + Tuttavia, :manpage:`fcntl(2)` è una chiamata di sistema multiplatrice che + nasconde una notevole complessità, quindi è ottima solo quando la nuova + funzione assomiglia a quelle già esistenti in :manpage:`fcntl(2)`, oppure + la nuova funzionalità è veramente semplice (per esempio, leggere/scrivere + un semplice flag associato ad un descrittore di file). + - Se l'operazione è specifica ad un particolare processo, allora + potrebbe essere appropriata l'aggiunta di un comando :manpage:`prctl(2)`. + Come per :manpage:`fcntl(2)`, questa chiamata di sistema è un complesso + multiplatore quindi è meglio usarlo per cose molto simili a quelle esistenti + nel comando ``prctl`` oppure per leggere/scrivere un semplice flag relativo + al processo. + + +Progettare l'API: pianificare le estensioni +------------------------------------------- + +Una nuova chiamata di sistema diventerà parte dell'API del kernel, e +dev'essere supportata per un periodo indefinito. Per questo, è davvero +un'ottima idea quella di discutere apertamente l'interfaccia sulla lista +di discussione del kernel, ed è altrettanto importante pianificarne eventuali +estensioni future. + +(Nella tabella delle chiamate di sistema sono disseminati esempi dove questo +non fu fatto, assieme ai corrispondenti aggiornamenti - +``eventfd``/``eventfd2``, ``dup2``/``dup3``, ``inotify_init``/``inotify_init1``, +``pipe``/``pipe2``, ``renameat``/``renameat2`` --quindi imparate dalla storia +del kernel e pianificate le estensioni fin dall'inizio) + +Per semplici chiamate di sistema che accettano solo un paio di argomenti, +il modo migliore di permettere l'estensibilità è quello di includere un +argomento *flags* alla chiamata di sistema. Per assicurarsi che i programmi +dello spazio utente possano usare in sicurezza *flags* con diverse versioni +del kernel, verificate se *flags* contiene un qualsiasi valore sconosciuto, +in qual caso rifiutate la chiamata di sistema (con ``EINVAL``):: + + if (flags & ~(THING_FLAG1 | THING_FLAG2 | THING_FLAG3)) + return -EINVAL; + +(Se *flags* non viene ancora utilizzato, verificate che l'argomento sia zero) + +Per chiamate di sistema più sofisticate che coinvolgono un numero più grande di +argomenti, il modo migliore è quello di incapsularne la maggior parte in una +struttura dati che verrà passata per puntatore. Questa struttura potrà +funzionare con future estensioni includendo un campo *size*:: + + struct xyzzy_params { + u32 size; /* userspace sets p->size = sizeof(struct xyzzy_params) */ + u32 param_1; + u64 param_2; + u64 param_3; + }; + +Fintanto che un qualsiasi campo nuovo, diciamo ``param_4``, è progettato per +offrire il comportamento precedente quando vale zero, allora questo permetterà +di gestire un conflitto di versione in entrambe le direzioni: + + - un vecchio kernel può gestire l'accesso di una versione moderna di un + programma in spazio utente verificando che la memoria oltre la dimensione + della struttura dati attesa sia zero (in pratica verificare che + ``param_4 == 0``). + - un nuovo kernel può gestire l'accesso di una versione vecchia di un + programma in spazio utente estendendo la struttura dati con zeri (in pratica + ``param_4 = 0``). + +Vedere :manpage:`perf_event_open(2)` e la funzione ``perf_copy_attr()`` (in +``kernel/events/core.c``) per un esempio pratico di questo approccio. + + +Progettare l'API: altre considerazioni +-------------------------------------- + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema permette allo spazio utente di fare +riferimento ad un oggetto del kernel, allora questa dovrebbe usare un +descrittore di file per accesso all'oggetto - non inventatevi nuovi tipi di +accesso da spazio utente quando il kernel ha già dei meccanismi e una semantica +ben definita per utilizzare i descrittori di file. + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema :manpage:`xyzzy(2)` ritorna un nuovo +descrittore di file, allora l'argomento *flags* dovrebbe includere un valore +equivalente a ``O_CLOEXEC`` per i nuovi descrittori. Questo rende possibile, +nello spazio utente, la chiusura della finestra temporale fra le chiamate a +``xyzzy()`` e ``fcntl(fd, F_SETFD, FD_CLOEXEC)``, dove un inaspettato +``fork()`` o ``execve()`` potrebbe trasferire il descrittore al programma +eseguito (Comunque, resistete alla tentazione di riutilizzare il valore di +``O_CLOEXEC`` dato che è specifico dell'architettura e fa parte di una +enumerazione di flag ``O_*`` che è abbastanza ricca). + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema ritorna un nuovo descrittore di file, +dovreste considerare che significato avrà l'uso delle chiamate di sistema +della famiglia di :manpage:`poll(2)`. Rendere un descrittore di file pronto +per la lettura o la scrittura è il tipico modo del kernel per notificare lo +spazio utente circa un evento associato all'oggetto del kernel. + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema :manpage:`xyzzy(2)` ha un argomento +che è il percorso ad un file:: + + int sys_xyzzy(const char __user *path, ..., unsigned int flags); + +dovreste anche considerare se non sia più appropriata una versione +:manpage:`xyzzyat(2)`:: + + int sys_xyzzyat(int dfd, const char __user *path, ..., unsigned int flags); + +Questo permette più flessibilità su come lo spazio utente specificherà il file +in questione; in particolare, permette allo spazio utente di richiedere la +funzionalità su un descrittore di file già aperto utilizzando il *flag* +``AT_EMPTY_PATH``, in pratica otterremmo gratuitamente l'operazione +:manpage:`fxyzzy(3)`:: + + - xyzzyat(AT_FDCWD, path, ..., 0) is equivalent to xyzzy(path,...) + - xyzzyat(fd, "", ..., AT_EMPTY_PATH) is equivalent to fxyzzy(fd, ...) + +(Per maggiori dettagli sulla logica delle chiamate \*at(), leggete la pagina +man :manpage:`openat(2)`; per un esempio di AT_EMPTY_PATH, leggere la pagina +man :manpage:`fstatat(2)`). + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema :manpage:`xyzzy(2)` prevede un parametro +per descrivere uno scostamento all'interno di un file, usate ``loff_t`` come +tipo cosicché scostamenti a 64-bit potranno essere supportati anche su +architetture a 32-bit. + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema :manpage:`xyzzy(2)` prevede l'uso di +funzioni riservate, allora dev'essere gestita da un opportuno bit di privilegio +(verificato con una chiamata a ``capable()``), come descritto nella pagina man +:manpage:`capabilities(7)`. Scegliete un bit di privilegio già esistente per +gestire la funzionalità associata, ma evitate la combinazione di diverse +funzionalità vagamente collegate dietro lo stesso bit, in quanto va contro il +principio di *capabilities* di separare i poteri di root. In particolare, +evitate di aggiungere nuovi usi al fin-troppo-generico privilegio +``CAP_SYS_ADMIN``. + +Se la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema :manpage:`xyzzy(2)` manipola altri +processi oltre a quello chiamato, allora dovrebbe essere limitata (usando +la chiamata ``ptrace_may_access()``) di modo che solo un processo chiamante +con gli stessi permessi del processo in oggetto, o con i necessari privilegi, +possa manipolarlo. + +Infine, state attenti che in alcune architetture non-x86 la vita delle chiamate +di sistema con argomenti a 64-bit viene semplificata se questi argomenti +ricadono in posizioni dispari (pratica, i parametri 1, 3, 5); questo permette +l'uso di coppie contigue di registri a 32-bit. (Questo non conta se gli +argomenti sono parte di una struttura dati che viene passata per puntatore). + + +Proporre l'API +-------------- + +Al fine di rendere le nuove chiamate di sistema di facile revisione, è meglio +che dividiate le modifiche i pezzi separati. Questi dovrebbero includere +almeno le seguenti voci in *commit* distinti (ognuno dei quali sarà descritto +più avanti): + + - l'essenza dell'implementazione della chiamata di sistema, con i prototipi, + i numeri generici, le modifiche al Kconfig e l'implementazione *stub* di + ripiego. + - preparare la nuova chiamata di sistema per un'architettura specifica, + solitamente x86 (ovvero tutti: x86_64, x86_32 e x32). + - un programma di auto-verifica da mettere in ``tools/testing/selftests/`` + che mostri l'uso della chiamata di sistema. + - una bozza di pagina man per la nuova chiamata di sistema. Può essere + scritta nell'email di presentazione, oppure come modifica vera e propria + al repositorio delle pagine man. + +Le proposte di nuove chiamate di sistema, come ogni altro modifica all'API del +kernel, deve essere sottomessa alla lista di discussione +linux-api@vger.kernel.org. + + +Implementazione di chiamate di sistema generiche +------------------------------------------------ + +Il principale punto d'accesso alla vostra nuova chiamata di sistema +:manpage:`xyzzy(2)` verrà chiamato ``sys_xyzzy()``; ma, piuttosto che in modo +esplicito, lo aggiungerete tramite la macro ``SYSCALL_DEFINEn``. La 'n' +indica il numero di argomenti della chiamata di sistema; la macro ha come +argomento il nome della chiamata di sistema, seguito dalle coppie (tipo, nome) +per definire i suoi parametri. L'uso di questa macro permette di avere +i metadati della nuova chiamata di sistema disponibili anche per altri +strumenti. + +Il nuovo punto d'accesso necessita anche del suo prototipo di funzione in +``include/linux/syscalls.h``, marcato come asmlinkage di modo da abbinargli +il modo in cui quelle chiamate di sistema verranno invocate:: + + asmlinkage long sys_xyzzy(...); + +Alcune architetture (per esempio x86) hanno le loro specifiche tabelle di +chiamate di sistema (syscall), ma molte altre architetture condividono una +tabella comune di syscall. Aggiungete alla lista generica la vostra nuova +chiamata di sistema aggiungendo un nuovo elemento alla lista in +``include/uapi/asm-generic/unistd.h``:: + + #define __NR_xyzzy 292 + __SYSCALL(__NR_xyzzy, sys_xyzzy) + +Aggiornate anche il contatore __NR_syscalls di modo che sia coerente con +l'aggiunta della nuove chiamate di sistema; va notato che se più di una nuova +chiamata di sistema viene aggiunga nella stessa finestra di sviluppo, il numero +della vostra nuova syscall potrebbe essere aggiustato al fine di risolvere i +conflitti. + +Il file ``kernel/sys_ni.c`` fornisce le implementazioni *stub* di ripiego che +ritornano ``-ENOSYS``. Aggiungete la vostra nuova chiamata di sistema anche +qui:: + + COND_SYSCALL(xyzzy); + +La vostra nuova funzionalità del kernel, e la chiamata di sistema che la +controlla, dovrebbero essere opzionali. Quindi, aggiungete un'opzione +``CONFIG`` (solitamente in ``init/Kconfig``). Come al solito per le nuove +opzioni ``CONFIG``: + + - Includete una descrizione della nuova funzionalità e della chiamata di + sistema che la controlla. + - Rendete l'opzione dipendente da EXPERT se dev'essere nascosta agli utenti + normali. + - Nel Makefile, rendere tutti i nuovi file sorgenti, che implementano la + nuova funzionalità, dipendenti dall'opzione CONFIG (per esempio + ``obj-$(CONFIG_XYZZY_SYSCALL) += xyzzy.o``). + - Controllate due volte che sia possibile generare il kernel con la nuova + opzione CONFIG disabilitata. + +Per riassumere, vi serve un *commit* che includa: + + - un'opzione ``CONFIG``per la nuova funzione, normalmente in ``init/Kconfig`` + - ``SYSCALL_DEFINEn(xyzzy, ...)`` per il punto d'accesso + - il corrispondente prototipo in ``include/linux/syscalls.h`` + - un elemento nella tabella generica in ``include/uapi/asm-generic/unistd.h`` + - *stub* di ripiego in ``kernel/sys_ni.c`` + + +Implementazione delle chiamate di sistema x86 +--------------------------------------------- + +Per collegare la vostra nuova chiamate di sistema alle piattaforme x86, +dovete aggiornate la tabella principale di syscall. Assumendo che la vostra +nuova chiamata di sistema non sia particolarmente speciale (vedere sotto), +dovete aggiungere un elemento *common* (per x86_64 e x32) in +arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_64.tbl:: + + 333 common xyzzy sys_xyzzy + +e un elemento per *i386* ``arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_32.tbl``:: + + 380 i386 xyzzy sys_xyzzy + +Ancora una volta, questi numeri potrebbero essere cambiati se generano +conflitti durante la finestra di integrazione. + + +Chiamate di sistema compatibili (generico) +------------------------------------------ + +Per molte chiamate di sistema, la stessa implementazione a 64-bit può essere +invocata anche quando il programma in spazio utente è a 32-bit; anche se la +chiamata di sistema include esplicitamente un puntatore, questo viene gestito +in modo trasparente. + +Tuttavia, ci sono un paio di situazione dove diventa necessario avere un +livello di gestione della compatibilità per risolvere le differenze di +dimensioni fra 32-bit e 64-bit. + +Il primo caso è quando un kernel a 64-bit supporta anche programmi in spazio +utente a 32-bit, perciò dovrà ispezionare aree della memoria (``__user``) che +potrebbero contenere valori a 32-bit o a 64-bit. In particolar modo, questo +è necessario quando un argomento di una chiamata di sistema è: + + - un puntatore ad un puntatore + - un puntatore ad una struttura dati contenente a sua volta un puntatore + ( ad esempio ``struct iovec __user *``) + - un puntatore ad un tipo intero di dimensione variabile (``time_t``, + ``off_t``, ``long``, ...) + - un puntatore ad una struttura dati contenente un tipo intero di dimensione + variabile. + +Il secondo caso che richiede un livello di gestione della compatibilità è +quando uno degli argomenti di una chiamata a sistema è esplicitamente un tipo +a 64-bit anche su architetture a 32-bit, per esempio ``loff_t`` o ``__u64``. +In questo caso, un valore che arriva ad un kernel a 64-bit da un'applicazione +a 32-bit verrà diviso in due valori a 32-bit che dovranno essere riassemblati +in questo livello di compatibilità. + +(Da notare che non serve questo livello di compatibilità per argomenti che +sono puntatori ad un tipo esplicitamente a 64-bit; per esempio, in +:manpage:`splice(2)` l'argomento di tipo ``loff_t __user *`` non necessita +di una chiamata di sistema ``compat_``) + +La versione compatibile della nostra chiamata di sistema si chiamerà +``compat_sys_xyzzy()``, e viene aggiunta utilizzando la macro +``COMPAT_SYSCALL_DEFINEn()`` (simile a SYSCALL_DEFINEn). Questa versione +dell'implementazione è parte del kernel a 64-bit ma accetta parametri a 32-bit +che trasformerà secondo le necessità (tipicamente, la versione +``compat_sys_`` converte questi valori nello loro corrispondente a 64-bit e +può chiamare la versione ``sys_`` oppure invocare una funzione che implementa +le parti comuni). + +Il punto d'accesso *compat* deve avere il corrispondente prototipo di funzione +in ``include/linux/compat.h``, marcato come asmlinkage di modo da abbinargli +il modo in cui quelle chiamate di sistema verranno invocate:: + + asmlinkage long compat_sys_xyzzy(...); + +Se la chiamata di sistema prevede una struttura dati organizzata in modo +diverso per sistemi a 32-bit e per quelli a 64-bit, diciamo +``struct xyzzy_args``, allora il file d'intestazione +``then the include/linux/compat.h`` deve includere la sua versione +*compatibile* (``struct compat_xyzzy_args``); ogni variabile con +dimensione variabile deve avere il proprio tipo ``compat_`` corrispondente +a quello in ``struct xyzzy_args``. La funzione ``compat_sys_xyzzy()`` +può usare la struttura ``compat_`` per analizzare gli argomenti ricevuti +da una chiamata a 32-bit. + +Per esempio, se avete i seguenti campi:: + + struct xyzzy_args { + const char __user *ptr; + __kernel_long_t varying_val; + u64 fixed_val; + /* ... */ + }; + +nella struttura ``struct xyzzy_args``, allora la struttura +``struct compat_xyzzy_args`` dovrebbe avere:: + + struct compat_xyzzy_args { + compat_uptr_t ptr; + compat_long_t varying_val; + u64 fixed_val; + /* ... */ + }; + +La lista generica delle chiamate di sistema ha bisogno di essere +aggiustata al fine di permettere l'uso della versione *compatibile*; +la voce in ``include/uapi/asm-generic/unistd.h`` dovrebbero usare +``__SC_COMP`` piuttosto di ``__SYSCALL``:: + + #define __NR_xyzzy 292 + __SC_COMP(__NR_xyzzy, sys_xyzzy, compat_sys_xyzzy) + +Riassumendo, vi serve: + + - un ``COMPAT_SYSCALL_DEFINEn(xyzzy, ...)`` per il punto d'accesso + *compatibile* + - un prototipo in ``include/linux/compat.h`` + - (se necessario) una struttura di compatibilità a 32-bit in + ``include/linux/compat.h`` + - una voce ``__SC_COMP``, e non ``__SYSCALL``, in + ``include/uapi/asm-generic/unistd.h`` + +Compatibilità delle chiamate di sistema (x86) +--------------------------------------------- + +Per collegare una chiamata di sistema, su un'architettura x86, con la sua +versione *compatibile*, è necessario aggiustare la voce nella tabella +delle syscall. + +Per prima cosa, la voce in ``arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_32.tbl`` prende +un argomento aggiuntivo per indicare che un programma in spazio utente +a 32-bit, eseguito su un kernel a 64-bit, dovrebbe accedere tramite il punto +d'accesso compatibile:: + + 380 i386 xyzzy sys_xyzzy __ia32_compat_sys_xyzzy + +Secondo, dovete capire cosa dovrebbe succedere alla nuova chiamata di sistema +per la versione dell'ABI x32. Qui C'è una scelta da fare: gli argomenti +possono corrisponde alla versione a 64-bit o a quella a 32-bit. + +Se c'è un puntatore ad un puntatore, la decisione è semplice: x32 è ILP32, +quindi gli argomenti dovrebbero corrispondere a quelli a 32-bit, e la voce in +``arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_64.tbl`` sarà divisa cosicché i programmi +x32 eseguano la chiamata *compatibile*:: + + 333 64 xyzzy sys_xyzzy + ... + 555 x32 xyzzy __x32_compat_sys_xyzzy + +Se non ci sono puntatori, allora è preferibile riutilizzare la chiamata di +sistema a 64-bit per l'ABI x32 (e di conseguenza la voce in +arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_64.tbl rimane immutata). + +In ambo i casi, dovreste verificare che i tipi usati dagli argomenti +abbiano un'esatta corrispondenza da x32 (-mx32) al loro equivalente a +32-bit (-m32) o 64-bit (-m64). + + +Chiamate di sistema che ritornano altrove +----------------------------------------- + +Nella maggior parte delle chiamate di sistema, al termine della loro +esecuzione, i programmi in spazio utente riprendono esattamente dal punto +in cui si erano interrotti -- quindi dall'istruzione successiva, con lo +stesso *stack* e con la maggior parte del registri com'erano stati +lasciati prima della chiamata di sistema, e anche con la stessa memoria +virtuale. + +Tuttavia, alcune chiamata di sistema fanno le cose in modo differente. +Potrebbero ritornare ad un punto diverso (``rt_sigreturn``) o cambiare +la memoria in spazio utente (``fork``/``vfork``/``clone``) o perfino +l'architettura del programma (``execve``/``execveat``). + +Per permettere tutto ciò, l'implementazione nel kernel di questo tipo di +chiamate di sistema potrebbero dover salvare e ripristinare registri +aggiuntivi nello *stack* del kernel, permettendo così un controllo completo +su dove e come l'esecuzione dovrà continuare dopo l'esecuzione della +chiamata di sistema. + +Queste saranno specifiche per ogni architettura, ma tipicamente si definiscono +dei punti d'accesso in *assembly* per salvare/ripristinare i registri +aggiuntivi e quindi chiamare il vero punto d'accesso per la chiamata di +sistema. + +Per l'architettura x86_64, questo è implementato come un punto d'accesso +``stub_xyzzy`` in ``arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S``, e la voce nella tabella +di syscall (``arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_64.tbl``) verrà corretta di +conseguenza:: + + 333 common xyzzy stub_xyzzy + +L'equivalente per programmi a 32-bit eseguiti su un kernel a 64-bit viene +normalmente chiamato ``stub32_xyzzy`` e implementato in +``arch/x86/entry/entry_64_compat.S`` con la corrispondente voce nella tabella +di syscall ``arch/x86/entry/syscalls/syscall_32.tbl`` corretta nel +seguente modo:: + + 380 i386 xyzzy sys_xyzzy stub32_xyzzy + +Se una chiamata di sistema necessita di un livello di compatibilità (come +nella sezione precedente), allora la versione ``stub32_`` deve invocare +la versione ``compat_sys_`` piuttosto che quella nativa a 64-bit. In aggiunta, +se l'implementazione dell'ABI x32 è diversa da quella x86_64, allora la sua +voce nella tabella di syscall dovrà chiamare uno *stub* che invoca la versione +``compat_sys_``, + +Per completezza, sarebbe carino impostare una mappatura cosicché +*user-mode* Linux (UML) continui a funzionare -- la sua tabella di syscall +farà riferimento a stub_xyzzy, ma UML non include l'implementazione +in ``arch/x86/entry/entry_64.S`` (perché UML simula i registri eccetera). +Correggerlo è semplice, basta aggiungere una #define in +``arch/x86/um/sys_call_table_64.c``:: + + #define stub_xyzzy sys_xyzzy + + +Altri dettagli +-------------- + +La maggior parte dei kernel tratta le chiamate di sistema allo stesso modo, +ma possono esserci rare eccezioni per le quali potrebbe essere necessario +l'aggiornamento della vostra chiamata di sistema. + +Il sotto-sistema di controllo (*audit subsystem*) è uno di questi casi +speciali; esso include (per architettura) funzioni che classificano alcuni +tipi di chiamate di sistema -- in particolare apertura dei file +(``open``/``openat``), esecuzione dei programmi (``execve``/``exeveat``) +oppure multiplatori di socket (``socketcall``). Se la vostra nuova chiamata +di sistema è simile ad una di queste, allora il sistema di controllo dovrebbe +essere aggiornato. + +Più in generale, se esiste una chiamata di sistema che è simile alla vostra, +vale la pena fare una ricerca con ``grep`` su tutto il kernel per la chiamata +di sistema esistente per verificare che non ci siano altri casi speciali. + + +Verifica +-------- + +Una nuova chiamata di sistema dev'essere, ovviamente, provata; è utile fornire +ai revisori un programma in spazio utente che mostri l'uso della chiamata di +sistema. Un buon modo per combinare queste cose è quello di aggiungere un +semplice programma di auto-verifica in una nuova cartella in +``tools/testing/selftests/``. + +Per una nuova chiamata di sistema, ovviamente, non ci sarà alcuna funzione +in libc e quindi il programma di verifica dovrà invocarla usando ``syscall()``; +inoltre, se la nuova chiamata di sistema prevede un nuova struttura dati +visibile in spazio utente, il file d'intestazione necessario dev'essere +installato al fine di compilare il programma. + +Assicuratevi che il programma di auto-verifica possa essere eseguito +correttamente su tutte le architetture supportate. Per esempio, verificate che +funzioni quando viene compilato per x86_64 (-m64), x86_32 (-m32) e x32 (-mx32). + +Al fine di una più meticolosa ed estesa verifica della nuova funzionalità, +dovreste considerare l'aggiunta di nuove verifica al progetto 'Linux Test', +oppure al progetto xfstests per cambiamenti relativi al filesystem. + + - https://linux-test-project.github.io/ + - git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/fs/xfs/xfstests-dev.git + + +Pagine man +---------- + +Tutte le nuove chiamate di sistema dovrebbero avere una pagina man completa, +idealmente usando i marcatori groff, ma anche il puro testo può andare. Se +state usando groff, è utile che includiate nella email di presentazione una +versione già convertita in formato ASCII: semplificherà la vita dei revisori. + +Le pagine man dovrebbero essere in copia-conoscenza verso +linux-man@vger.kernel.org +Per maggiori dettagli, leggere +https://www.kernel.org/doc/man-pages/patches.html + + +Non invocate chiamate di sistema dal kernel +------------------------------------------- + +Le chiamate di sistema sono, come già detto prima, punti di interazione fra +lo spazio utente e il kernel. Perciò, le chiamate di sistema come +``sys_xyzzy()`` o ``compat_sys_xyzzy()`` dovrebbero essere chiamate solo dallo +spazio utente attraverso la tabella syscall, ma non da nessun altro punto nel +kernel. Se la nuova funzionalità è utile all'interno del kernel, per esempio +dev'essere condivisa fra una vecchia e una nuova chiamata di sistema o +dev'essere utilizzata da una chiamata di sistema e la sua variante compatibile, +allora dev'essere implementata come una funzione di supporto +(*helper function*) (per esempio ``kern_xyzzy()``). Questa funzione potrà +essere chiamata dallo *stub* (``sys_xyzzy()``), dalla variante compatibile +(``compat_sys_xyzzy()``), e/o da altri parti del kernel. + +Sui sistemi x86 a 64-bit, a partire dalla versione v4.17 è un requisito +fondamentale quello di non invocare chiamate di sistema all'interno del kernel. +Esso usa una diversa convenzione per l'invocazione di chiamate di sistema dove +``struct pt_regs`` viene decodificata al volo in una funzione che racchiude +la chiamata di sistema la quale verrà eseguita successivamente. +Questo significa che verranno passati solo i parametri che sono davvero +necessari ad una specifica chiamata di sistema, invece che riempire ogni volta +6 registri del processore con contenuti presi dallo spazio utente (potrebbe +causare seri problemi nella sequenza di chiamate). + +Inoltre, le regole su come i dati possano essere usati potrebbero differire +fra il kernel e l'utente. Questo è un altro motivo per cui invocare +``sys_xyzzy()`` è generalmente una brutta idea. + +Eccezioni a questa regola vengono accettate solo per funzioni d'architetture +che surclassano quelle generiche, per funzioni d'architettura di compatibilità, +o per altro codice in arch/ + + +Riferimenti e fonti +------------------- + + - Articolo di Michael Kerris su LWN sull'uso dell'argomento flags nelle + chiamate di sistema: https://lwn.net/Articles/585415/ + - Articolo di Michael Kerris su LWN su come gestire flag sconosciuti in + una chiamata di sistema: https://lwn.net/Articles/588444/ + - Articolo di Jake Edge su LWN che descrive i limiti degli argomenti a 64-bit + delle chiamate di sistema: https://lwn.net/Articles/311630/ + - Una coppia di articoli di David Drysdale che descrivono i dettagli del + percorso implementativo di una chiamata di sistema per la versione v3.14: + + - https://lwn.net/Articles/604287/ + - https://lwn.net/Articles/604515/ + + - Requisiti specifici alle architetture sono discussi nella pagina man + :manpage:`syscall(2)` : + http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/syscall.2.html#NOTES + - Collezione di email di Linux Torvalds sui problemi relativi a ``ioctl()``: + http://yarchive.net/comp/linux/ioctl.html + - "Come non inventare interfacce del kernel", Arnd Bergmann, + http://www.ukuug.org/events/linux2007/2007/papers/Bergmann.pdf + - Articolo di Michael Kerris su LWN sull'evitare nuovi usi di CAP_SYS_ADMIN: + https://lwn.net/Articles/486306/ + - Raccomandazioni da Andrew Morton circa il fatto che tutte le informazioni + su una nuova chiamata di sistema dovrebbero essere contenute nello stesso + filone di discussione di email: https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/7/24/641 + - Raccomandazioni da Michael Kerrisk circa il fatto che le nuove chiamate di + sistema dovrebbero avere una pagina man: https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/6/13/309 + - Consigli da Thomas Gleixner sul fatto che il collegamento all'architettura + x86 dovrebbe avvenire in un *commit* differente: + https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/11/19/254 + - Consigli da Greg Kroah-Hartman circa la bontà d'avere una pagina man e un + programma di auto-verifica per le nuove chiamate di sistema: + https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/3/19/710 + - Discussione di Michael Kerrisk sulle nuove chiamate di sistema contro + le estensioni :manpage:`prctl(2)`: https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/6/3/411 + - Consigli da Ingo Molnar che le chiamate di sistema con più argomenti + dovrebbero incapsularli in una struttura che includa un argomento + *size* per garantire l'estensibilità futura: + https://lkml.org/lkml/2015/7/30/117 + - Un certo numero di casi strani emersi dall'uso (riuso) dei flag O_*: + + - commit 75069f2b5bfb ("vfs: renumber FMODE_NONOTIFY and add to uniqueness + check") + - commit 12ed2e36c98a ("fanotify: FMODE_NONOTIFY and __O_SYNC in sparc + conflict") + - commit bb458c644a59 ("Safer ABI for O_TMPFILE") + + - Discussion from Matthew Wilcox about restrictions on 64-bit arguments: + https://lkml.org/lkml/2008/12/12/187 + - Raccomandazioni da Greg Kroah-Hartman sul fatto che i flag sconosciuti dovrebbero + essere controllati: https://lkml.org/lkml/2014/7/17/577 + - Raccomandazioni da Linus Torvalds che le chiamate di sistema x32 dovrebbero + favorire la compatibilità con le versioni a 64-bit piuttosto che quelle a 32-bit: + https://lkml.org/lkml/2011/8/31/244 diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/applying-patches.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/applying-patches.rst @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/applying-patches.rst <applying_patches>` + + +.. _it_applying_patches: + +Applicare modifiche al kernel Linux +=================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/changes.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/changes.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/changes.rst <changes>` + +.. _it_changes: + +Requisiti minimi per compilare il kernel +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/clang-format.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/clang-format.rst @@ -0,0 +1,197 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/clang-format.rst <clangformat>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_clangformat: + +clang-format +============ +``clang-format`` è uno strumento per formattare codice C/C++/... secondo +un gruppo di regole ed euristiche. Come tutti gli strumenti, non è perfetto +e non copre tutti i singoli casi, ma è abbastanza buono per essere utile. + +``clang-format`` può essere usato per diversi fini: + + - Per riformattare rapidamente un blocco di codice secondo lo stile del + kernel. Particolarmente utile quando si sposta del codice e lo si + allinea/ordina. Vedere it_clangformatreformat_. + + - Identificare errori di stile, refusi e possibili miglioramenti nei + file che mantieni, le modifiche che revisioni, le differenze, + eccetera. Vedere it_clangformatreview_. + + - Ti aiuta a seguire lo stile del codice, particolarmente utile per i + nuovi arrivati o per coloro che lavorano allo stesso tempo su diversi + progetti con stili di codifica differenti. + +Il suo file di configurazione è ``.clang-format`` e si trova nella cartella +principale dei sorgenti del kernel. Le regole scritte in quel file tentano +di approssimare le lo stile di codifica del kernel. Si tenta anche di seguire +il più possibile +:ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/coding-style.rst <it_codingstyle>`. +Dato che non tutto il kernel segue lo stesso stile, potreste voler aggiustare +le regole di base per un particolare sottosistema o cartella. Per farlo, +potete sovrascriverle scrivendole in un altro file ``.clang-format`` in +una sottocartella. + +Questo strumento è già stato incluso da molto tempo nelle distribuzioni +Linux più popolari. Cercate ``clang-format`` nel vostro repositorio. +Altrimenti, potete scaricare una versione pre-generata dei binari di LLVM/clang +oppure generarlo dai codici sorgenti: + + http://releases.llvm.org/download.html + +Troverete più informazioni ai seguenti indirizzi: + + https://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormat.html + + https://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormatStyleOptions.html + + +.. _it_clangformatreview: + +Revisionare lo stile di codifica per file e modifiche +----------------------------------------------------- + +Eseguendo questo programma, potrete revisionare un intero sottosistema, +cartella o singoli file alla ricerca di errori di stile, refusi o +miglioramenti. + +Per farlo, potete eseguire qualcosa del genere:: + + # Make sure your working directory is clean! + clang-format -i kernel/*.[ch] + +E poi date un'occhiata a *git diff*. + +Osservare le righe di questo diff è utile a migliorare/aggiustare +le opzioni di stile nel file di configurazione; così come per verificare +le nuove funzionalità/versioni di ``clang-format``. + +``clang-format`` è in grado di leggere diversi diff unificati, quindi +potrete revisionare facilmente delle modifiche e *git diff*. +La documentazione si trova al seguente indirizzo: + + https://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormat.html#script-for-patch-reformatting + +Per evitare che ``clang-format`` formatti alcune parti di un file, potete +scrivere nel codice:: + + int formatted_code; + // clang-format off + void unformatted_code ; + // clang-format on + void formatted_code_again; + +Nonostante si attraente l'idea di utilizzarlo per mantenere un file +sempre in sintonia con ``clang-format``, specialmente per file nuovi o +se siete un manutentore, ricordatevi che altre persone potrebbero usare +una versione diversa di ``clang-format`` oppure non utilizzarlo del tutto. +Quindi, dovreste trattenervi dall'usare questi marcatori nel codice del +kernel; almeno finché non vediamo che ``clang-format`` è diventato largamente +utilizzato. + + +.. _it_clangformatreformat: + +Riformattare blocchi di codice +------------------------------ + +Utilizzando dei plugin per il vostro editor, potete riformattare una +blocco (selezione) di codice con una singola combinazione di tasti. +Questo è particolarmente utile: quando si riorganizza il codice, per codice +complesso, macro multi-riga (e allineare le loro "barre"), eccetera. + +Ricordatevi che potete sempre aggiustare le modifiche in quei casi dove +questo strumento non ha fatto un buon lavoro. Ma come prima approssimazione, +può essere davvero molto utile. + +Questo programma si integra con molti dei più popolari editor. Alcuni di +essi come vim, emacs, BBEdit, Visaul Studio, lo supportano direttamente. +Al seguente indirizzo troverete le istruzioni: + + https://clang.llvm.org/docs/ClangFormat.html + +Per Atom, Eclipse, Sublime Text, Visual Studio Code, XCode e altri editor +e IDEs dovreste essere in grado di trovare dei plugin pronti all'uso. + +Per questo caso d'uso, considerate l'uso di un secondo ``.clang-format`` +che potete personalizzare con le vostre opzioni. +Consultare it_clangformatextra_. + + +.. _it_clangformatmissing: + +Cose non supportate +------------------- + +``clang-format`` non ha il supporto per alcune cose che sono comuni nel +codice del kernel. Sono facili da ricordare; quindi, se lo usate +regolarmente, imparerete rapidamente a evitare/ignorare certi problemi. + +In particolare, quelli più comuni che noterete sono: + + - Allineamento di ``#define`` su una singola riga, per esempio:: + + #define TRACING_MAP_BITS_DEFAULT 11 + #define TRACING_MAP_BITS_MAX 17 + #define TRACING_MAP_BITS_MIN 7 + + contro:: + + #define TRACING_MAP_BITS_DEFAULT 11 + #define TRACING_MAP_BITS_MAX 17 + #define TRACING_MAP_BITS_MIN 7 + + - Allineamento dei valori iniziali, per esempio:: + + static const struct file_operations uprobe_events_ops = { + .owner = THIS_MODULE, + .open = probes_open, + .read = seq_read, + .llseek = seq_lseek, + .release = seq_release, + .write = probes_write, + }; + + contro:: + + static const struct file_operations uprobe_events_ops = { + .owner = THIS_MODULE, + .open = probes_open, + .read = seq_read, + .llseek = seq_lseek, + .release = seq_release, + .write = probes_write, + }; + + +.. _it_clangformatextra: + +Funzionalità e opzioni aggiuntive +--------------------------------- + +Al fine di minimizzare le differenze fra il codice attuale e l'output +del programma, alcune opzioni di stile e funzionalità non sono abilitate +nella configurazione base. In altre parole, lo scopo è di rendere le +differenze le più piccole possibili, permettendo la semplificazione +della revisione di file, differenze e modifiche. + +In altri casi (per esempio un particolare sottosistema/cartella/file), lo +stile del kernel potrebbe essere diverso e abilitare alcune di queste +opzioni potrebbe dare risultati migliori. + +Per esempio: + + - Allineare assegnamenti (``AlignConsecutiveAssignments``). + + - Allineare dichiarazioni (``AlignConsecutiveDeclarations``). + + - Riorganizzare il testo nei commenti (``ReflowComments``). + + - Ordinare gli ``#include`` (``SortIncludes``). + +Piuttosto che per interi file, solitamente sono utili per la riformattazione +di singoli blocchi. In alternativa, potete creare un altro file +``.clang-format`` da utilizzare con il vostro editor/IDE. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/code-of-conduct.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/code-of-conduct.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/code-of-conduct.rst <code_of_conduct>` + +.. _it_code_of_conduct: + +Accordo dei contributori sul codice di condotta ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/coding-style.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/coding-style.rst @@ -0,0 +1,1094 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/coding-style.rst <codingstyle>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_codingstyle: + +Stile del codice per il kernel Linux +==================================== + +Questo è un breve documento che descrive lo stile di codice preferito per +il kernel Linux. Lo stile di codifica è molto personale e non voglio +**forzare** nessuno ad accettare il mio, ma questo stile è quello che +dev'essere usato per qualsiasi cosa che io sia in grado di mantenere, e l'ho +preferito anche per molte altre cose. Per favore, almeno tenete in +considerazione le osservazioni espresse qui. + +La prima cosa che suggerisco è quella di stamparsi una copia degli standard +di codifica GNU e di NON leggerla. Bruciatela, è un grande gesto simbolico. + +Comunque, ecco i punti: + +1) Indentazione +--------------- + +La tabulazione (tab) è di 8 caratteri e così anche le indentazioni. Ci sono +alcuni movimenti di eretici che vorrebbero l'indentazione a 4 (o perfino 2!) +caratteri di profondità, che è simile al tentativo di definire il valore del +pi-greco a 3. + +Motivazione: l'idea dell'indentazione è di definire chiaramente dove un blocco +di controllo inizia e finisce. Specialmente quando siete rimasti a guardare lo +schermo per 20 ore a file, troverete molto più facile capire i livelli di +indentazione se questi sono larghi. + +Ora, alcuni rivendicano che un'indentazione da 8 caratteri sposta il codice +troppo a destra e che quindi rende difficile la lettura su schermi a 80 +caratteri. La risposta a questa affermazione è che se vi servono più di 3 +livelli di indentazione, siete comunque fregati e dovreste correggere il vostro +programma. + +In breve, l'indentazione ad 8 caratteri rende più facile la lettura, e in +aggiunta vi avvisa quando state annidando troppo le vostre funzioni. +Tenete ben a mente questo avviso. + +Al fine di facilitare l'indentazione del costrutto switch, si preferisce +allineare sulla stessa colonna la parola chiave ``switch`` e i suoi +subordinati ``case``. In questo modo si evita una doppia indentazione per +i ``case``. Un esempio.: + +.. code-block:: c + + switch (suffix) { + case 'G': + case 'g': + mem <<= 30; + break; + case 'M': + case 'm': + mem <<= 20; + break; + case 'K': + case 'k': + mem <<= 10; + /* fall through */ + default: + break; + } + +A meno che non vogliate nascondere qualcosa, non mettete più istruzioni sulla +stessa riga: + +.. code-block:: c + + if (condition) do_this; + do_something_everytime; + +né mettete più assegnamenti sulla stessa riga. Lo stile del kernel +è ultrasemplice. Evitate espressioni intricate. + +Al di fuori dei commenti, della documentazione ed escludendo i Kconfig, gli +spazi non vengono mai usati per l'indentazione, e l'esempio qui sopra è +volutamente errato. + +Procuratevi un buon editor di testo e non lasciate spazi bianchi alla fine +delle righe. + + +2) Spezzare righe lunghe e stringhe +----------------------------------- + +Lo stile del codice riguarda la leggibilità e la manutenibilità utilizzando +strumenti comuni. + +Il limite delle righe è di 80 colonne e questo e un limite fortemente +desiderato. + +Espressioni più lunghe di 80 colonne saranno spezzettate in pezzi più piccoli, +a meno che eccedere le 80 colonne non aiuti ad aumentare la leggibilità senza +nascondere informazioni. I pezzi derivati sono sostanzialmente più corti degli +originali e vengono posizionati più a destra. Lo stesso si applica, nei file +d'intestazione, alle funzioni con una lista di argomenti molto lunga. Tuttavia, +non spezzettate mai le stringhe visibili agli utenti come i messaggi di +printk, questo perché inibireste la possibilità d'utilizzare grep per cercarle. + +3) Posizionamento di parentesi graffe e spazi +--------------------------------------------- + +Un altro problema che s'affronta sempre quando si parla di stile in C è +il posizionamento delle parentesi graffe. Al contrario della dimensione +dell'indentazione, non ci sono motivi tecnici sulla base dei quali scegliere +una strategia di posizionamento o un'altra; ma il modo qui preferito, +come mostratoci dai profeti Kernighan e Ritchie, è quello di +posizionare la parentesi graffa di apertura per ultima sulla riga, e quella +di chiusura per prima su una nuova riga, così: + +.. code-block:: c + + if (x is true) { + we do y + } + +Questo è valido per tutte le espressioni che non siano funzioni (if, switch, +for, while, do). Per esempio: + +.. code-block:: c + + switch (action) { + case KOBJ_ADD: + return "add"; + case KOBJ_REMOVE: + return "remove"; + case KOBJ_CHANGE: + return "change"; + default: + return NULL; + } + +Tuttavia, c'è il caso speciale, le funzioni: queste hanno la parentesi graffa +di apertura all'inizio della riga successiva, quindi: + +.. code-block:: c + + int function(int x) + { + body of function + } + +Eretici da tutto il mondo affermano che questa incoerenza è ... +insomma ... incoerente, ma tutte le persone ragionevoli sanno che (a) +K&R hanno **ragione** e (b) K&R hanno ragione. A parte questo, le funzioni +sono comunque speciali (non potete annidarle in C). + +Notate che la graffa di chiusura è da sola su una riga propria, ad +**eccezione** di quei casi dove è seguita dalla continuazione della stessa +espressione, in pratica ``while`` nell'espressione do-while, oppure ``else`` +nell'espressione if-else, come questo: + +.. code-block:: c + + do { + body of do-loop + } while (condition); + +e + +.. code-block:: c + + if (x == y) { + .. + } else if (x > y) { + ... + } else { + .... + } + +Motivazione: K&R. + +Inoltre, notate che questo posizionamento delle graffe minimizza il numero +di righe vuote senza perdere di leggibilità. In questo modo, dato che le +righe sul vostro schermo non sono una risorsa illimitata (pensate ad uno +terminale con 25 righe), avrete delle righe vuote da riempire con dei +commenti. + +Non usate inutilmente le graffe dove una singola espressione è sufficiente. + +.. code-block:: c + + if (condition) + action(); + +e + +.. code-block:: none + + if (condition) + do_this(); + else + do_that(); + +Questo non vale nel caso in cui solo un ramo dell'espressione if-else +contiene una sola espressione; in quest'ultimo caso usate le graffe per +entrambe i rami: + +.. code-block:: c + + if (condition) { + do_this(); + do_that(); + } else { + otherwise(); + } + +Inoltre, usate le graffe se un ciclo contiene più di una semplice istruzione: + +.. code-block:: c + + while (condition) { + if (test) + do_something(); + } + +3.1) Spazi +********** + +Lo stile del kernel Linux per quanto riguarda gli spazi, dipende +(principalmente) dalle funzioni e dalle parole chiave. Usate una spazio dopo +(quasi tutte) le parole chiave. L'eccezioni più evidenti sono sizeof, typeof, +alignof, e __attribute__, il cui aspetto è molto simile a quello delle +funzioni (e in Linux, solitamente, sono usate con le parentesi, anche se il +linguaggio non lo richiede; come ``sizeof info`` dopo aver dichiarato +``struct fileinfo info``). + +Quindi utilizzate uno spazio dopo le seguenti parole chiave:: + + if, switch, case, for, do, while + +ma non con sizeof, typeof, alignof, o __attribute__. Ad esempio, + +.. code-block:: c + + + s = sizeof(struct file); + +Non aggiungete spazi attorno (dentro) ad un'espressione fra parentesi. Questo +esempio è **brutto**: + +.. code-block:: c + + + s = sizeof( struct file ); + +Quando dichiarate un puntatore ad una variabile o una funzione che ritorna un +puntatore, il posto suggerito per l'asterisco ``*`` è adiacente al nome della +variabile o della funzione, e non adiacente al nome del tipo. Esempi: + +.. code-block:: c + + + char *linux_banner; + unsigned long long memparse(char *ptr, char **retptr); + char *match_strdup(substring_t *s); + +Usate uno spazio attorno (da ogni parte) alla maggior parte degli operatori +binari o ternari, come i seguenti:: + + = + - < > * / % | & ^ <= >= == != ? : + +ma non mettete spazi dopo gli operatori unari:: + + & * + - ~ ! sizeof typeof alignof __attribute__ defined + +nessuno spazio dopo l'operatore unario suffisso di incremento o decremento:: + + ++ -- + +nessuno spazio dopo l'operatore unario prefisso di incremento o decremento:: + + ++ -- + +e nessuno spazio attorno agli operatori dei membri di una struttura ``.`` e +``->``. + +Non lasciate spazi bianchi alla fine delle righe. Alcuni editor con +l'indentazione ``furba`` inseriranno gli spazi bianchi all'inizio di una nuova +riga in modo appropriato, quindi potrete scrivere la riga di codice successiva +immediatamente. Tuttavia, alcuni di questi stessi editor non rimuovono +questi spazi bianchi quando non scrivete nulla sulla nuova riga, ad esempio +perché volete lasciare una riga vuota. Il risultato è che finirete per avere +delle righe che contengono spazi bianchi in coda. + +Git vi avviserà delle modifiche che aggiungono questi spazi vuoti di fine riga, +e può opzionalmente rimuoverli per conto vostro; tuttavia, se state applicando +una serie di modifiche, questo potrebbe far fallire delle modifiche successive +perché il contesto delle righe verrà cambiato. + +4) Assegnare nomi +----------------- + +C è un linguaggio spartano, e così dovrebbero esserlo i vostri nomi. Al +contrario dei programmatori Modula-2 o Pascal, i programmatori C non usano +nomi graziosi come ThisVariableIsATemporaryCounter. Un programmatore C +chiamerebbe questa variabile ``tmp``, che è molto più facile da scrivere e +non è una delle più difficili da capire. + +TUTTAVIA, nonostante i nomi con notazione mista siano da condannare, i nomi +descrittivi per variabili globali sono un dovere. Chiamare una funzione +globale ``pippo`` è un insulto. + +Le variabili GLOBALI (da usare solo se vi servono **davvero**) devono avere +dei nomi descrittivi, così come le funzioni globali. Se avete una funzione +che conta gli utenti attivi, dovreste chiamarla ``count_active_users()`` o +qualcosa di simile, **non** dovreste chiamarla ``cntusr()``. + +Codificare il tipo di funzione nel suo nome (quella cosa chiamata notazione +ungherese) fa male al cervello - il compilatore conosce comunque il tipo e +può verificarli, e inoltre confonde i programmatori. Non c'è da +sorprendersi che MicroSoft faccia programmi bacati. + +Le variabili LOCALI dovrebbero avere nomi corti, e significativi. Se avete +un qualsiasi contatore di ciclo, probabilmente sarà chiamato ``i``. +Chiamarlo ``loop_counter`` non è produttivo, non ci sono possibilità che +``i`` possa non essere capito. Analogamente, ``tmp`` può essere una qualsiasi +variabile che viene usata per salvare temporaneamente un valore. + +Se avete paura di fare casino coi nomi delle vostre variabili locali, allora +avete un altro problema che è chiamato sindrome dello squilibrio dell'ormone +della crescita delle funzioni. Vedere il capitolo 6 (funzioni). + +5) Definizione di tipi (typedef) +-------------------------------- + +Per favore non usate cose come ``vps_t``. +Usare il typedef per strutture e puntatori è uno **sbaglio**. Quando vedete: + +.. code-block:: c + + vps_t a; + +nei sorgenti, cosa significa? +Se, invece, dicesse: + +.. code-block:: c + + struct virtual_container *a; + +potreste dire cos'è effettivamente ``a``. + +Molte persone pensano che la definizione dei tipi ``migliori la leggibilità``. +Non molto. Sono utili per: + + (a) gli oggetti completamente opachi (dove typedef viene proprio usato allo + scopo di **nascondere** cosa sia davvero l'oggetto). + + Esempio: ``pte_t`` eccetera sono oggetti opachi che potete usare solamente + con le loro funzioni accessorie. + + .. note:: + Gli oggetti opachi e le ``funzioni accessorie`` non sono, di per se, + una bella cosa. Il motivo per cui abbiamo cose come pte_t eccetera è + che davvero non c'è alcuna informazione portabile. + + (b) i tipi chiaramente interi, dove l'astrazione **aiuta** ad evitare + confusione sul fatto che siano ``int`` oppure ``long``. + + u8/u16/u32 sono typedef perfettamente accettabili, anche se ricadono + nella categoria (d) piuttosto che in questa. + + .. note:: + + Ancora - dev'esserci una **ragione** per farlo. Se qualcosa è + ``unsigned long``, non c'è alcun bisogno di avere: + + typedef unsigned long myfalgs_t; + + ma se ci sono chiare circostanze in cui potrebbe essere ``unsigned int`` + e in altre configurazioni ``unsigned long``, allora certamente typedef + è una buona scelta. + + (c) quando di rado create letteralmente dei **nuovi** tipi su cui effettuare + verifiche. + + (d) circostanze eccezionali, in cui si definiscono nuovi tipi identici a + quelli definiti dallo standard C99. + + Nonostante ci voglia poco tempo per abituare occhi e cervello all'uso dei + tipi standard come ``uint32_t``, alcune persone ne obiettano l'uso. + + Perciò, i tipi specifici di Linux ``u8/u16/u32/u64`` e i loro equivalenti + con segno, identici ai tipi standard, sono permessi- tuttavia, non sono + obbligatori per il nuovo codice. + + (e) i tipi sicuri nella spazio utente. + + In alcune strutture dati visibili dallo spazio utente non possiamo + richiedere l'uso dei tipi C99 e nemmeno i vari ``u32`` descritti prima. + Perciò, utilizziamo __u32 e tipi simili in tutte le strutture dati + condivise con lo spazio utente. + +Magari ci sono altri casi validi, ma la regola di base dovrebbe essere di +non usare MAI MAI un typedef a meno che non rientri in una delle regole +descritte qui. + +In generale, un puntatore, o una struttura a cui si ha accesso diretto in +modo ragionevole, non dovrebbero **mai** essere definite con un typedef. + +6) Funzioni +----------- + +Le funzioni dovrebbero essere brevi e carine, e fare una cosa sola. Dovrebbero +occupare uno o due schermi di testo (come tutti sappiamo, la dimensione +di uno schermo secondo ISO/ANSI è di 80x24), e fare una cosa sola e bene. + +La massima lunghezza di una funziona è inversamente proporzionale alla sua +complessità e al livello di indentazione di quella funzione. Quindi, se avete +una funzione che è concettualmente semplice ma che è implementata come un +lunga (ma semplice) sequenza di caso-istruzione, dove avete molte piccole cose +per molti casi differenti, allora va bene avere funzioni più lunghe. + +Comunque, se avete una funzione complessa e sospettate che uno studente +non particolarmente dotato del primo anno delle scuole superiori potrebbe +non capire cosa faccia la funzione, allora dovreste attenervi strettamente ai +limiti. Usate funzioni di supporto con nomi descrittivi (potete chiedere al +compilatore di renderle inline se credete che sia necessario per le +prestazioni, e probabilmente farà un lavoro migliore di quanto avreste potuto +fare voi). + +Un'altra misura delle funzioni sono il numero di variabili locali. Non +dovrebbero eccedere le 5-10, oppure state sbagliando qualcosa. Ripensate la +funzione, e dividetela in pezzettini. Generalmente, un cervello umano può +seguire facilmente circa 7 cose diverse, di più lo confonderebbe. Lo sai +d'essere brillante, ma magari vorresti riuscire a capire cos'avevi fatto due +settimane prima. + +Nei file sorgenti, separate le funzioni con una riga vuota. Se la funzione è +esportata, la macro **EXPORT** per questa funzione deve seguire immediatamente +la riga della parentesi graffa di chiusura. Ad esempio: + +.. code-block:: c + + int system_is_up(void) + { + return system_state == SYSTEM_RUNNING; + } + EXPORT_SYMBOL(system_is_up); + +Nei prototipi di funzione, includete i nomi dei parametri e i loro tipi. +Nonostante questo non sia richiesto dal linguaggio C, in Linux viene preferito +perché è un modo semplice per aggiungere informazioni importanti per il +lettore. + +7) Centralizzare il ritorno delle funzioni +------------------------------------------ + +Sebbene sia deprecata da molte persone, l'istruzione goto è impiegata di +frequente dai compilatori sotto forma di salto incondizionato. + +L'istruzione goto diventa utile quando una funzione ha punti d'uscita multipli +e vanno eseguite alcune procedure di pulizia in comune. Se non è necessario +pulire alcunché, allora ritornate direttamente. + +Assegnate un nome all'etichetta di modo che suggerisca cosa fa la goto o +perché esiste. Un esempio di un buon nome potrebbe essere ``out_free_buffer:`` +se la goto libera (free) un ``buffer``. Evitate l'uso di nomi GW-BASIC come +``err1:`` ed ``err2:``, potreste doverli riordinare se aggiungete o rimuovete +punti d'uscita, e inoltre rende difficile verificarne la correttezza. + +I motivo per usare le goto sono: + +- i salti incondizionati sono più facili da capire e seguire +- l'annidamento si riduce +- si evita di dimenticare, per errore, di aggiornare un singolo punto d'uscita +- aiuta il compilatore ad ottimizzare il codice ridondante ;) + +.. code-block:: c + + int fun(int a) + { + int result = 0; + char *buffer; + + buffer = kmalloc(SIZE, GFP_KERNEL); + if (!buffer) + return -ENOMEM; + + if (condition1) { + while (loop1) { + ... + } + result = 1; + goto out_free_buffer; + } + ... + out_free_buffer: + kfree(buffer); + return result; + } + +Un baco abbastanza comune di cui bisogna prendere nota è il ``one err bugs`` +che assomiglia a questo: + +.. code-block:: c + + err: + kfree(foo->bar); + kfree(foo); + return ret; + +Il baco in questo codice è che in alcuni punti d'uscita la variabile ``foo`` è +NULL. Normalmente si corregge questo baco dividendo la gestione dell'errore in +due parti ``err_free_bar:`` e ``err_free_foo:``: + +.. code-block:: c + + err_free_bar: + kfree(foo->bar); + err_free_foo: + kfree(foo); + return ret; + +Idealmente, dovreste simulare condizioni d'errore per verificare i vostri +percorsi d'uscita. + + +8) Commenti +----------- + +I commenti sono una buona cosa, ma c'è anche il rischio di esagerare. MAI +spiegare COME funziona il vostro codice in un commento: è molto meglio +scrivere il codice di modo che il suo funzionamento sia ovvio, inoltre +spiegare codice scritto male è una perdita di tempo. + +Solitamente, i commenti devono dire COSA fa il codice, e non COME lo fa. +Inoltre, cercate di evitare i commenti nel corpo della funzione: se la +funzione è così complessa che dovete commentarla a pezzi, allora dovreste +tornare al punto 6 per un momento. Potete mettere dei piccoli commenti per +annotare o avvisare il lettore circa un qualcosa di particolarmente arguto +(o brutto), ma cercate di non esagerare. Invece, mettete i commenti in +testa alla funzione spiegando alle persone cosa fa, e possibilmente anche +il PERCHÉ. + +Per favore, quando commentate una funzione dell'API del kernel usate il +formato kernel-doc. Per maggiori dettagli, leggete i file in +:ref::ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/doc-guide/ <it_doc_guide>` e in +``script/kernel-doc``. + +Lo stile preferito per i commenti più lunghi (multi-riga) è: + +.. code-block:: c + + /* + * This is the preferred style for multi-line + * comments in the Linux kernel source code. + * Please use it consistently. + * + * Description: A column of asterisks on the left side, + * with beginning and ending almost-blank lines. + */ + +Per i file in net/ e in drivers/net/ lo stile preferito per i commenti +più lunghi (multi-riga) è leggermente diverso. + +.. code-block:: c + + /* The preferred comment style for files in net/ and drivers/net + * looks like this. + * + * It is nearly the same as the generally preferred comment style, + * but there is no initial almost-blank line. + */ + +È anche importante commentare i dati, sia per i tipi base che per tipi +derivati. A questo scopo, dichiarate un dato per riga (niente virgole +per una dichiarazione multipla). Questo vi lascerà spazio per un piccolo +commento per spiegarne l'uso. + + +9) Avete fatto un pasticcio +--------------------------- + +Va bene, li facciamo tutti. Probabilmente vi è stato detto dal vostro +aiutante Unix di fiducia che ``GNU emacs`` formatta automaticamente il +codice C per conto vostro, e avete notato che sì, in effetti lo fa, ma che +i modi predefiniti non sono proprio allettanti (infatti, sono peggio che +premere tasti a caso - un numero infinito di scimmie che scrivono in +GNU emacs non faranno mai un buon programma). + +Quindi, potete sbarazzarvi di GNU emacs, o riconfigurarlo con valori più +sensati. Per fare quest'ultima cosa, potete appiccicare il codice che +segue nel vostro file .emacs: + +.. code-block:: none + + (defun c-lineup-arglist-tabs-only (ignored) + "Line up argument lists by tabs, not spaces" + (let* ((anchor (c-langelem-pos c-syntactic-element)) + (column (c-langelem-2nd-pos c-syntactic-element)) + (offset (- (1+ column) anchor)) + (steps (floor offset c-basic-offset))) + (* (max steps 1) + c-basic-offset))) + + (add-hook 'c-mode-common-hook + (lambda () + ;; Add kernel style + (c-add-style + "linux-tabs-only" + '("linux" (c-offsets-alist + (arglist-cont-nonempty + c-lineup-gcc-asm-reg + c-lineup-arglist-tabs-only)))))) + + (add-hook 'c-mode-hook + (lambda () + (let ((filename (buffer-file-name))) + ;; Enable kernel mode for the appropriate files + (when (and filename + (string-match (expand-file-name "~/src/linux-trees") + filename)) + (setq indent-tabs-mode t) + (setq show-trailing-whitespace t) + (c-set-style "linux-tabs-only"))))) + +Questo farà funzionare meglio emacs con lo stile del kernel per i file che +si trovano nella cartella ``~/src/linux-trees``. + +Ma anche se doveste fallire nell'ottenere una formattazione sensata in emacs +non tutto è perduto: usate ``indent``. + +Ora, ancora, GNU indent ha la stessa configurazione decerebrata di GNU emacs, +ed è per questo che dovete passargli alcune opzioni da riga di comando. +Tuttavia, non è così terribile, perché perfino i creatori di GNU indent +riconoscono l'autorità di K&R (le persone del progetto GNU non sono cattive, +sono solo mal indirizzate sull'argomento), quindi date ad indent le opzioni +``-kr -i8`` (che significa ``K&R, 8 caratteri di indentazione``), o utilizzate +``scripts/Lindent`` che indenterà usando l'ultimo stile. + +``indent`` ha un sacco di opzioni, e specialmente quando si tratta di +riformattare i commenti dovreste dare un'occhiata alle pagine man. +Ma ricordatevi: ``indent`` non è un correttore per una cattiva programmazione. + +Da notare che potete utilizzare anche ``clang-format`` per aiutarvi con queste +regole, per riformattare rapidamente ad automaticamente alcune parti del +vostro codice, e per revisionare interi file al fine di identificare errori +di stile, refusi e possibilmente anche delle migliorie. È anche utile per +ordinare gli ``#include``, per allineare variabili/macro, per ridistribuire +il testo e altre cose simili. +Per maggiori dettagli, consultate il file +:ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/clang-format.rst <it_clangformat>`. + + +10) File di configurazione Kconfig +---------------------------------- + +Per tutti i file di configurazione Kconfig* che si possono trovare nei +sorgenti, l'indentazione è un po' differente. Le linee dopo un ``config`` +sono indentate con un tab, mentre il testo descrittivo è indentato di +ulteriori due spazi. Esempio:: + + config AUDIT + bool "Auditing support" + depends on NET + help + Enable auditing infrastructure that can be used with another + kernel subsystem, such as SELinux (which requires this for + logging of avc messages output). Does not do system-call + auditing without CONFIG_AUDITSYSCALL. + +Le funzionalità davvero pericolose (per esempio il supporto alla scrittura +per certi filesystem) dovrebbero essere dichiarate chiaramente come tali +nella stringa di titolo:: + + config ADFS_FS_RW + bool "ADFS write support (DANGEROUS)" + depends on ADFS_FS + ... + +Per la documentazione completa sui file di configurazione, consultate +il documento Documentation/translations/it_IT/kbuild/kconfig-language.txt + + +11) Strutture dati +------------------ + +Le strutture dati che hanno una visibilità superiore al contesto del +singolo thread in cui vengono create e distrutte, dovrebbero sempre +avere un contatore di riferimenti. Nel kernel non esiste un +*garbage collector* (e fuori dal kernel i *garbage collector* sono lenti +e inefficienti), questo significa che **dovete** assolutamente avere un +contatore di riferimenti per ogni cosa che usate. + +Avere un contatore di riferimenti significa che potete evitare la +sincronizzazione e permette a più utenti di accedere alla struttura dati +in parallelo - e non doversi preoccupare di una struttura dati che +improvvisamente sparisce dalla loro vista perché il loro processo dormiva +o stava facendo altro per un attimo. + +Da notare che la sincronizzazione **non** si sostituisce al conteggio dei +riferimenti. La sincronizzazione ha lo scopo di mantenere le strutture +dati coerenti, mentre il conteggio dei riferimenti è una tecnica di gestione +della memoria. Solitamente servono entrambe le cose, e non vanno confuse fra +di loro. + +Quando si hanno diverse classi di utenti, le strutture dati possono avere +due livelli di contatori di riferimenti. Il contatore di classe conta +il numero dei suoi utenti, e il contatore globale viene decrementato una +sola volta quando il contatore di classe va a zero. + +Un esempio di questo tipo di conteggio dei riferimenti multi-livello può +essere trovato nella gestore della memoria (``struct mm_sturct``: mm_user e +mm_count), e nel codice dei filesystem (``struct super_block``: s_count e +s_active). + +Ricordatevi: se un altro thread può trovare la vostra struttura dati, e non +avete un contatore di riferimenti per essa, quasi certamente avete un baco. + +12) Macro, enumerati e RTL +--------------------------- + +I nomi delle macro che definiscono delle costanti e le etichette degli +enumerati sono scritte in maiuscolo. + +.. code-block:: c + + #define CONSTANT 0x12345 + +Gli enumerati sono da preferire quando si definiscono molte costanti correlate. + +I nomi delle macro in MAIUSCOLO sono preferibili ma le macro che assomigliano +a delle funzioni possono essere scritte in minuscolo. + +Generalmente, le funzioni inline sono preferibili rispetto alle macro che +sembrano funzioni. + +Le macro che contengono più istruzioni dovrebbero essere sempre chiuse in un +blocco do - while: + +.. code-block:: c + + #define macrofun(a, b, c) \ + do { \ + if (a == 5) \ + do_this(b, c); \ + } while (0) + +Cose da evitare quando si usano le macro: + +1) le macro che hanno effetti sul flusso del codice: + +.. code-block:: c + + #define FOO(x) \ + do { \ + if (blah(x) < 0) \ + return -EBUGGERED; \ + } while (0) + +sono **proprio** una pessima idea. Sembra una chiamata a funzione ma termina +la funzione chiamante; non cercate di rompere il decodificatore interno di +chi legge il codice. + +2) le macro che dipendono dall'uso di una variabile locale con un nome magico: + +.. code-block:: c + + #define FOO(val) bar(index, val) + +potrebbe sembrare una bella cosa, ma è dannatamente confusionario quando uno +legge il codice e potrebbe romperlo con una cambiamento che sembra innocente. + +3) le macro con argomenti che sono utilizzati come l-values; questo potrebbe +ritorcervisi contro se qualcuno, per esempio, trasforma FOO in una funzione +inline. + +4) dimenticatevi delle precedenze: le macro che definiscono espressioni devono +essere racchiuse fra parentesi. State attenti a problemi simili con le macro +parametrizzate. + +.. code-block:: c + + #define CONSTANT 0x4000 + #define CONSTEXP (CONSTANT | 3) + +5) collisione nello spazio dei nomi quando si definisce una variabile locale in +una macro che sembra una funzione: + +.. code-block:: c + + #define FOO(x) \ + ({ \ + typeof(x) ret; \ + ret = calc_ret(x); \ + (ret); \ + }) + +ret è un nome comune per una variabile locale - __foo_ret difficilmente +andrà in conflitto con una variabile già esistente. + +Il manuale di cpp si occupa esaustivamente delle macro. Il manuale di sviluppo +di gcc copre anche l'RTL che viene usato frequentemente nel kernel per il +linguaggio assembler. + +13) Visualizzare i messaggi del kernel +-------------------------------------- + +Agli sviluppatori del kernel piace essere visti come dotti. Tenete un occhio +di riguardo per l'ortografia e farete una belle figura. In inglese, evitate +l'uso di parole mozzate come ``dont``: usate ``do not`` oppure ``don't``. +Scrivete messaggi concisi, chiari, e inequivocabili. + +I messaggi del kernel non devono terminare con un punto fermo. + +Scrivere i numeri fra parentesi (%d) non migliora alcunché e per questo +dovrebbero essere evitati. + +Ci sono alcune macro per la diagnostica in <linux/device.h> che dovreste +usare per assicurarvi che i messaggi vengano associati correttamente ai +dispositivi e ai driver, e che siano etichettati correttamente: dev_err(), +dev_warn(), dev_info(), e così via. Per messaggi che non sono associati ad +alcun dispositivo, <linux/printk.h> definisce pr_info(), pr_warn(), pr_err(), +eccetera. + +Tirar fuori un buon messaggio di debug può essere una vera sfida; e quando +l'avete può essere d'enorme aiuto per risolvere problemi da remoto. +Tuttavia, i messaggi di debug sono gestiti differentemente rispetto agli +altri. Le funzioni pr_XXX() stampano incondizionatamente ma pr_debug() no; +essa non viene compilata nella configurazione predefinita, a meno che +DEBUG o CONFIG_DYNAMIC_DEBUG non vengono impostati. Questo vale anche per +dev_dbg() e in aggiunta VERBOSE_DEBUG per aggiungere i messaggi dev_vdbg(). + +Molti sottosistemi hanno delle opzioni di debug in Kconfig che aggiungono +-DDEBUG nei corrispettivi Makefile, e in altri casi aggiungono #define DEBUG +in specifici file. Infine, quando un messaggio di debug dev'essere stampato +incondizionatamente, per esempio perché siete già in una sezione di debug +racchiusa in #ifdef, potete usare printk(KERN_DEBUG ...). + +14) Assegnare memoria +--------------------- + +Il kernel fornisce i seguenti assegnatori ad uso generico: +kmalloc(), kzalloc(), kmalloc_array(), kcalloc(), vmalloc(), e vzalloc(). +Per maggiori informazioni, consultate la documentazione dell'API. + +Il modo preferito per passare la dimensione di una struttura è il seguente: + +.. code-block:: c + + p = kmalloc(sizeof(*p), ...); + +La forma alternativa, dove il nome della struttura viene scritto interamente, +peggiora la leggibilità e introduce possibili bachi quando il tipo di +puntatore cambia tipo ma il corrispondente sizeof non viene aggiornato. + +Il valore di ritorno è un puntatore void, effettuare un cast su di esso è +ridondante. La conversione fra un puntatore void e un qualsiasi altro tipo +di puntatore è garantito dal linguaggio di programmazione C. + +Il modo preferito per assegnare un vettore è il seguente: + +.. code-block:: c + + p = kmalloc_array(n, sizeof(...), ...); + +Il modo preferito per assegnare un vettore a zero è il seguente: + +.. code-block:: c + + p = kcalloc(n, sizeof(...), ...); + +Entrambe verificano la condizione di overflow per la dimensione +d'assegnamento n * sizeof(...), se accade ritorneranno NULL. + +15) Il morbo inline +------------------- + +Sembra che ci sia la percezione errata che gcc abbia una qualche magica +opzione "rendimi più veloce" chiamata ``inline``. In alcuni casi l'uso di +inline è appropriato (per esempio in sostituzione delle macro, vedi +capitolo 12), ma molto spesso non lo è. L'uso abbondante della parola chiave +inline porta ad avere un kernel più grande, che si traduce in un sistema nel +suo complesso più lento per via di una cache per le istruzioni della CPU più +grande e poi semplicemente perché ci sarà meno spazio disponibile per una +pagina di cache. Pensateci un attimo; una fallimento nella cache causa una +ricerca su disco che può tranquillamente richiedere 5 millisecondi. Ci sono +TANTI cicli di CPU che potrebbero essere usati in questi 5 millisecondi. + +Spesso le persone dicono che aggiungere inline a delle funzioni dichiarate +static e utilizzare una sola volta è sempre una scelta vincente perché non +ci sono altri compromessi. Questo è tecnicamente vero ma gcc è in grado di +trasformare automaticamente queste funzioni in inline; i problemi di +manutenzione del codice per rimuovere gli inline quando compare un secondo +utente surclassano il potenziale vantaggio nel suggerire a gcc di fare una +cosa che avrebbe fatto comunque. + +16) Nomi e valori di ritorno delle funzioni +------------------------------------------- + +Le funzioni possono ritornare diversi tipi di valori, e uno dei più comuni +è quel valore che indica se una funzione ha completato con successo o meno. +Questo valore può essere rappresentato come un codice di errore intero +(-Exxx = fallimento, 0 = successo) oppure un booleano di successo +(0 = fallimento, non-zero = successo). + +Mischiare questi due tipi di rappresentazioni è un terreno fertile per +i bachi più insidiosi. Se il linguaggio C includesse una forte distinzione +fra gli interi e i booleani, allora il compilatore potrebbe trovare questi +errori per conto nostro ... ma questo non c'è. Per evitare di imbattersi +in questo tipo di baco, seguite sempre la seguente convenzione:: + + Se il nome di una funzione è un'azione o un comando imperativo, + essa dovrebbe ritornare un codice di errore intero. Se il nome + è un predicato, la funzione dovrebbe ritornare un booleano di + "successo" + +Per esempio, ``add work`` è un comando, e la funzione add_work() ritorna 0 +in caso di successo o -EBUSY in caso di fallimento. Allo stesso modo, +``PCI device present`` è un predicato, e la funzione pci_dev_present() ritorna +1 se trova il dispositivo corrispondente con successo, altrimenti 0. + +Tutte le funzioni esportate (EXPORT) devono rispettare questa convenzione, e +così dovrebbero anche tutte le funzioni pubbliche. Le funzioni private +(static) possono non seguire questa convenzione, ma è comunque raccomandato +che lo facciano. + +Le funzioni il cui valore di ritorno è il risultato di una computazione, +piuttosto che l'indicazione sul successo di tale computazione, non sono +soggette a questa regola. Solitamente si indicano gli errori ritornando un +qualche valore fuori dai limiti. Un tipico esempio è quello delle funzioni +che ritornano un puntatore; queste utilizzano NULL o ERR_PTR come meccanismo +di notifica degli errori. + +17) Non reinventate le macro del kernel +--------------------------------------- + +Il file di intestazione include/linux/kernel.h contiene un certo numero +di macro che dovreste usare piuttosto che implementarne una qualche variante. +Per esempio, se dovete calcolare la lunghezza di un vettore, sfruttate la +macro: + +.. code-block:: c + + #define ARRAY_SIZE(x) (sizeof(x) / sizeof((x)[0])) + +Analogamente, se dovete calcolare la dimensione di un qualche campo di una +struttura, usate + +.. code-block:: c + + #define FIELD_SIZEOF(t, f) (sizeof(((t*)0)->f)) + +Ci sono anche le macro min() e max() che, se vi serve, effettuano un controllo +rigido sui tipi. Sentitevi liberi di leggere attentamente questo file +d'intestazione per scoprire cos'altro è stato definito che non dovreste +reinventare nel vostro codice. + +18) Linee di configurazione degli editor e altre schifezze +----------------------------------------------------------- + +Alcuni editor possono interpretare dei parametri di configurazione integrati +nei file sorgenti e indicati con dai marcatori speciali. Per esempio, emacs +interpreta le linee marcate nel seguente modo: + +.. code-block:: c + + -*- mode: c -*- + +O come queste: + +.. code-block:: c + + /* + Local Variables: + compile-command: "gcc -DMAGIC_DEBUG_FLAG foo.c" + End: + */ + +Vim interpreta i marcatori come questi: + +.. code-block:: c + + /* vim:set sw=8 noet */ + +Non includete nessuna di queste cose nei file sorgenti. Le persone hanno le +proprie configurazioni personali per l'editor, e i vostri sorgenti non +dovrebbero sovrascrivergliele. Questo vale anche per i marcatori +d'indentazione e di modalità d'uso. Le persone potrebbero aver configurato una +modalità su misura, oppure potrebbero avere qualche altra magia per far +funzionare bene l'indentazione. + +19) Inline assembly +--------------------- + +Nel codice specifico per un'architettura, potreste aver bisogno di codice +*inline assembly* per interfacciarvi col processore o con una funzionalità +specifica della piattaforma. Non esitate a farlo quando è necessario. +Comunque, non usatele gratuitamente quando il C può fare la stessa cosa. +Potete e dovreste punzecchiare l'hardware in C quando è possibile. + +Considerate la scrittura di una semplice funzione che racchiude pezzi comuni +di codice assembler piuttosto che continuare a riscrivere delle piccole +varianti. Ricordatevi che l' *inline assembly* può utilizzare i parametri C. + +Il codice assembler più corposo e non banale dovrebbe andare nei file .S, +coi rispettivi prototipi C definiti nei file d'intestazione. I prototipi C +per le funzioni assembler dovrebbero usare ``asmlinkage``. + +Potreste aver bisogno di marcare il vostro codice asm come volatile al fine +d'evitare che GCC lo rimuova quando pensa che non ci siano effetti collaterali. +Non c'è sempre bisogno di farlo, e farlo quando non serve limita le +ottimizzazioni. + +Quando scrivete una singola espressione *inline assembly* contenente più +istruzioni, mettete ognuna di queste istruzioni in una stringa e riga diversa; +ad eccezione dell'ultima stringa/istruzione, ognuna deve terminare con ``\n\t`` +al fine di allineare correttamente l'assembler che verrà generato: + +.. code-block:: c + + asm ("magic %reg1, #42\n\t" + "more_magic %reg2, %reg3" + : /* outputs */ : /* inputs */ : /* clobbers */); + +20) Compilazione sotto condizione +--------------------------------- + +Ovunque sia possibile, non usate le direttive condizionali del preprocessore +(#if, #ifdef) nei file .c; farlo rende il codice difficile da leggere e da +seguire. Invece, usate queste direttive nei file d'intestazione per definire +le funzioni usate nei file .c, fornendo i relativi stub nel caso #else, +e quindi chiamate queste funzioni senza condizioni di preprocessore. Il +compilatore non produrrà alcun codice per le funzioni stub, produrrà gli +stessi risultati, e la logica rimarrà semplice da seguire. + +È preferibile non compilare intere funzioni piuttosto che porzioni d'esse o +porzioni d'espressioni. Piuttosto che mettere una ifdef in un'espressione, +fattorizzate parte dell'espressione, o interamente, in funzioni e applicate +la direttiva condizionale su di esse. + +Se avete una variabile o funzione che potrebbe non essere usata in alcune +configurazioni, e quindi il compilatore potrebbe avvisarvi circa la definizione +inutilizzata, marcate questa definizione come __maybe_used piuttosto che +racchiuderla in una direttiva condizionale del preprocessore. (Comunque, +se una variabile o funzione è *sempre* inutilizzata, rimuovetela). + +Nel codice, dov'è possibile, usate la macro IS_ENABLED per convertire i +simboli Kconfig in espressioni booleane C, e quindi usatela nelle classiche +condizioni C: + +.. code-block:: c + + if (IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_SOMETHING)) { + ... + } + +Il compilatore valuterà la condizione come costante (constant-fold), e quindi +includerà o escluderà il blocco di codice come se fosse in un #ifdef, quindi +non ne aumenterà il tempo di esecuzione. Tuttavia, questo permette al +compilatore C di vedere il codice nel blocco condizionale e verificarne la +correttezza (sintassi, tipi, riferimenti ai simboli, eccetera). Quindi +dovete comunque utilizzare #ifdef se il codice nel blocco condizionale esiste +solo quando la condizione è soddisfatta. + +Alla fine di un blocco corposo di #if o #ifdef (più di alcune linee), +mettete un commento sulla stessa riga di #endif, annotando la condizione +che termina. Per esempio: + +.. code-block:: c + + #ifdef CONFIG_SOMETHING + ... + #endif /* CONFIG_SOMETHING */ + +Appendice I) riferimenti +------------------------ + +The C Programming Language, Second Edition +by Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie. +Prentice Hall, Inc., 1988. +ISBN 0-13-110362-8 (paperback), 0-13-110370-9 (hardback). + +The Practice of Programming +by Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike. +Addison-Wesley, Inc., 1999. +ISBN 0-201-61586-X. + +Manuali GNU - nei casi in cui sono compatibili con K&R e questo documento - +per indent, cpp, gcc e i suoi dettagli interni, tutto disponibile qui +http://www.gnu.org/manual/ + +WG14 è il gruppo internazionale di standardizzazione per il linguaggio C, +URL: http://www.open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG14/ + +Kernel process/coding-style.rst, by greg@kroah.com at OLS 2002: +http://www.kroah.com/linux/talks/ols_2002_kernel_codingstyle_talk/html/ diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/development-process.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/development-process.rst @@ -0,0 +1,33 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/development-process.rst <development_process_main>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_development_process_main: + +Una guida al processo di sviluppo del Kernel +============================================ + +Contenuti: + +.. toctree:: + :numbered: + :maxdepth: 2 + + 1.Intro + 2.Process + 3.Early-stage + 4.Coding + 5.Posting + 6.Followthrough + 7.AdvancedTopics + 8.Conclusion + +Lo scopo di questo documento è quello di aiutare gli sviluppatori (ed i loro +supervisori) a lavorare con la communità di sviluppo con il minimo sforzo. È +un tentativo di documentare il funzionamento di questa communità in modo che +sia accessibile anche a coloro che non hanno famigliarità con lo sviluppo del +Kernel Linux (o, anzi, con lo sviluppo di software libero in generale). Benchè +qui sia presente del materiale tecnico, questa è una discussione rivolta in +particolare al procedimento, e quindi per essere compreso non richiede una +conoscenza approfondità sullo sviluppo del kernel. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/email-clients.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/email-clients.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/email-clients.rst <email_clients>` + +.. _it_email_clients: + +Informazioni sui programmi di posta elettronica per Linux +========================================================= + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/howto.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/howto.rst @@ -0,0 +1,655 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/howto.rst <process_howto>` +:Translator: Alessia Mantegazza <amantegazza@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_process_howto: + +Come partecipare allo sviluppo del kernel Linux +=============================================== + +Questo è il documento fulcro di quanto trattato sull'argomento. +Esso contiene le istruzioni su come diventare uno sviluppatore +del kernel Linux e spiega come lavorare con la comunità di +sviluppo kernel Linux. Il documento non tratterà alcun aspetto +tecnico relativo alla programmazione del kernel, ma vi aiuterà +indirizzandovi sulla corretta strada. + +Se qualsiasi cosa presente in questo documento diventasse obsoleta, +vi preghiamo di inviare le correzioni agli amministratori di questo +file, indicati in fondo al presente documento. + +Introduzione +------------ +Dunque, volete imparare come diventare sviluppatori del kernel Linux? +O vi è stato detto dal vostro capo, "Vai, scrivi un driver Linux per +questo dispositivo". Bene, l'obbiettivo di questo documento è quello +di insegnarvi tutto ciò che dovete sapere per raggiungere il vostro +scopo descrivendo il procedimento da seguire e consigliandovi +su come lavorare con la comunità. Il documento cercherà, inoltre, +di spiegare alcune delle ragioni per le quali la comunità lavora in un +modo suo particolare. + +Il kernel è scritto prevalentemente nel linguaggio C con alcune parti +specifiche dell'architettura scritte in linguaggio assembly. +Per lo sviluppo kernel è richiesta una buona conoscenza del linguaggio C. +L'assembly (di qualsiasi architettura) non è richiesto, a meno che non +pensiate di fare dello sviluppo di basso livello per un'architettura. +Sebbene essi non siano un buon sostituto ad un solido studio del +linguaggio C o ad anni di esperienza, i seguenti libri sono, se non +altro, utili riferimenti: + +- "The C Programming Language" di Kernighan e Ritchie [Prentice Hall] +- "Practical C Programming" di Steve Oualline [O'Reilly] +- "C: A Reference Manual" di Harbison and Steele [Prentice Hall] + +Il kernel è stato scritto usando GNU C e la toolchain GNU. +Sebbene si attenga allo standard ISO C89, esso utilizza una serie di +estensioni che non sono previste in questo standard. Il kernel è un +ambiente C indipendente, che non ha alcuna dipendenza dalle librerie +C standard, così alcune parti del C standard non sono supportate. +Le divisioni ``long long`` e numeri in virgola mobile non sono permessi. +Qualche volta è difficile comprendere gli assunti che il kernel ha +riguardo gli strumenti e le estensioni in uso, e sfortunatamente non +esiste alcuna indicazione definitiva. Per maggiori informazioni, controllate, +la pagina `info gcc`. + +Tenete a mente che state cercando di apprendere come lavorare con la comunità +di sviluppo già esistente. Questo è un gruppo eterogeneo di persone, con alti +standard di codifica, di stile e di procedura. Questi standard sono stati +creati nel corso del tempo basandosi su quanto hanno riscontrato funzionare al +meglio per un squadra così grande e geograficamente sparsa. Cercate di +imparare, in anticipo, il più possibile circa questi standard, poichè ben +spiegati; non aspettatevi che gli altri si adattino al vostro modo di fare +o a quello della vostra azienda. + +Note legali +------------ +Il codice sorgente del kernel Linux è rilasciato sotto GPL. Siete pregati +di visionare il file, COPYING, presente nella cartella principale dei +sorgente, per eventuali dettagli sulla licenza. Se avete ulteriori domande +sulla licenza, contattate un avvocato, non chiedete sulle liste di discussione +del kernel Linux. Le persone presenti in queste liste non sono avvocati, +e non dovreste basarvi sulle loro dichiarazioni in materia giuridica. + +Per domande più frequenti e risposte sulla licenza GPL, guardare: + + https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html + +Documentazione +-------------- +I sorgenti del kernel Linux hanno una vasta base di documenti che vi +insegneranno come interagire con la comunità del kernel. Quando nuove +funzionalità vengono aggiunte al kernel, si raccomanda di aggiungere anche i +relativi file di documentatione che spiegano come usarele. +Quando un cambiamento del kernel genera anche un cambiamento nell'interfaccia +con lo spazio utente, è raccomandabile che inviate una notifica o una +correzione alle pagine *man* spiegando tale modifica agli amministratori di +queste pagine all'indirizzo mtk.manpages@gmail.com, aggiungendo +in CC la lista linux-api@vger.kernel.org. + +Di seguito una lista di file che sono presenti nei sorgente del kernel e che +è richiesto che voi leggiate: + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/README.rst <it_readme>` + Questo file da una piccola anteprima del kernel Linux e descrive il + minimo necessario per configurare e generare il kernel. I novizi + del kernel dovrebbero iniziare da qui. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/changes.rst <it_changes>` + + Questo file fornisce una lista dei pacchetti software necessari + a compilare e far funzionare il kernel con successo. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/coding-style.rst <it_codingstyle>` + + Questo file descrive lo stile della codifica per il kernel Linux, + e parte delle motivazioni che ne sono alla base. Tutto il nuovo codice deve + seguire le linee guida in questo documento. Molti amministratori + accetteranno patch solo se queste osserveranno tali regole, e molte + persone revisioneranno il codice solo se scritto nello stile appropriato. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst <it_submittingpatches>` e + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-drivers.rst <it_submittingdrivers>` + + Questo file descrive dettagliatamente come creare ed inviare una patch + con successo, includendo (ma non solo questo): + + - Contenuto delle email + - Formato delle email + - I destinatari delle email + + Seguire tali regole non garantirà il successo (tutte le patch sono soggette + a controlli realitivi a contenuto e stile), ma non seguirle lo precluderà + sempre. + + Altre ottime descrizioni di come creare buone patch sono: + + "The Perfect Patch" + https://www.ozlabs.org/~akpm/stuff/tpp.txt + + "Linux kernel patch submission format" + http://linux.yyz.us/patch-format.html + + :ref:`Documentation/process/translations/it_IT/stable-api-nonsense.rst <it_stable_api_nonsense>` + + Questo file descrive la motivazioni sottostanti la conscia decisione di + non avere un API stabile all'interno del kernel, incluso cose come: + + - Sottosistemi shim-layers (per compatibilità?) + - Portabilità fra Sistemi Operativi dei driver. + - Attenuare i rapidi cambiamenti all'interno dei sorgenti del kernel + (o prevenirli) + + Questo documento è vitale per la comprensione della filosifia alla base + dello sviluppo di Linux ed è molto importante per le persone che arrivano + da esperienze con altri Sistemi Operativi. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/admin-guide/security-bugs.rst <it_securitybugs>` + Se ritenete di aver trovato un problema di sicurezza nel kernel Linux, + seguite i passaggi scritti in questo documento per notificarlo agli + sviluppatori del kernel, ed aiutare la risoluzione del problema. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/management-style.rst <it_managementstyle>` + Questo documento descrive come i manutentori del kernel Linux operano + e la filosofia comune alla base del loro metodo. Questa è un'importante + lettura per tutti coloro che sono nuovi allo sviluppo del kernel (o per + chi è semplicemente curioso), poiché risolve molti dei più comuni + fraintendimenti e confusioni dovuti al particolare comportamento dei + manutentori del kernel. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst <it_stable_kernel_rules>` + Questo file descrive le regole sulle quali vengono basati i rilasci del + kernel, e spiega cosa fare se si vuole che una modifica venga inserita + in uno di questi rilasci. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-docs.rst <it_kernel_docs>` + Una lista di documenti pertinenti allo sviluppo del kernel. + Per favore consultate questa lista se non trovate ciò che cercate nella + documentazione interna del kernel. + + :ref:`Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/applying-patches.rst <it_applying_patches>` + Una buona introduzione che descrivere esattamente cos'è una patch e come + applicarla ai differenti rami di sviluppo del kernel. + +Il kernel inoltre ha un vasto numero di documenti che possono essere +automaticamente generati dal codice sorgente stesso o da file +ReStructuredText (ReST), come questo. Esso include una completa +descrizione dell'API interna del kernel, e le regole su come gestire la +sincronizzazione (locking) correttamente + +Tutte queste tipologie di documenti possono essere generati in PDF o in +HTML utilizzando:: + + make pdfdocs + make htmldocs + +rispettivamente dalla cartella principale dei sorgenti del kernel. + +I documenti che impiegano ReST saranno generati nella cartella +Documentation/output. +Questi posso essere generati anche in formato LaTex e ePub con:: + + make latexdocs + make epubdocs + +Diventare uno sviluppatore del kernel +------------------------------------- +Se non sapete nulla sullo sviluppo del kernel Linux, dovreste dare uno +sguardo al progetto *Linux KernelNewbies*: + + https://kernelnewbies.org + +Esso prevede un'utile lista di discussione dove potete porre più o meno ogni +tipo di quesito relativo ai concetti fondamentali sullo sviluppo del kernel +(assicuratevi di cercare negli archivi, prima di chiedere qualcosa alla +quale è già stata fornita risposta in passato). Esistono inoltre, un canale IRC +che potete usare per formulare domande in tempo reale, e molti documenti utili +che vi faciliteranno nell'apprendimento dello sviluppo del kernel Linux. + +Il sito internet contiene informazioni di base circa l'organizzazione del +codice, sottosistemi e progetti attuali (sia interni che esterni a Linux). +Esso descrive, inoltre, informazioni logistiche di base, riguardanti ad esempio +la compilazione del kernel e l'applicazione di una modifica. + +Se non sapete dove cominciare, ma volete cercare delle attività dalle quali +partire per partecipare alla comunità di sviluppo, andate al progetto Linux +Kernel Janitor's. + + https://kernelnewbies.org/KernelJanitors + +È un buon posto da cui iniziare. Esso presenta una lista di problematiche +relativamente semplici da sistemare e pulire all'interno della sorgente del +kernel Linux. Lavorando con gli sviluppatori incaricati di questo progetto, +imparerete le basi per l'inserimento delle vostre modifiche all'interno dei +sorgenti del kernel Linux, e possibilmente, sarete indirizzati al lavoro +successivo da svolgere, se non ne avrete ancora idea. + +Prima di apportare una qualsiasi modifica al codice del kernel Linux, +è imperativo comprendere come tale codice funziona. A questo scopo, non c'è +nulla di meglio che leggerlo direttamente (la maggior parte dei bit più +complessi sono ben commentati), eventualmente anche con l'aiuto di strumenti +specializzati. Uno degli strumenti che è particolarmente raccomandato è +il progetto Linux Cross-Reference, che è in grado di presentare codice +sorgente in un formato autoreferenziale ed indicizzato. Un eccellente ed +aggiornata fonte di consultazione del codice del kernel la potete trovare qui: + + http://lxr.free-electrons.com/ + + +Il processo di sviluppo +----------------------- +Il processo di sviluppo del kernel Linux si compone di pochi "rami" principali +e di molti altri rami per specifici sottosistemi. Questi rami sono: + + - I sorgenti kernel 4.x + - I sorgenti stabili del kernel 4.x.y -stable + - Le modifiche in 4.x -git + - Sorgenti dei sottosistemi del kernel e le loro modifiche + - Il kernel 4.x -next per test d'integrazione + +I sorgenti kernel 4.x +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +I kernel 4.x sono amministrati da Linus Torvald, e possono essere trovati +su https://kernel.org nella cartella pub/linux/kernel/v4.x/. Il processo +di sviluppo è il seguente: + + - Non appena un nuovo kernel viene rilasciato si apre una finestra di due + settimane. Durante questo periodo i manutentori possono proporre a Linus + dei grossi cambiamenti; solitamente i cambiamenti che sono già stati + inseriti nel ramo -next del kernel per alcune settimane. Il modo migliore + per sottoporre dei cambiamenti è attraverso git (lo strumento usato per + gestire i sorgenti del kernel, più informazioni sul sito + https://git-scm.com/) ma anche delle patch vanno bene. + + - Al termine delle due settimane un kernel -rc1 viene rilasciato e + l'obbiettivo ora è quello di renderlo il più solido possibile. A questo + punto la maggior parte delle patch dovrebbero correggere un'eventuale + regressione. I bachi che sono sempre esistiti non sono considerabili come + regressioni, quindi inviate questo tipo di cambiamenti solo se sono + importanti. Notate che un intero driver (o filesystem) potrebbe essere + accettato dopo la -rc1 poiché non esistono rischi di una possibile + regressione con tale cambiamento, fintanto che quest'ultimo è + auto-contenuto e non influisce su aree esterne al codice che è stato + aggiunto. git può essere utilizzato per inviare le patch a Linus dopo che + la -rc1 è stata rilasciata, ma è anche necessario inviare le patch ad + una lista di discussione pubblica per un'ulteriore revisione. + + - Una nuova -rc viene rilasciata ogni volta che Linus reputa che gli attuali + sorgenti siano in uno stato di salute ragionevolmente adeguato ai test. + L'obiettivo è quello di rilasciare una nuova -rc ogni settimana. + + - Il processo continua fino a che il kernel è considerato "pronto"; tale + processo dovrebbe durare circa in 6 settimane. + +È utile menzionare quanto scritto da Andrew Morton sulla lista di discussione +kernel-linux in merito ai rilasci del kernel: + + *"Nessuno sa quando un kernel verrà rilasciato, poichè questo è + legato allo stato dei bachi e non ad una cronologia preventiva."* + +I sorgenti stabili del kernel 4.x.y -stable +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +I kernel con versioni in 3-parti sono "kernel stabili". Essi contengono +correzioni critiche relativamente piccole nell'ambito della sicurezza +oppure significative regressioni scoperte in un dato 4.x kernel. + +Questo è il ramo raccomandato per gli utenti che vogliono un kernel recente +e stabile e non sono interessati a dare il proprio contributo alla verifica +delle versioni di sviluppo o sperimentali. + +Se non è disponibile alcun kernel 4.x.y., quello più aggiornato e stabile +sarà il kernel 4.x con la numerazione più alta. + +4.x.y sono amministrati dal gruppo "stable" <stable@vger.kernel.org>, e sono +rilasciati a seconda delle esigenze. Il normale periodo di rilascio è +approssimativamente di due settimane, ma può essere più lungo se non si +verificano problematiche urgenti. Un problema relativo alla sicurezza, invece, +può determinare un rilascio immediato. + +Il file Documentation/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst (nei sorgenti) documenta +quali tipologie di modifiche sono accettate per i sorgenti -stable, e come +avviene il processo di rilascio. + +Le modifiche in 4.x -git +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +Queste sono istantanee quotidiane del kernel di Linus e sono gestite in +una repositorio git (da qui il nome). Queste modifiche sono solitamente +rilasciate giornalmente e rappresentano l'attuale stato dei sorgenti di +Linus. Queste sono da considerarsi più sperimentali di un -rc in quanto +generate automaticamente senza nemmeno aver dato una rapida occhiata +per verificarne lo stato. + + +Sorgenti dei sottosistemi del kernel e le loro patch +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +I manutentori dei diversi sottosistemi del kernel --- ed anche molti +sviluppatori di sottosistemi --- mostrano il loro attuale stato di sviluppo +nei loro repositori. In questo modo, altri possono vedere cosa succede nelle +diverse parti del kernel. In aree dove lo sviluppo è rapido, potrebbe essere +chiesto ad uno sviluppatore di basare le proprie modifiche su questi repositori +in modo da evitare i conflitti fra le sottomissioni ed altri lavori in corso + +La maggior parte di questi repositori sono git, ma esistono anche altri SCM +in uso, o file di patch pubblicate come una serie quilt. +Gli indirizzi dei repositori di sottosistema sono indicati nel file +MAINTAINERS. Molti di questi posso essere trovati su https://git.kernel.org/. + +Prima che una modifica venga inclusa in questi sottosistemi, sarà soggetta ad +una revisione che inizialmente avviene tramite liste di discussione (vedere la +sezione dedicata qui sotto). Per molti sottosistemi del kernel, tale processo +di revisione è monitorato con lo strumento patchwork. +Patchwork offre un'interfaccia web che mostra le patch pubblicate, inclusi i +commenti o le revisioni fatte, e gli amministratori possono indicare le patch +come "in revisione", "accettate", o "rifiutate". Diversi siti Patchwork sono +elencati al sito https://patchwork.kernel.org/. + +Il kernel 4.x -next per test d'integrazione +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +Prima che gli aggiornamenti dei sottosistemi siano accorpati nel ramo +principale 4.x, sarà necessario un test d'integrazione. +A tale scopo, esiste un repositorio speciale di test nel quale virtualmente +tutti i rami dei sottosistemi vengono inclusi su base quotidiana: + + https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/next/linux-next.git + +In questo modo, i kernel -next offrono uno sguardo riassuntivo su quello che +ci si aspetterà essere nel kernel principale nel successivo periodo +d'incorporazione. +Coloro che vorranno fare dei test d'esecuzione del kernel -next sono più che +benvenuti. + + +Riportare Bug +------------- + +https://bugzilla.kernel.org è dove gli sviluppatori del kernel Linux tracciano +i bachi del kernel. Gli utenti sono incoraggiati nel riportare tutti i bachi +che trovano utilizzando questo strumento. +Per maggiori dettagli su come usare il bugzilla del kernel, guardare: + + https://bugzilla.kernel.org/page.cgi?id=faq.html + +Il file admin-guide/reporting-bugs.rst nella cartella principale del kernel +fornisce un buon modello sul come segnalare un baco nel kernel, e spiega quali +informazioni sono necessarie agli sviluppatori per poter aiutare il +rintracciamento del problema. + +Gestire i rapporti sui bug +-------------------------- + +Uno dei modi migliori per mettere in pratica le vostre capacità di hacking è +quello di riparare bachi riportati da altre persone. Non solo aiuterete a far +diventare il kernel più stabile, ma imparerete a riparare problemi veri dal +mondo ed accrescerete le vostre competenze, e gli altri sviluppatori saranno +al corrente della vostra presenza. Riparare bachi è una delle migliori vie per +acquisire meriti tra gli altri sviluppatori, perchè non a molte persone piace +perdere tempo a sistemare i bachi di altri. + +Per lavorare sui rapporti di bachi già riportati, andate su +https://bugzilla.kernel.org. + +Liste di discussione +-------------------- + +Come descritto in molti dei documenti qui sopra, la maggior parte degli +sviluppatori del kernel partecipano alla lista di discussione Linux Kernel. +I dettagli su come iscriversi e disiscriversi dalla lista possono essere +trovati al sito: + + http://vger.kernel.org/vger-lists.html#linux-kernel + +Ci sono diversi archivi della lista di discussione. Usate un qualsiasi motore +di ricerca per trovarli. Per esempio: + + http://dir.gmane.org/gmane.linux.kernel + +É caldamente consigliata una ricerca in questi archivi sul tema che volete +sollevare, prima di pubblicarlo sulla lista. Molte cose sono già state +discusse in dettaglio e registrate negli archivi della lista di discussione. + +Molti dei sottosistemi del kernel hanno anche una loro lista di discussione +dedicata. Guardate nel file MAINTAINERS per avere una lista delle liste di +discussione e il loro uso. + +Molte di queste liste sono gestite su kernel.org. Per informazioni consultate +la seguente pagina: + + http://vger.kernel.org/vger-lists.html + +Per favore ricordatevi della buona educazione quando utilizzate queste liste. +Sebbene sia un pò dozzinale, il seguente URL contiene alcune semplici linee +guida per interagire con la lista (o con qualsiasi altra lista): + + http://www.albion.com/netiquette/ + +Se diverse persone rispondo alla vostra mail, la lista dei riceventi (copia +conoscenza) potrebbe diventare abbastanza lunga. Non cancellate nessuno dalla +lista di CC: senza un buon motivo, e non rispondete solo all'indirizzo +della lista di discussione. Fateci l'abitudine perché capita spesso di +ricevere la stessa email due volte: una dal mittente ed una dalla lista; e non +cercate di modificarla aggiungendo intestazioni stravaganti, agli altri non +piacerà. + +Ricordate di rimanere sempre in argomento e di mantenere le attribuzioni +delle vostre risposte invariate; mantenete il "John Kernelhacker wrote ...:" +in cima alla vostra replica e aggiungete le vostre risposte fra i singoli +blocchi citati, non scrivete all'inizio dell'email. + +Se aggiungete patch alla vostra mail, assicuratevi che siano del tutto +leggibili come indicato in Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst. +Gli sviluppatori kernel non vogliono avere a che fare con allegati o patch +compresse; vogliono invece poter commentare le righe dei vostri cambiamenti, +il che può funzionare solo in questo modo. +Assicuratevi di utilizzare un gestore di mail che non alterì gli spazi ed i +caratteri. Un ottimo primo test è quello di inviare a voi stessi una mail e +cercare di sottoporre la vostra stessa patch. Se non funziona, sistemate il +vostro programma di posta, o cambiatelo, finché non funziona. + +Ed infine, per favore ricordatevi di mostrare rispetto per gli altri +sottoscriventi. + +Lavorare con la comunità +------------------------ + +L'obiettivo di questa comunità è quello di fornire il miglior kernel possibile. +Quando inviate una modifica che volete integrare, sarà valutata esclusivamente +dal punto di vista tecnico. Quindi, cosa dovreste aspettarvi? + + - critiche + - commenti + - richieste di cambiamento + - richieste di spiegazioni + - nulla + +Ricordatevi che questo fa parte dell'integrazione della vostra modifica +all'interno del kernel. Dovete essere in grado di accettare le critiche, +valutarle a livello tecnico ed eventualmente rielaborare nuovamente le vostre +modifiche o fornire delle chiare e concise motivazioni per le quali le +modifiche suggerite non dovrebbero essere fatte. +Se non riceverete risposte, aspettate qualche giorno e riprovate ancora, +qualche volta le cose si perdono nell'enorme mucchio di email. + +Cosa non dovreste fare? + + - aspettarvi che la vostra modifica venga accettata senza problemi + - mettervi sulla difensiva + - ignorare i commenti + - sottomettere nuovamente la modifica senza fare nessuno dei cambiamenti + richiesti + +In una comunità che è alla ricerca delle migliori soluzioni tecniche possibili, +ci saranno sempre opinioni differenti sull'utilità di una modifica. +Siate cooperativi e vogliate adattare la vostra idea in modo che sia inserita +nel kernel. O almeno vogliate dimostrare che la vostra idea vale. +Ricordatevi, sbagliare è accettato fintanto che siate disposti a lavorare verso +una soluzione che è corretta. + +È normale che le risposte alla vostra prima modifica possa essere +semplicemente una lista con dozzine di cose che dovreste correggere. +Questo **non** implica che la vostra patch non sarà accettata, e questo +**non** è contro di voi personalmente. +Semplicemente correggete tutte le questioni sollevate contro la vostra modifica +ed inviatela nuovamente. + +Differenze tra la comunità del kernel e le strutture aziendali +-------------------------------------------------------------- + +La comunità del kernel funziona diversamente rispetto a molti ambienti di +sviluppo aziendali. Qui di seguito una lista di cose che potete provare a +fare per evitare problemi: + + Cose da dire riguardanti le modifiche da voi proposte: + + - "Questo risolve più problematiche." + - "Questo elimina 2000 stringhe di codice." + - "Qui una modifica che spiega cosa sto cercando di fare." + - "L'ho testato su 5 diverse architetture.." + - "Qui una serie di piccole modifiche che.." + - "Questo aumenta le prestazioni di macchine standard..." + + Cose che dovreste evitare di dire: + + - "Lo abbiamo fatto in questo modo in AIX/ptx/Solaris, di conseguenza + deve per forza essere giusto..." + - "Ho fatto questo per 20 anni, quindi.." + - "Questo è richiesto dalla mia Azienda per far soldi" + - "Questo è per la linea di prodotti della nostra Azienda" + - "Ecco il mio documento di design di 1000 pagine che descrive ciò che ho + in mente" + - "Ci ho lavorato per 6 mesi..." + - "Ecco una patch da 5000 righe che.." + - "Ho riscritto il pasticcio attuale, ed ecco qua.." + - "Ho una scadenza, e questa modifica ha bisogno di essere approvata ora" + +Un'altra cosa nella quale la comunità del kernel si differenzia dai più +classici ambienti di ingegneria del software è la natura "senza volto" delle +interazioni umane. Uno dei benefici dell'uso delle email e di irc come forma +primordiale di comunicazione è l'assenza di discriminazione basata su genere e +razza. L'ambienti di lavoro Linux accetta donne e minoranze perchè tutto quello +che sei è un indirizzo email. Aiuta anche l'aspetto internazionale nel +livellare il terreno di gioco perchè non è possibile indovinare il genere +basandosi sul nome di una persona. Un uomo può chiamarsi Andrea ed una donna +potrebbe chiamarsi Pat. Gran parte delle donne che hanno lavorato al kernel +Linux e che hanno espresso una personale opinione hanno avuto esperienze +positive. + +La lingua potrebbe essere un ostacolo per quelle persone che non si trovano +a loro agio con l'inglese. Una buona padronanza del linguaggio può essere +necessaria per esporre le proprie idee in maniera appropiata all'interno +delle liste di discussione, quindi è consigliabile che rileggiate le vostre +email prima di inviarle in modo da essere certi che abbiano senso in inglese. + + +Spezzare le vostre modifiche +---------------------------- + +La comunità del kernel Linux non accetta con piacere grossi pezzi di codice +buttati lì tutti in una volta. Le modifiche necessitano di essere +adeguatamente presentate, discusse, e suddivise in parti più piccole ed +indipendenti. Questo è praticamente l'esatto opposto di quello che le +aziende fanno solitamente. La vostra proposta dovrebbe, inoltre, essere +presentata prestissimo nel processo di sviluppo, così che possiate ricevere +un riscontro su quello che state facendo. Lasciate che la comunità +senta che state lavorando con loro, e che non li stiate sfruttando come +discarica per le vostre aggiunte. In ogni caso, non inviate 50 email nello +stesso momento in una lista di discussione, il più delle volte la vostra serie +di modifiche dovrebbe essere più piccola. + +I motivi per i quali dovreste frammentare le cose sono i seguenti: + +1) Piccole modifiche aumentano le probabilità che vengano accettate, + altrimenti richiederebbe troppo tempo o sforzo nel verificarne + la correttezza. Una modifica di 5 righe può essere accettata da un + manutentore con a mala pena una seconda occhiata. Invece, una modifica da + 500 linee può richiedere ore di rilettura per verificarne la correttezza + (il tempo necessario è esponenzialmente proporzionale alla dimensione della + modifica, o giù di lì) + + Piccole modifiche sono inoltre molto facili da debuggare quando qualcosa + non va. È molto più facile annullare le modifiche una per una che + dissezionare una patch molto grande dopo la sua sottomissione (e rompere + qualcosa). + +2) È importante non solo inviare piccole modifiche, ma anche riscriverle e + semplificarle (o più semplicemente ordinarle) prima di sottoporle. + +Qui un'analogia dello sviluppatore kernel Al Viro: + + *"Pensate ad un insegnante di matematica che corregge il compito + di uno studente (di matematica). L'insegnante non vuole vedere le + prove e gli errori commessi dallo studente prima che arrivi alla + soluzione. Vuole vedere la risposta più pulita ed elegante + possibile. Un buono studente lo sa, e non presenterebbe mai le + proprie bozze prima prima della soluzione finale"* + + *"Lo stesso vale per lo sviluppo del kernel. I manutentori ed i + revisori non vogliono vedere il procedimento che sta dietro al + problema che uno sta risolvendo. Vogliono vedere una soluzione + semplice ed elegante."* + +Può essere una vera sfida il saper mantenere l'equilibrio fra una presentazione +elegante della vostra soluzione, lavorare insieme ad una comunità e dibattere +su un lavoro incompleto. Pertanto è bene entrare presto nel processo di +revisione per migliorare il vostro lavoro, ma anche per riuscire a tenere le +vostre modifiche in pezzettini che potrebbero essere già accettate, nonostante +la vostra intera attività non lo sia ancora. + +In fine, rendetevi conto che non è accettabile inviare delle modifiche +incomplete con la promessa che saranno "sistemate dopo". + + +Giustificare le vostre modifiche +-------------------------------- + +Insieme alla frammentazione delle vostre modifiche, è altrettanto importante +permettere alla comunità Linux di capire perché dovrebbero accettarle. +Nuove funzionalità devono essere motivate come necessarie ed utili. + + +Documentare le vostre modifiche +------------------------------- + +Quando inviate le vostre modifiche, fate particolare attenzione a quello che +scrivete nella vostra email. Questa diventerà il *ChangeLog* per la modifica, +e sarà visibile a tutti per sempre. Dovrebbe descrivere la modifica nella sua +interezza, contenendo: + + - perchè la modifica è necessaria + - l'approccio d'insieme alla patch + - dettagli supplementari + - risultati dei test + +Per maggiori dettagli su come tutto ciò dovrebbe apparire, riferitevi alla +sezione ChangeLog del documento: + + "The Perfect Patch" + http://www.ozlabs.org/~akpm/stuff/tpp.txt + +A volte tutto questo è difficile da realizzare. Il perfezionamento di queste +pratiche può richiedere anni (eventualmente). È un processo continuo di +miglioramento che richiede molta pazienza e determinazione. Ma non mollate, +si può fare. Molti lo hanno fatto prima, ed ognuno ha dovuto iniziare dove +siete voi ora. + + + + +---------- + +Grazie a Paolo Ciarrocchi che ha permesso che la sezione "Development Process" +(https://lwn.net/Articles/94386/) fosse basata sui testi da lui scritti, ed a +Randy Dunlap e Gerrit Huizenga per la lista di cose che dovreste e non +dovreste dire. Grazie anche a Pat Mochel, Hanna Linder, Randy Dunlap, +Kay Sievers, Vojtech Pavlik, Jan Kara, Josh Boyer, Kees Cook, Andrew Morton, +Andi Kleen, Vadim Lobanov, Jesper Juhl, Adrian Bunk, Keri Harris, Frans Pop, +David A. Wheeler, Junio Hamano, Michael Kerrisk, e Alex Shepard per le +loro revisioni, commenti e contributi. Senza il loro aiuto, questo documento +non sarebbe stato possibile. + +Manutentore: Greg Kroah-Hartman <greg@kroah.com> diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/index.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/index.rst @@ -0,0 +1,67 @@ +.. raw:: latex + + \renewcommand\thesection* + \renewcommand\thesubsection* + +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/index.rst <process_index>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_process_index: + +Lavorare con la comunità di sviluppo del kernel +=============================================== + +Quindi volete diventare sviluppatori del kernel? Benvenuti! C'è molto da +imparare sul lato tecnico del kernel, ma è anche importante capire come +funziona la nostra comunità. Leggere questi documenti renderà più facile +l'accettazione delle vostre modifiche con il minimo sforzo. + +Di seguito le guide che ogni sviluppatore dovrebbe leggere. + +.. toctree:: + :maxdepth: 1 + + howto + code-of-conduct + development-process + submitting-patches + coding-style + maintainer-pgp-guide + email-clients + kernel-enforcement-statement + kernel-driver-statement + +Poi ci sono altre guide sulla comunità che sono di interesse per molti +degli sviluppatori: + +.. toctree:: + :maxdepth: 1 + + changes + submitting-drivers + stable-api-nonsense + management-style + stable-kernel-rules + submit-checklist + kernel-docs + +Ed infine, qui ci sono alcune guide più tecniche che son state messe qua solo +perché non si è trovato un posto migliore. + +.. toctree:: + :maxdepth: 1 + + applying-patches + adding-syscalls + magic-number + volatile-considered-harmful + clang-format + +.. only:: subproject and html + + Indices + ======= + + * :ref:`genindex` diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-docs.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-docs.rst @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/kernel-docs.rst <kernel_docs>` + + +.. _it_kernel_docs: + +Indice di documenti per le persone interessate a capire e/o scrivere per il kernel Linux +======================================================================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst @@ -0,0 +1,211 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/kernel-driver-statement.rst <process_statement_driver>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_process_statement_driver: + +Dichiarazioni sui driver per il kernel +====================================== + +Presa di posizione sui moduli per il kernel Linux +------------------------------------------------- + +Noi, i sottoscritti sviluppatori del kernel, consideriamo pericoloso +o indesiderato qualsiasi modulo o driver per il kernel Linux di tipo +*a sorgenti chiusi* (*closed-source*). Ripetutamente, li abbiamo +trovati deleteri per gli utenti Linux, le aziende, ed in generale +l'ecosistema Linux. Questi moduli impediscono l'apertura, la stabilità, +la flessibilità, e la manutenibilità del modello di sviluppo di Linux +e impediscono ai loro utenti di beneficiare dell'esperienza dalla +comunità Linux. I fornitori che distribuiscono codice a sorgenti chiusi +obbligano i propri utenti a rinunciare ai principali vantaggi di Linux +o a cercarsi nuovi fornitori. +Perciò, al fine di sfruttare i vantaggi che codice aperto ha da offrire, +come l'abbattimento dei costi e un supporto condiviso, spingiamo i +fornitori ad adottare una politica di supporto ai loro clienti Linux +che preveda il rilascio dei sorgenti per il kernel. + +Parliamo solo per noi stessi, e non per una qualsiasi azienda per la +quale lavoriamo oggi, o abbiamo lavorato in passato, o lavoreremo in +futuro. + + + - Dave Airlie + - Nick Andrew + - Jens Axboe + - Ralf Baechle + - Felipe Balbi + - Ohad Ben-Cohen + - Muli Ben-Yehuda + - Jiri Benc + - Arnd Bergmann + - Thomas Bogendoerfer + - Vitaly Bordug + - James Bottomley + - Josh Boyer + - Neil Brown + - Mark Brown + - David Brownell + - Michael Buesch + - Franck Bui-Huu + - Adrian Bunk + - François Cami + - Ralph Campbell + - Luiz Fernando N. Capitulino + - Mauro Carvalho Chehab + - Denis Cheng + - Jonathan Corbet + - Glauber Costa + - Alan Cox + - Magnus Damm + - Ahmed S. Darwish + - Robert P. J. Day + - Hans de Goede + - Arnaldo Carvalho de Melo + - Helge Deller + - Jean Delvare + - Mathieu Desnoyers + - Sven-Thorsten Dietrich + - Alexey Dobriyan + - Daniel Drake + - Alex Dubov + - Randy Dunlap + - Michael Ellerman + - Pekka Enberg + - Jan Engelhardt + - Mark Fasheh + - J. Bruce Fields + - Larry Finger + - Jeremy Fitzhardinge + - Mike Frysinger + - Kumar Gala + - Robin Getz + - Liam Girdwood + - Jan-Benedict Glaw + - Thomas Gleixner + - Brice Goglin + - Cyrill Gorcunov + - Andy Gospodarek + - Thomas Graf + - Krzysztof Halasa + - Harvey Harrison + - Stephen Hemminger + - Michael Hennerich + - Tejun Heo + - Benjamin Herrenschmidt + - Kristian Høgsberg + - Henrique de Moraes Holschuh + - Marcel Holtmann + - Mike Isely + - Takashi Iwai + - Olof Johansson + - Dave Jones + - Jesper Juhl + - Matthias Kaehlcke + - Kenji Kaneshige + - Jan Kara + - Jeremy Kerr + - Russell King + - Olaf Kirch + - Roel Kluin + - Hans-Jürgen Koch + - Auke Kok + - Peter Korsgaard + - Jiri Kosina + - Aaro Koskinen + - Mariusz Kozlowski + - Greg Kroah-Hartman + - Michael Krufky + - Aneesh Kumar + - Clemens Ladisch + - Christoph Lameter + - Gunnar Larisch + - Anders Larsen + - Grant Likely + - John W. Linville + - Yinghai Lu + - Tony Luck + - Pavel Machek + - Matt Mackall + - Paul Mackerras + - Roland McGrath + - Patrick McHardy + - Kyle McMartin + - Paul Menage + - Thierry Merle + - Eric Miao + - Akinobu Mita + - Ingo Molnar + - James Morris + - Andrew Morton + - Paul Mundt + - Oleg Nesterov + - Luca Olivetti + - S.Çağlar Onur + - Pierre Ossman + - Keith Owens + - Venkatesh Pallipadi + - Nick Piggin + - Nicolas Pitre + - Evgeniy Polyakov + - Richard Purdie + - Mike Rapoport + - Sam Ravnborg + - Gerrit Renker + - Stefan Richter + - David Rientjes + - Luis R. Rodriguez + - Stefan Roese + - Francois Romieu + - Rami Rosen + - Stephen Rothwell + - Maciej W. Rozycki + - Mark Salyzyn + - Yoshinori Sato + - Deepak Saxena + - Holger Schurig + - Amit Shah + - Yoshihiro Shimoda + - Sergei Shtylyov + - Kay Sievers + - Sebastian Siewior + - Rik Snel + - Jes Sorensen + - Alexey Starikovskiy + - Alan Stern + - Timur Tabi + - Hirokazu Takata + - Eliezer Tamir + - Eugene Teo + - Doug Thompson + - FUJITA Tomonori + - Dmitry Torokhov + - Marcelo Tosatti + - Steven Toth + - Theodore Tso + - Matthias Urlichs + - Geert Uytterhoeven + - Arjan van de Ven + - Ivo van Doorn + - Rik van Riel + - Wim Van Sebroeck + - Hans Verkuil + - Horst H. von Brand + - Dmitri Vorobiev + - Anton Vorontsov + - Daniel Walker + - Johannes Weiner + - Harald Welte + - Matthew Wilcox + - Dan J. Williams + - Darrick J. Wong + - David Woodhouse + - Chris Wright + - Bryan Wu + - Rafael J. Wysocki + - Herbert Xu + - Vlad Yasevich + - Peter Zijlstra + - Bartlomiej Zolnierkiewicz + diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/kernel-enforcement-statement.rst <process_statement_kernel>` + + +.. _it_process_statement_kernel: + +Applicazione della licenza sul kernel Linux +=========================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/magic-number.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/magic-number.rst @@ -0,0 +1,170 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/magic-numbers.rst <magicnumbers>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_magicnumbers: + +I numeri magici di Linux +======================== + +Questo documento è un registro dei numeri magici in uso. Quando +aggiungete un numero magico ad una struttura, dovreste aggiungerlo anche +a questo documento; la cosa migliore è che tutti i numeri magici usati +dalle varie strutture siano unici. + +È **davvero** un'ottima idea proteggere le strutture dati del kernel con +dei numeri magici. Questo vi permette in fase d'esecuzione di (a) verificare +se una struttura è stata malmenata, o (b) avete passato a una procedura la +struttura errata. Quest'ultimo è molto utile - particolarmente quando si passa +una struttura dati tramite un puntatore void \*. Il codice tty, per esempio, +effettua questa operazione con regolarità passando avanti e indietro le +strutture specifiche per driver e discipline. + +Per utilizzare un numero magico, dovete dichiararlo all'inizio della struttura +dati, come di seguito:: + + struct tty_ldisc { + int magic; + ... + }; + +Per favore, seguite questa direttiva quando aggiungerete migliorie al kernel! +Mi ha risparmiato un numero illimitato di ore di debug, specialmente nei casi +più ostici dove si è andati oltre la dimensione di un vettore e la struttura +dati che lo seguiva in memoria è stata sovrascritta. Seguendo questa +direttiva, questi casi vengono identificati velocemente e in sicurezza. + +Registro dei cambiamenti:: + + Theodore Ts'o + 31 Mar 94 + + La tabella magica è aggiornata a Linux 2.1.55. + + Michael Chastain + <mailto:mec@shout.net> + 22 Sep 1997 + + Ora dovrebbe essere aggiornata a Linux 2.1.112. Dato che + siamo in un momento di congelamento delle funzionalità + (*feature freeze*) è improbabile che qualcosa cambi prima + della versione 2.2.x. Le righe sono ordinate secondo il + campo numero. + + Krzysztof G. Baranowski + <mailto: kgb@knm.org.pl> + 29 Jul 1998 + + Aggiornamento della tabella a Linux 2.5.45. Giusti nel congelamento + delle funzionalità ma è comunque possibile che qualche nuovo + numero magico s'intrufoli prima del kernel 2.6.x. + + Petr Baudis + <pasky@ucw.cz> + 03 Nov 2002 + + Aggiornamento della tabella magica a Linux 2.5.74. + + Fabian Frederick + <ffrederick@users.sourceforge.net> + 09 Jul 2003 + + +===================== ================ ======================== ========================================== +Nome magico Numero Struttura File +===================== ================ ======================== ========================================== +PG_MAGIC 'P' pg_{read,write}_hdr ``include/linux/pg.h`` +CMAGIC 0x0111 user ``include/linux/a.out.h`` +MKISS_DRIVER_MAGIC 0x04bf mkiss_channel ``drivers/net/mkiss.h`` +HDLC_MAGIC 0x239e n_hdlc ``drivers/char/n_hdlc.c`` +APM_BIOS_MAGIC 0x4101 apm_user ``arch/x86/kernel/apm_32.c`` +CYCLADES_MAGIC 0x4359 cyclades_port ``include/linux/cyclades.h`` +DB_MAGIC 0x4442 fc_info ``drivers/net/iph5526_novram.c`` +DL_MAGIC 0x444d fc_info ``drivers/net/iph5526_novram.c`` +FASYNC_MAGIC 0x4601 fasync_struct ``include/linux/fs.h`` +FF_MAGIC 0x4646 fc_info ``drivers/net/iph5526_novram.c`` +ISICOM_MAGIC 0x4d54 isi_port ``include/linux/isicom.h`` +PTY_MAGIC 0x5001 ``drivers/char/pty.c`` +PPP_MAGIC 0x5002 ppp ``include/linux/if_pppvar.h`` +SERIAL_MAGIC 0x5301 async_struct ``include/linux/serial.h`` +SSTATE_MAGIC 0x5302 serial_state ``include/linux/serial.h`` +SLIP_MAGIC 0x5302 slip ``drivers/net/slip.h`` +STRIP_MAGIC 0x5303 strip ``drivers/net/strip.c`` +X25_ASY_MAGIC 0x5303 x25_asy ``drivers/net/x25_asy.h`` +SIXPACK_MAGIC 0x5304 sixpack ``drivers/net/hamradio/6pack.h`` +AX25_MAGIC 0x5316 ax_disp ``drivers/net/mkiss.h`` +TTY_MAGIC 0x5401 tty_struct ``include/linux/tty.h`` +MGSL_MAGIC 0x5401 mgsl_info ``drivers/char/synclink.c`` +TTY_DRIVER_MAGIC 0x5402 tty_driver ``include/linux/tty_driver.h`` +MGSLPC_MAGIC 0x5402 mgslpc_info ``drivers/char/pcmcia/synclink_cs.c`` +TTY_LDISC_MAGIC 0x5403 tty_ldisc ``include/linux/tty_ldisc.h`` +USB_SERIAL_MAGIC 0x6702 usb_serial ``drivers/usb/serial/usb-serial.h`` +FULL_DUPLEX_MAGIC 0x6969 ``drivers/net/ethernet/dec/tulip/de2104x.c`` +USB_BLUETOOTH_MAGIC 0x6d02 usb_bluetooth ``drivers/usb/class/bluetty.c`` +RFCOMM_TTY_MAGIC 0x6d02 ``net/bluetooth/rfcomm/tty.c`` +USB_SERIAL_PORT_MAGIC 0x7301 usb_serial_port ``drivers/usb/serial/usb-serial.h`` +CG_MAGIC 0x00090255 ufs_cylinder_group ``include/linux/ufs_fs.h`` +RPORT_MAGIC 0x00525001 r_port ``drivers/char/rocket_int.h`` +LSEMAGIC 0x05091998 lse ``drivers/fc4/fc.c`` +GDTIOCTL_MAGIC 0x06030f07 gdth_iowr_str ``drivers/scsi/gdth_ioctl.h`` +RIEBL_MAGIC 0x09051990 ``drivers/net/atarilance.c`` +NBD_REQUEST_MAGIC 0x12560953 nbd_request ``include/linux/nbd.h`` +RED_MAGIC2 0x170fc2a5 (any) ``mm/slab.c`` +BAYCOM_MAGIC 0x19730510 baycom_state ``drivers/net/baycom_epp.c`` +ISDN_X25IFACE_MAGIC 0x1e75a2b9 isdn_x25iface_proto_data ``drivers/isdn/isdn_x25iface.h`` +ECP_MAGIC 0x21504345 cdkecpsig ``include/linux/cdk.h`` +LSOMAGIC 0x27091997 lso ``drivers/fc4/fc.c`` +LSMAGIC 0x2a3b4d2a ls ``drivers/fc4/fc.c`` +WANPIPE_MAGIC 0x414C4453 sdla_{dump,exec} ``include/linux/wanpipe.h`` +CS_CARD_MAGIC 0x43525553 cs_card ``sound/oss/cs46xx.c`` +LABELCL_MAGIC 0x4857434c labelcl_info_s ``include/asm/ia64/sn/labelcl.h`` +ISDN_ASYNC_MAGIC 0x49344C01 modem_info ``include/linux/isdn.h`` +CTC_ASYNC_MAGIC 0x49344C01 ctc_tty_info ``drivers/s390/net/ctctty.c`` +ISDN_NET_MAGIC 0x49344C02 isdn_net_local_s ``drivers/isdn/i4l/isdn_net_lib.h`` +SAVEKMSG_MAGIC2 0x4B4D5347 savekmsg ``arch/*/amiga/config.c`` +CS_STATE_MAGIC 0x4c4f4749 cs_state ``sound/oss/cs46xx.c`` +SLAB_C_MAGIC 0x4f17a36d kmem_cache ``mm/slab.c`` +COW_MAGIC 0x4f4f4f4d cow_header_v1 ``arch/um/drivers/ubd_user.c`` +I810_CARD_MAGIC 0x5072696E i810_card ``sound/oss/i810_audio.c`` +TRIDENT_CARD_MAGIC 0x5072696E trident_card ``sound/oss/trident.c`` +ROUTER_MAGIC 0x524d4157 wan_device [in ``wanrouter.h`` pre 3.9] +SAVEKMSG_MAGIC1 0x53415645 savekmsg ``arch/*/amiga/config.c`` +GDA_MAGIC 0x58464552 gda ``arch/mips/include/asm/sn/gda.h`` +RED_MAGIC1 0x5a2cf071 (any) ``mm/slab.c`` +EEPROM_MAGIC_VALUE 0x5ab478d2 lanai_dev ``drivers/atm/lanai.c`` +HDLCDRV_MAGIC 0x5ac6e778 hdlcdrv_state ``include/linux/hdlcdrv.h`` +PCXX_MAGIC 0x5c6df104 channel ``drivers/char/pcxx.h`` +KV_MAGIC 0x5f4b565f kernel_vars_s ``arch/mips/include/asm/sn/klkernvars.h`` +I810_STATE_MAGIC 0x63657373 i810_state ``sound/oss/i810_audio.c`` +TRIDENT_STATE_MAGIC 0x63657373 trient_state ``sound/oss/trident.c`` +M3_CARD_MAGIC 0x646e6f50 m3_card ``sound/oss/maestro3.c`` +FW_HEADER_MAGIC 0x65726F66 fw_header ``drivers/atm/fore200e.h`` +SLOT_MAGIC 0x67267321 slot ``drivers/hotplug/cpqphp.h`` +SLOT_MAGIC 0x67267322 slot ``drivers/hotplug/acpiphp.h`` +LO_MAGIC 0x68797548 nbd_device ``include/linux/nbd.h`` +OPROFILE_MAGIC 0x6f70726f super_block ``drivers/oprofile/oprofilefs.h`` +M3_STATE_MAGIC 0x734d724d m3_state ``sound/oss/maestro3.c`` +VMALLOC_MAGIC 0x87654320 snd_alloc_track ``sound/core/memory.c`` +KMALLOC_MAGIC 0x87654321 snd_alloc_track ``sound/core/memory.c`` +PWC_MAGIC 0x89DC10AB pwc_device ``drivers/usb/media/pwc.h`` +NBD_REPLY_MAGIC 0x96744668 nbd_reply ``include/linux/nbd.h`` +ENI155_MAGIC 0xa54b872d midway_eprom ``drivers/atm/eni.h`` +CODA_MAGIC 0xC0DAC0DA coda_file_info ``fs/coda/coda_fs_i.h`` +DPMEM_MAGIC 0xc0ffee11 gdt_pci_sram ``drivers/scsi/gdth.h`` +YAM_MAGIC 0xF10A7654 yam_port ``drivers/net/hamradio/yam.c`` +CCB_MAGIC 0xf2691ad2 ccb ``drivers/scsi/ncr53c8xx.c`` +QUEUE_MAGIC_FREE 0xf7e1c9a3 queue_entry ``drivers/scsi/arm/queue.c`` +QUEUE_MAGIC_USED 0xf7e1cc33 queue_entry ``drivers/scsi/arm/queue.c`` +HTB_CMAGIC 0xFEFAFEF1 htb_class ``net/sched/sch_htb.c`` +NMI_MAGIC 0x48414d4d455201 nmi_s ``arch/mips/include/asm/sn/nmi.h`` +===================== ================ ======================== ========================================== + +Da notare che ci sono anche dei numeri magici specifici per driver nel +*sound memory management*. Consultate ``include/sound/sndmagic.h`` per una +lista completa. Molti driver audio OSS hanno i loro numeri magici costruiti a +partire dall'identificativo PCI della scheda audio - nemmeno questi sono +elencati in questo file. + +Il file-system HFS è un altro grande utilizzatore di numeri magici - potete +trovarli qui ``fs/hfs/hfs.h``. diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/maintainer-pgp-guide.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/maintainer-pgp-guide.rst @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/maintainer-pgp-guide.rst <pgpguide>` + +.. _it_pgpguide: + +======================================== +Guida a PGP per i manutentori del kernel +======================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/management-style.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/management-style.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/management-style.rst <managementstyle>` + +.. _it_managementstyle: + +Tipo di gestione del kernel Linux +================================= + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-api-nonsense.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-api-nonsense.rst @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/stable-api-nonsense.rst <stable_api_nonsense>` + + +.. _it_stable_api_nonsense: + +L'interfaccia dei driver per il kernel Linux +============================================ + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/stable-kernel-rules.rst <stable_kernel_rules>` + +.. _it_stable_kernel_rules: + +Tutto quello che volevate sapere sui rilasci -stable di Linux +============================================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submit-checklist.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submit-checklist.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/submit-checklist.rst <submitchecklist>` + +.. _it_submitchecklist: + +Lista delle cose da fare per inviare una modifica al kernel Linux +~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-drivers.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-drivers.rst @@ -0,0 +1,12 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-drivers.rst <submittingdrivers>` + +.. _it_submittingdrivers: + +Sottomettere driver per il kernel Linux +======================================= + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/submitting-patches.rst @@ -0,0 +1,13 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/submitting-patches.rst <submittingpatches>` + + +.. _it_submittingpatches: + +Sottomettere modifiche: la guida essenziale per vedere il vostro codice nel kernel +================================================================================== + +.. warning:: + + TODO ancora da tradurre diff --git a/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/volatile-considered-harmful.rst b/Documentation/translations/it_IT/process/volatile-considered-harmful.rst @@ -0,0 +1,134 @@ +.. include:: ../disclaimer-ita.rst + +:Original: :ref:`Documentation/process/volatile-considered-harmful.rst <volatile_considered_harmful>` +:Translator: Federico Vaga <federico.vaga@vaga.pv.it> + +.. _it_volatile_considered_harmful: + +Perché la parola chiave "volatile" non dovrebbe essere usata +------------------------------------------------------------ + +Spesso i programmatori C considerano volatili quelle variabili che potrebbero +essere cambiate al di fuori dal thread di esecuzione corrente; come risultato, +a volte saranno tentati dall'utilizzare *volatile* nel kernel per le +strutture dati condivise. In altre parole, gli è stato insegnato ad usare +*volatile* come una variabile atomica di facile utilizzo, ma non è così. +L'uso di *volatile* nel kernel non è quasi mai corretto; questo documento ne +descrive le ragioni. + +Il punto chiave da capire su *volatile* è che il suo scopo è quello di +sopprimere le ottimizzazioni, che non è quasi mai quello che si vuole. +Nel kernel si devono proteggere le strutture dati condivise contro accessi +concorrenti e indesiderati: questa è un'attività completamente diversa. +Il processo di protezione contro gli accessi concorrenti indesiderati eviterà +anche la maggior parte dei problemi relativi all'ottimizzazione in modo più +efficiente. + +Come *volatile*, le primitive del kernel che rendono sicuro l'accesso ai dati +(spinlock, mutex, barriere di sincronizzazione, ecc) sono progettate per +prevenire le ottimizzazioni indesiderate. Se vengono usate opportunamente, +non ci sarà bisogno di utilizzare *volatile*. Se vi sembra che *volatile* sia +comunque necessario, ci dev'essere quasi sicuramente un baco da qualche parte. +In un pezzo di codice kernel scritto a dovere, *volatile* può solo servire a +rallentare le cose. + +Considerate questo tipico blocco di codice kernel:: + + spin_lock(&the_lock); + do_something_on(&shared_data); + do_something_else_with(&shared_data); + spin_unlock(&the_lock); + +Se tutto il codice seguisse le regole di sincronizzazione, il valore di un +dato condiviso non potrebbe cambiare inaspettatamente mentre si trattiene un +lock. Un qualsiasi altro blocco di codice che vorrà usare quel dato rimarrà +in attesa del lock. Gli spinlock agiscono come barriere di sincronizzazione +- sono stati esplicitamente scritti per agire così - il che significa che gli +accessi al dato condiviso non saranno ottimizzati. Quindi il compilatore +potrebbe pensare di sapere cosa ci sarà nel dato condiviso ma la chiamata +spin_lock(), che agisce come una barriera di sincronizzazione, gli imporrà di +dimenticarsi tutto ciò che sapeva su di esso. + +Se il dato condiviso fosse stato dichiarato come *volatile*, la +sincronizzazione rimarrebbe comunque necessaria. Ma verrà impedito al +compilatore di ottimizzare gli accessi al dato anche _dentro_ alla sezione +critica, dove sappiamo che in realtà nessun altro può accedervi. Mentre si +trattiene un lock, il dato condiviso non è *volatile*. Quando si ha a che +fare con dei dati condivisi, un'opportuna sincronizzazione rende inutile +l'uso di *volatile* - anzi potenzialmente dannoso. + +L'uso di *volatile* fu originalmente pensato per l'accesso ai registri di I/O +mappati in memoria. All'interno del kernel, l'accesso ai registri, dovrebbe +essere protetto dai lock, ma si potrebbe anche desiderare che il compilatore +non "ottimizzi" l'accesso ai registri all'interno di una sezione critica. +Ma, all'interno del kernel, l'accesso alla memoria di I/O viene sempre fatto +attraverso funzioni d'accesso; accedere alla memoria di I/O direttamente +con i puntatori è sconsigliato e non funziona su tutte le architetture. +Queste funzioni d'accesso sono scritte per evitare ottimizzazioni indesiderate, +quindi, di nuovo, *volatile* è inutile. + +Un'altra situazione dove qualcuno potrebbe essere tentato dall'uso di +*volatile*, è nel caso in cui il processore è in un'attesa attiva sul valore +di una variabile. Il modo giusto di fare questo tipo di attesa è il seguente:: + + while (my_variable != what_i_want) + cpu_relax(); + +La chiamata cpu_relax() può ridurre il consumo di energia del processore +o cedere il passo ad un processore hyperthreaded gemello; funziona anche come +una barriera per il compilatore, quindi, ancora una volta, *volatile* non è +necessario. Ovviamente, tanto per puntualizzare, le attese attive sono +generalmente un atto antisociale. + +Ci sono comunque alcune rare situazioni dove l'uso di *volatile* nel kernel +ha senso: + + - Le funzioni d'accesso sopracitate potrebbero usare *volatile* su quelle + architetture che supportano l'accesso diretto alla memoria di I/O. + In pratica, ogni chiamata ad una funzione d'accesso diventa una piccola + sezione critica a se stante, e garantisce che l'accesso avvenga secondo + le aspettative del programmatore. + + - I codice *inline assembly* che fa cambiamenti nella memoria, ma che non + ha altri effetti espliciti, rischia di essere rimosso da GCC. Aggiungere + la parola chiave *volatile* a questo codice ne previene la rimozione. + + - La variabile jiffies è speciale in quanto assume un valore diverso ogni + volta che viene letta ma può essere lette senza alcuna sincronizzazione. + Quindi jiffies può essere *volatile*, ma l'aggiunta ad altre variabili di + questo è sconsigliata. Jiffies è considerata uno "stupido retaggio" + (parole di Linus) in questo contesto; correggerla non ne varrebbe la pena e + causerebbe più problemi. + + - I puntatori a delle strutture dati in una memoria coerente che potrebbe + essere modificata da dispositivi di I/O può, a volte, essere legittimamente + *volatile*. Un esempio pratico può essere quello di un adattatore di rete + che utilizza un puntatore ad un buffer circolare, questo viene cambiato + dall'adattatore per indicare quali descrittori sono stati processati. + +Per la maggior parte del codice, nessuna delle giustificazioni sopracitate può +essere considerata. Di conseguenza, l'uso di *volatile* è probabile che venga +visto come un baco e porterà a verifiche aggiuntive. Gli sviluppatori tentati +dall'uso di *volatile* dovrebbero fermarsi e pensare a cosa vogliono davvero +ottenere. + +Le modifiche che rimuovono variabili *volatile* sono generalmente ben accette +- purché accompagnate da una giustificazione che dimostri che i problemi di +concorrenza siano stati opportunamente considerati. + +Riferimenti +=========== + +[1] http://lwn.net/Articles/233481/ + +[2] http://lwn.net/Articles/233482/ + +Crediti +======= + +Impulso e ricerca originale di Randy Dunlap + +Scritto da Jonathan Corbet + +Migliorato dai commenti di Satyam Sharma, Johannes Stezenbach, Jesper +Juhl, Heikki Orsila, H. Peter Anvin, Philipp Hahn, e Stefan Richter. diff --git a/Documentation/vm/index.rst b/Documentation/vm/index.rst @@ -2,7 +2,9 @@ Linux Memory Management Documentation ===================================== -This is a collection of documents about Linux memory management (mm) subsystem. +This is a collection of documents about the Linux memory management (mm) +subsystem. If you are looking for advice on simply allocating memory, +see the :ref:`memory-allocation`. User guides for MM features =========================== diff --git a/Documentation/x86/boot.txt b/Documentation/x86/boot.txt @@ -58,7 +58,7 @@ Protocol 2.11: (Kernel 3.6) Added a field for offset of EFI handover protocol entry point. Protocol 2.12: (Kernel 3.8) Added the xloadflags field and extension fields - to struct boot_params for loading bzImage and ramdisk + to struct boot_params for loading bzImage and ramdisk above 4G in 64bit. **** MEMORY LAYOUT diff --git a/include/linux/slab.h b/include/linux/slab.h @@ -486,48 +486,47 @@ static __always_inline void *kmalloc_large(size_t size, gfp_t flags) * kmalloc is the normal method of allocating memory * for objects smaller than page size in the kernel. * - * The @flags argument may be one of: + * The @flags argument may be one of the GFP flags defined at + * include/linux/gfp.h and described at + * :ref:`Documentation/core-api/mm-api.rst <mm-api-gfp-flags>` * - * %GFP_USER - Allocate memory on behalf of user. May sleep. + * The recommended usage of the @flags is described at + * :ref:`Documentation/core-api/memory-allocation.rst <memory-allocation>` * - * %GFP_KERNEL - Allocate normal kernel ram. May sleep. + * Below is a brief outline of the most useful GFP flags * - * %GFP_ATOMIC - Allocation will not sleep. May use emergency pools. - * For example, use this inside interrupt handlers. + * %GFP_KERNEL + * Allocate normal kernel ram. May sleep. * - * %GFP_HIGHUSER - Allocate pages from high memory. + * %GFP_NOWAIT + * Allocation will not sleep. * - * %GFP_NOIO - Do not do any I/O at all while trying to get memory. + * %GFP_ATOMIC + * Allocation will not sleep. May use emergency pools. * - * %GFP_NOFS - Do not make any fs calls while trying to get memory. - * - * %GFP_NOWAIT - Allocation will not sleep. - * - * %__GFP_THISNODE - Allocate node-local memory only. - * - * %GFP_DMA - Allocation suitable for DMA. - * Should only be used for kmalloc() caches. Otherwise, use a - * slab created with SLAB_DMA. + * %GFP_HIGHUSER + * Allocate memory from high memory on behalf of user. * * Also it is possible to set different flags by OR'ing * in one or more of the following additional @flags: * - * %__GFP_HIGH - This allocation has high priority and may use emergency pools. - * - * %__GFP_NOFAIL - Indicate that this allocation is in no way allowed to fail - * (think twice before using). + * %__GFP_HIGH + * This allocation has high priority and may use emergency pools. * - * %__GFP_NORETRY - If memory is not immediately available, - * then give up at once. + * %__GFP_NOFAIL + * Indicate that this allocation is in no way allowed to fail + * (think twice before using). * - * %__GFP_NOWARN - If allocation fails, don't issue any warnings. + * %__GFP_NORETRY + * If memory is not immediately available, + * then give up at once. * - * %__GFP_RETRY_MAYFAIL - Try really hard to succeed the allocation but fail - * eventually. + * %__GFP_NOWARN + * If allocation fails, don't issue any warnings. * - * There are other flags available as well, but these are not intended - * for general use, and so are not documented here. For a full list of - * potential flags, always refer to linux/gfp.h. + * %__GFP_RETRY_MAYFAIL + * Try really hard to succeed the allocation but fail + * eventually. */ static __always_inline void *kmalloc(size_t size, gfp_t flags) { diff --git a/mm/slab_common.c b/mm/slab_common.c @@ -406,8 +406,9 @@ out_free_cache: goto out; } -/* - * kmem_cache_create_usercopy - Create a cache. +/** + * kmem_cache_create_usercopy - Create a cache with a region suitable + * for copying to userspace * @name: A string which is used in /proc/slabinfo to identify this cache. * @size: The size of objects to be created in this cache. * @align: The required alignment for the objects. @@ -416,7 +417,6 @@ out_free_cache: * @usersize: Usercopy region size * @ctor: A constructor for the objects. * - * Returns a ptr to the cache on success, NULL on failure. * Cannot be called within a interrupt, but can be interrupted. * The @ctor is run when new pages are allocated by the cache. * @@ -425,12 +425,14 @@ out_free_cache: * %SLAB_POISON - Poison the slab with a known test pattern (a5a5a5a5) * to catch references to uninitialised memory. * - * %SLAB_RED_ZONE - Insert `Red' zones around the allocated memory to check + * %SLAB_RED_ZONE - Insert `Red` zones around the allocated memory to check * for buffer overruns. * * %SLAB_HWCACHE_ALIGN - Align the objects in this cache to a hardware * cacheline. This can be beneficial if you're counting cycles as closely * as davem. + * + * Return: a pointer to the cache on success, NULL on failure. */ struct kmem_cache * kmem_cache_create_usercopy(const char *name, @@ -514,6 +516,31 @@ out_unlock: } EXPORT_SYMBOL(kmem_cache_create_usercopy); +/** + * kmem_cache_create - Create a cache. + * @name: A string which is used in /proc/slabinfo to identify this cache. + * @size: The size of objects to be created in this cache. + * @align: The required alignment for the objects. + * @flags: SLAB flags + * @ctor: A constructor for the objects. + * + * Cannot be called within a interrupt, but can be interrupted. + * The @ctor is run when new pages are allocated by the cache. + * + * The flags are + * + * %SLAB_POISON - Poison the slab with a known test pattern (a5a5a5a5) + * to catch references to uninitialised memory. + * + * %SLAB_RED_ZONE - Insert `Red` zones around the allocated memory to check + * for buffer overruns. + * + * %SLAB_HWCACHE_ALIGN - Align the objects in this cache to a hardware + * cacheline. This can be beneficial if you're counting cycles as closely + * as davem. + * + * Return: a pointer to the cache on success, NULL on failure. + */ struct kmem_cache * kmem_cache_create(const char *name, unsigned int size, unsigned int align, slab_flags_t flags, void (*ctor)(void *)) diff --git a/scripts/kernel-doc b/scripts/kernel-doc @@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ my $anon_struct_union = 0; my $type_constant = '\b``([^\`]+)``\b'; my $type_constant2 = '\%([-_\w]+)'; my $type_func = '(\w+)\(\)'; -my $type_param = '\@(\w*(\.\w+)*(\.\.\.)?)'; +my $type_param = '\@(\w*((\.\w+)|(->\w+))*(\.\.\.)?)'; my $type_fp_param = '\@(\w+)\(\)'; # Special RST handling for func ptr params my $type_env = '(\$\w+)'; my $type_enum = '\&(enum\s*([_\w]+))'; @@ -361,7 +361,7 @@ my $doc_com = '\s*\*\s*'; my $doc_com_body = '\s*\* ?'; my $doc_decl = $doc_com . '(\w+)'; # @params and a strictly limited set of supported section names -my $doc_sect = $doc_com . +my $doc_sect = $doc_com . '\s*(\@[.\w]+|\@\.\.\.|description|context|returns?|notes?|examples?)\s*:(.*)'; my $doc_content = $doc_com_body . '(.*)'; my $doc_block = $doc_com . 'DOC:\s*(.*)?'; @@ -751,7 +751,7 @@ sub output_blockhead_rst(%) { # # Apply the RST highlights to a sub-block of text. -# +# sub highlight_block($) { # The dohighlight kludge requires the text be called $contents my $contents = shift; @@ -1062,7 +1062,7 @@ sub dump_struct($$) { my $x = shift; my $file = shift; - if ($x =~ /(struct|union)\s+(\w+)\s*\{(.*)\}/) { + if ($x =~ /(struct|union)\s+(\w+)\s*\{(.*)\}(\s*(__packed|__aligned|__attribute__\s*\(\([a-z0-9,_\s\(\)]*\)\)))*/) { my $decl_type = $1; $declaration_name = $2; my $members = $3; @@ -1073,8 +1073,9 @@ sub dump_struct($$) { # strip comments: $members =~ s/\/\*.*?\*\///gos; # strip attributes - $members =~ s/__attribute__\s*\(\([a-z,_\*\s\(\)]*\)\)//i; - $members =~ s/__aligned\s*\([^;]*\)//gos; + $members =~ s/\s*__attribute__\s*\(\([a-z0-9,_\*\s\(\)]*\)\)//gi; + $members =~ s/\s*__aligned\s*\([^;]*\)//gos; + $members =~ s/\s*__packed\s*//gos; $members =~ s/\s*CRYPTO_MINALIGN_ATTR//gos; # replace DECLARE_BITMAP $members =~ s/DECLARE_BITMAP\s*\(([^,)]+),\s*([^,)]+)\)/unsigned long $1\[BITS_TO_LONGS($2)\]/gos;